Recollections and Memories of our
Grandparents, Edson and Alta


Contibutors:

Joan Woodward (Fred; Edson) Daren Morgan  (Wayne; Clyde; Edson) Jack Morgan  (Fred; Edson)
Alta Haggett  (Olive; Edson) Chuck Morgan  (Fred; Edson) Roger Morgan  (Ray; Edson)
Bill Matson  (Ethel; Edson) Lois Breakey  (Helen; Edson) Patricia Morgan  (Frank; Quartus)
Lorraine Breakey  (Helen; Edson) Wayne Morgan  (Clyde; Edson) Karen Morgan  (sister-in-law)

The following is actual text copied from emails.  Anyone wishing to join in on this exchange of  thoughts and
memories are encouraged to do so by contacting any of the above contributors.  

Lorraine, a belated Happy Birthday to you!  I sure do hope you had a great day.  My best to you and Dick.
 
I've been really enjoying the back and forth between our family members - silly and fun!  This is a wonderful way for us to stay in touch and check in on one another, and have a good chuckle in the process.   And I hope we're able to add email addresses of more and more family members in order to get them "in the loop."
 
Joan, I think you have a BRILLIANT idea!  You know some of us family members are younger than others of us (I'm not pointing any fingers!); and some of us might have some memories of Grandma and Grandpa Morgan.  They had both died before I was born, so other than stories told about them, I have no memories.  I would love to hear from cousins (or anyone) who might have memories, however slight, about Edson and Alta Morgan.  I've always been disappointed that I never had an opportunity to know them on a personal level. 
 
Are those of you who knew them, albeit at a young age, interested in sharing any memories?  They don't have to be funny stories, just information.  Did they have soft voices?  Were they quiet people?  Opinionated?  I know they enjoyed a good laugh, and I know that Grandma was a prolific baker.  Were they strict with their grandchildren?  Any kind of information at all would be interesting.
 
And once we've exhausted or memories about grandparents, perhaps we could start sharing stories about our parents/aunts & uncles, beginning with Aunt Helen and Uncle John.  But first, how about our grandparents?
 
And how do we build the email distribution on this exchange?  Maybe we should just check and see if our own family members are accounted for, and if not, add them.
 
Hugs to you all,
Bill Matson

Great idea Bill, you and I, of the same generation, missed out on knowing them, and the only way we can learn is from our “mentors”.  A good start might be to read my father’s (Wayne) and my Uncle Bob’s musings on the Morgan website.  I enjoyed them very much and was surprised at both of their literary talents.

 Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.


Hi Bill--
 
Great idea and here are a couple of memories I have of them (being 69, soon 70)--
 
I fell down their stairs while I was very young--the stairs were sharp edged (no finished moldings in that farm house as I remember it), and I still have a small scar right on my hair line from that.
 
I can remember a rather quiet Grampa sitting in his rocking chair by the kitchen window, and Gramma always seemingly making cookies to sell.  She packaged them in wax paper, very neatly wrapped, and sealed the wax paper closed with a flatiron I suspect, but don't really remember that detail.  Molasses, and what I call "white" cookies--large (3 or 4" in diameter), delicious!
 
I also can remember Jack and I playing around a stump that Grampa was burning one time while we were up there.  I think we were throwing stones into the burning stump, and I got a couple of hot embers down inside my shoe, which burned a little!
 
Also, I remember my Dad taking us down the lane towards the N&St.L railroad track, and cutting willow saplings and making willow whistles for us--you had to do this in the spring, while the sap was running in the tree, and then hammered on the bark, until you could grab it, and twist the bark off the wood.  Notch the wood, and then cut an opening in the bark, and then slide it back together, and if you did everything right, you had a whistle.  And we also had fun with home-made slingshots up there.
 
My fondest memory last--one holiday lots of family members were up there for dinner.  Uncle Bob Haggett and I believe Uncle Bill were killing  chickens to cook for dinner.  I no doubt insisted on helping, so Uncle Bob had me grab the legs of the chicken and told me to be sure and hang onto the legs no matter what happened, and then he chopped off the head.  Well, of course the chicken flapped its wings like crazy after having its head cut off, and meanwhile I was getting chicken blood all over my clothes, arms and everything else, but I didn't let go.  I think everybody thought it was real funny except my mother!
 
That's what I remember.

Chuck Morgan

great idea Bill ... I am with you and many others who never had the opportunity or the priviledge of knowing Gramma and Grandpa Morgan ... As her namesake, I have always wondered if I am at all like her .. I ask my mother questions every time I go home and she has shared some wonderful memories she has .. Mom and dad do not have a computer (in fact, I think they just got rid of their rotary phone just a couple of years ago) but I was thinking it would be wonderful if Linda, Lou or any other cousins in Norwood could stop by the farm and interview mom .. get some things down on paper like Wayne and Bob did .. what treasures!! .. we could all listen to the stories when we get together again.  I too am wondering what their demeanor was .. mom has told me that Uncle Clyde and Aunt Ethel were most like Grandpa and the louder more silly of her siblings were perhaps more like Gramma ... I think mom would be a wealth of information and I am more than sure if anyone stopped by the farm, she would have lunch out and maybe even a molasses or lemon sugared cookie somewhere in the pantry .. how how I loved those too Chuck!!! ... why do you think I am one of the hefty cousins??? ..lol .. anyway, those in Norwood could think about my request and go for it if it fits someones schedule ... love to all ...Alta

Lol..that is great Chuck, seems like Uncle Bob Haggett must have always had the chicken duty, I think I recall Dad being in your position, but he let go.  Guess Uncle Bob didn’t like that at all..the chicken ran away.
 
Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.

Ahhh..the molasses cookies.  I dug out the recipe the other day…on my agenda for the weekend…want me to send some west? 
Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.


Hi Bill, and all the rest of my cousins - Great idea.  I don't think I was much more than age 3 when Grandpa died, but I do have a couple of memories of him.  The first one was when one evening he was laying on the couch in the livingroom, and I had ahold of his arm and was trying to pull him off.  I finally did it, with the help of Aunt Olive.  I can remember being so excited that I had got him off the couch.  Another memory is going up to the farmhouse with my mother one afternoon.  Grandma was in the kitchen and Grandpa was up over a hill in direction of where the water pump was.  It amazes me that they let me go by myself to find him.  But I did find him and I remember walking back to the house with him, holding his hand.  The most vivid memory I have of Grandma was when she lived on New Street and I was there one day when she was making doughnuts.  I was standing on a chair, or stool, "helping" her.  The telephone rang, and while she was on the telephone, I started eating the raw doughnut holes.  I don't remember her spanking me, but I DO remember her yelling at me.  It hurt my feelings.
 
I have thought for a long time that it would be great if there could be a website or something set up for us to go into to post anything happening in our families.  I don't know if that can be done, or if there would even be any interest in it, but it might be a good way to keep in touch.
 
I have emailed Marjorie Pang to see if everything is ok with her and her family out in Ca., but have not had a reply from her.  I believe her home is near LA and wonder if maybe they are in area that had to be evacuated.  Does anyone know?
 
Love you all -
Lorraine

oh yes Daren ... and don't forget that little tad of sugar right in the very middle of the cookie!!!
Alta

Bill, did you get copies of the memories that Wayne and Bob Morgan wrote - if not, I will certainly get you copies.  Wayne and Bob had it all over the rest of us in acquaintanceship. 
 
I recall spending a night at Grandma Morgan's up on the farm.  Etta Rae stayed over, too (and the next morning her house in Norfolk burned down.  Etta Rae kept trying to call home - Grandma knew, but didn't want to tell her - and this was in the days of a "real" operator to whom you said "34-J, please" and the operator knew just who YOU were and who you were calling!).  So, Grandma really sweated it and finally had to tell E. R., who took it very well.  (We went out to the pasture and dropped snowballs from between our legs so we would be "pooping" like the cows did.  I don't do that anymore - at 71, I consider myself lucky to do it for me.)
 
Anyway, Grandma Morgan was a very kind Grandma.  That morning I had waked up in the dark to the electric lines humming, the canary singing, 20 foot (I kid you not or not very much) banks of drifted snow, and Grandma's baked goods' smells already filling the house.  Grandma loved having her naturally waving gray hair combed (ever seen those little fine-toothed combs that were for dandruff - washing hair w/o indoor plumbing was quite an ordeal - ask Aunt Olive about it) and the grandkids loved combing it.  I think someone told me lately that Grandma often dozed off as her hair was combed - no wonder!  She worked so hard. Grandma limped a little (I only recognize that now, but I well remember the old-fashiioned lace-up shoes with heels - in Grandma's case, somewhat worn down - makes my eyes fill with tears!).
 
Once I popped out from behind a chair (I was 4-6 probably) and thumbed my nose at a young aunt still living at home.  The aunt had a hissy-fit (I didn't know what thumbing your nose meant.  To me, it was a funny gesture). My father yelled, but Grandma took me onto her lap and whispered the actual meaning:  "kiss my ass!"  Grandma was in NO WAY a crude woman, but I guess she believed in calling a spade a spade.
 
I have little snap-shot memories of Grandpa - who always had a pleasant half-smile on his face - much like Uncle Clyde -  and another time I will tell you about them.
 
Actually though, I want your memories of the aunts and uncles - your parents, all eighteen of them.  That is harder, it seems - Lorraine got to thinking about her Dad and finally asked her "grandaughter," Marcia, who told her about Uncle John playing his violin evenings while Aunt Helen accompanied him.  Lorraine had no recollection of that, so, cousins, nieces and nephews and sisters-in-law, don't be afraid to ask someone else what THEY remember best about your parent.  Bill, I have your news letter from way back about staying over at the Haggett farm during haying season - just priceless - you have a way with words.  I also remember from that issue the baby-naming contest, i.e. "Uncle Fred Morgan Sperry" and also your father's poem - i can't quite quote it from memory, but something about in your mother's life the church was number 1, Raggedy Annes were number 2 and he (your father) was number 3.
 
Much love to you all

Joan  
I, of course have no recollection or remembrances of Grandma and Grandpa Morgan.  However, I do remember Pop and Ma (Fred & Rena) talking a few times.  Pop thought life was absolutely wonderful in the house up on the hill between Norwood and Norfolk, where the Rugers eventually lived.  He spoke about the walls just being the 2x4 and no actual walls being built (I am not sure how long that lasted).  But he remembered being able to toss things to each other from different rooms through the open spaces and thought that was great fun.  And Ma talked a lot about how Gramma would just shuffle around in shoes that was "well run over" back and forth from the stove to the table, baking and baking bread, cookies, etc., to sell at McCormick's.  Pop told of the time that his father sat in the woods on a log for hours watching and playing with some little baby skunks.  So I would say, that perhaps Grandpa Morgan was a very patient man who was content to do things at his own pace and Grandma Morgan was a tireless hard worker.
 
Love,
Karen


I have a chicken story too, but concerns who else but Uncle Bob and Aunt Olive, not Grandpa and Grandma.  When I was very young I was up at the farm (where they still live) and Aunt Olive was holding chickens while Uncle Bob axed their heads off.  Aunt Olive would then throw the headless chickens on the ground, and I swear to this day that those chickens were chasing me around the yard without their heads, and all the time I was crying and screaming my head off.  To this day I have problems holding chicken parts to clean them.  Thank heavens for the freeze dried chickens you can get in the bags at the markets now!
 
Lorraine

I'm really tickled to see the "rundown shoes" verified and to hear the story about Grandpa playing with the baby skunks.
Joan

We somehow discovered that peanut butter was great on G'ma Morgan's white and molasses cookies.  I made the mistake of asking for peanut butter in Grandma's presence and she had fun teasing me, asking if her cookies were not good enough to eat w/o.
Joan

This is great fun!  Thank you and keep it up - I am also in the dark as to what my grandparents were "all about", but I do know that my mother, Helen, also just loved to have her fine hair combed by us girls.  So Grandpa played with baby skunks - a true nature lover, or alittle nutty(in a good way).  So did the Morgan sense of humor come from Grandma, or Grandpa?

Love to all, Lois


Lol..peanut butter on molasses?  Why not.  I can remember sitting on the counter in Grandma Morgan (Ruby) kitchen eating her freshly made donuts with Grandpa Morgan (Clyde), it seems to me that he liked to put mustard on his donuts and got me eating them that way too.

 

Daren  (this is fun)


my mom, Olive, inherited Gramma Morgans baking finesse as well as her (roll over shoe appearance)... I remember my mother ordering special shoes from a store in Watertown .... she also had (and maybe still has) a scalloped cookie cutter that was used to cut out the lemon, molasses, raisin and sugar cookies .. they were soft and wonderful with a sprinkle of sugar in the very middle ...  maybe the cutter was originally Grammas <--- not sure of that one ... but, I do know for sure that mom has Grammas recipe book .... inside, the pages have faded which are stuck with flour, salt and most likely lard from the hands that thumbed through the book ... Can you imagine Grammas hands covered in bread dough like the picture of Grandpa and her in front of their house? .. Her arms are crossed as she tries to hide her hands ... I remember my mom telling me that she stopped kneading bread long enough to have her picture taken ...  how I wish I had known her ...
 
I also wonder if both Grandpa and Gramma were musically inclined and if they ever sang together at church or if they even went to church .. there is so much to discover about them .. is there a way the Morgan website could be the link for all of us to post our stories and memories? ... A.

I suspect the "Morgan humor" came from Grandma, but I'm not sure - after all, what kind of person plays with skunks?
Joan

AWGHHHH!  (to mustard on donuts)
Joan

They went to church all right.  Those pews we all (still?) sit in were theirs, and others, like I, must remember the 2 pews of aunts, uncles and kids each Sunday morning.
Joan

We do need to jot down our questions and send them to Aunt Olive.  I asked her some time ago if she had a tape recorder and wished she'd record some recollections.  When the last 2 aunts are gone, there goes a wealth of stuff lost.
Joan

Morning Bill,
           You had asked about the temperment of Granda and Grandma
Morgan. Grandpa was very quiet and i did hear from Grandma once(very
loud}. When she moved to Norwood , she hired me to keep her wood box in
the kitchen, stocked with wood every day. I day i didn,t do my job and i
heard about it.:-)

Halloween --about 1952--I took my son Daren to Aunt Helens to trick or
treat. I was dressed in a black trench coat,black hat, and a ugly face
with a pipe stuck in it.
To this day,i believe she didn,t know who we were.(you couldn,t get
anything past my Aunt Helen--but we did that night)

Wayne

I'm using this roundabout way to get to Bill.  Suddenly I'm getting
undeliverable message warnings to Bill.  Help, Bill!
Joan

Maybe Bill blocked you out, Joan!!
Lorraine

I think my mother inherited Grandma's shoes.
Lorraine

Was it McCormick's where Grandma took her cookies to be sold?  I had always thought it was the A&P store.  McCormick's would make more sense  - local vs. chain
Lorraine

I believe that I have Grandma's scalloped cookie cutter.  For years I have looked for another whenever I have been in a store that sells such a thing, and finally found one this past summer or fall.  Now, I'm so old I can't remember where it was, but may have been in Cutler's in Petoskey, Mi.  I also have Grandma's flour sifter (green is worn off the handle) and her umbrella (has a wooden shaft).  Should we start a museum?
Lorraine

I wondered, but that is MEAN< MEAN<MEAN!  No more love to Bill for 5 min.,
at least.
Joan

Though many would not agree, I am one who believes things should be in a museum for fair access, for ease of locating items, and for preservation of them!  My 2 cents worth for the day (I promise).
Joan

Hi Joan.  Just sent you a personal email from my other email address:  WJMinDC@comcast.net.  Both email addresses for me are good.  I'm not sure why you haven't been able to get an email to me.  I've been receiving the family chain of emails just fine.  Anyway . . .  who knows.  I'm not a techno-geek, and I don't understand how this technology works at all.  I just love the fact that we have it and are able to use it in this way.  Anyone can use either email address to reach me.
 
I love these email chains, and I love the fact that some of my cousins have memories they are able to share with us.  They are priceless!!  I've got a bit to share and will try to do it this morning before I go into work.
 
Hugs to everyone.
Bill

Family,
 
Daren, thanks for your heads up about your Dad's and your Uncle Bob Morgan's memories on the Morgan Website.  I had not notice those before had never read them.  They are great!  Thanks Wayne and Bob for taking the time to share those memories.
 
And Alta, you're right that someone should interview your Mom and Dad.  If someone else hasn't done that by next summer, I'll do it when I'm in the North Country.  I did an interview with my Dad, Uncle Fred and Aunt Alice.  Below is part of the transcript of my interview with Uncle Fred done sometime in the early 1990's.  B = me (Bill Matson)  F = Uncle Fred Morgan  R = Aunt Rena (Brown) Morgan.  words in italics and [bracketed] are my additions (added for purpose of clarity).  Hope you enjoy.  (sorry that it is a bit long for an email.)
 
 
 
B:         What do you remember about your Dad?  What are some things you remember about him?   In terms of the kind of guy he was and the way he was part of the family.

 

F:         He was . . . how would I say it . . . he was very kind, ah . . . good to us children . . . couldn't . . . or when I say good, he was kind to us.   Never had the money so he could bring home treats to us, you know, too much.  But . . . ah . . .

 

R:        I think of Clyde.  Clyde was so like him.

 

F:         He went to church occasionally.  Not a lot . . . but he went to church.   Mom would never miss church.  And when the two of them would go the family would fill one pew all the way across.

 

B:         He sang a lot, didn't he?  Wasn't he musical?

 

F:         Yeah . . . this is interesting, too, and I think it would be to you.  We lived out in Knapps [Station].  The McGee family [Burt and Grace Marsh McGee.  Grace was Alta Marsh Morgan's sister] , they lived, oh probably about a mile from us . . . it would be right across lots from us.  And we were real close.  Nights during the week, sometimes maybe one night, but on Sunday or Saturday . . . Sunday we'd all be together for dinner.   Aunt Grace and Mom would cook the dinner, fix it . . . it was a big family then with our big family.  And . . . ah . . . I remember this very well . . . with Dad and Uncle Bert (Uncle Bert was a good singer); they always got Helen [Helen Morgan Breakey, Fred's sister] to play the piano and they would sing.  Oh, one song they sang . . . they'd always sing it . . . was . . . ah . . . well, they sang "The Church in the Wildwood," too; but this was . . . there was hunting in there . . . what was the name of that thing?!   My mind is blank . . . but, it was a bass solo, and sometimes Dad would sing it and sometimes Uncle Bert would say, "Let me sing the solo this time!"   Helen would be playin'!  And also we had a little, a little orchestra.  I think Ray played the trombone, Clyde . . . now this is our own family!   'Course the McGee's, I don't remember what they played.  I remember Uncle Bert played the coronet.  Dad played bass.   I wasn't old enough to play anything . . . we just played around! [laughter]  Lets see . . . Clyde and Mildred [Mildred Morgan Orr, Fred's sister] both played violin.  Helen on the piano.  Ray on the trombone.   I don't think Alice played in it.  She wasn't old enough.  I think it started with Mildred on the violin.   Mildred and Clyde.  And we'd have a big time.  We'd have the orchestrations, you know, and . . . yup . . . a family orchestra, you know.   Nothing you could take out on tour or anything like that.  But we had fun.  We had fun.

 

B:         Aunt Alice said she thought she remembered, although she said she was a little too young to remember for sure, that my Mom [Ethel Morgan Matson] was born when you all lived out on the Knapp Station road.  But she thought she remembered my Mom being born over at Aunt Grace's house.

 

F:         That could very well be.  Because when the children were coming . . . if it were Aunt Grace, Mom would be over there.   If it were Mom, Aunt Grace would be over here!  Of course no hospitals at that time.  You didn't go to the hospital to have a baby.

 

R:        I think an interesting thing about Dad Morgan was his ability to go into the woods and pick all the herbs and plants that were healing qualities.   And he was so good at that.  He wishes now that he had learned . . .

 

F:         Oh, yes!  To my knowledge, Bill . . . your father [Almon D. "Bill" Matson] says I'm wrong . . . he says you've got to have root beer.  He had a big wooden barrel, and every fall that barrel was filled with root beer.   And he would go out and down into the woods and the swamp and get all these roots.  He knew what they were.  Now your father said that they had to buy something, too.   It all didn't come from roots.  And that might be.  I can't argue, I don't know, but . . . my thought right now is that he got all of it out of the woods . . . out of the swamp.   He'd come home with the darndest mess of stuff, you know, and he'd steep it . . . put it on and steep it . . . and, real good root beer. Real root beer!

 

B:         So he was quite the outdoors person, too.

 

F:         Yes.  Oh, yes.  Oh, woods!!   You couldn't lose him in the woods.  He had is mind on where he was all the time, you know.  He'd go up in the big woods.   He used to have a hunting camp . . . oh . . . way back.  They said about ten miles.  And they'd hike it back there.   Take their tent and all their meals.  They had to go across a river.  There was . . . ah . . . they lived in Knapp Station but their father lived up in . . . .ah   . . . I believe it was a hollywood area.  He would take them across the river.

 

B:         Now this is whose father?

 

F:         Huh?

 

B:         Who is this who would take them across the river?

 

F:         Kingsley.  Kingsley.   Eh ya, ya.   He would take them across in the boats.  Sometimes he'd have to make two or three trips.  Then when they'd come back, why they'd stop on the other side and keep yellin' 'til they got his attention.   And he'd come over and get 'em and bring 'em back.

 

B:         So did he [Edson Morgan]  hunt a lot too?

 

F:         Yes.  He loved hunting.  He loved hunting.   He would get a dear occasionally.  No a lot of them.  No a lot of them.  But . . . ah . . .

 

R:        Wood lot.  He loved to work with wood.

 

F:         Yeah.  On our wood lot up there, he'd go up there, you know, and he'd cut wood like nobody's business.   He liked it.  Well, when he got it home it was a different story.  He didn't like to get it up into stove wood.   Ah . . . at one time there in Norwood . . . well, I guess probably it's when we lived there with Grandpa Morgan [Quartus Morgan], it was told around that he [Edson Morgan] was a lazy, lazy man.  Lazy good for nothing.  He did change jobs.   He never held a job for very long.  Ah, he changed jobs a lot.  Ah . . .since his death we've often wondered if he wasn't a pretty sick man then.   Now he never was a fleshy man.  Always skin and bones.  Never . . . we always wondered maybe this . . . ah . . . sickness was with him at that time.

 

R:        He was busy.  He . . . you know . . . he didn't earn money like, you know, a steady job.

 

B:         But always had something on the go.

 

R:        Yup.

 

F:         He was good to his family.  I don't remember . . . I don't remember any time when he was . . . I enjoyed him, I enjoyed him a lot.   I'll never forget at his funeral . . . that was from the house up there on the hill [the farm just outside of Norwood, off of Route 56]..

 We used to have, when we were building the house up there, we used to have house parties.   Dances.  There was an old fella that would come in and fiddle, you know,  and maybe they'd be . . . well, in the front room there'd be room for two sets.   Then out in the dinning room, they'd just clear the table and everything right back and . . . no charges to anybody, you know.  The fiddler didn't charge us.   It was just for a good time.  And I don't know how often . . . maybe three or four times during the winter we'd have a party like that, you know.   And it was always fun.

 

B:         Would it be just for the neighbors, or family or church?

 

F:         No . . . family, neighbors, church people . . . but I don't know.  I don't know how thick they were with the church at that time.   I don't know.  Of course . . . it was kind of out of the way for Mom to get to church.  She had so many little ones that . . . when we moved over to Norwood with Grandpa they went to church and then she was a good church goer when we moved then up on the hill.

 

B:         So the dances that you talked about were when you lived in Knapps Station. 

 

F:         No, that's when we built the new house up on the hill.  For the farm.   Right.  As I say, the little house that was there was just a tar-paper . . . I guess it was two bedrooms upstairs and . . . ah . . . there was only two rooms downstairs.   I don't know how they slept with all the girls and Dad and Mom . . . I don't know.  But . . . you go through something like that and that leaves memories.   You know . . . its just one of the . . .
 
 
End if transcript excerpt.  Tomorrow I'll post a bit of Aunt Alice's transcript where she talks about her Dad.

Bill


Bill, I am so glad you had the foresight to interview some of our Aunts and Uncles.  This is the first time I remember hearing that Grandpa built the house on the hill.  I remember being there when I was very young, and the wind would be blowing and whistling.  It would scare me it was so loud. 
 
Lorraine

Uncle Frank Marsh had three baby skunks for pets .. I remember mom telling us about them .. they even had names.. something also jogs my memory that their "stink pouches" may have been removed .... being a brother-in-law, these could have been the ones Grandpa played with ...

Alta

very awesome Bill ... I have asked so many questions about Gramma and Grandpa when I am home at the farm .. Gramma  of course passed away when my mother was only 25 and she was even younger when Grandpa passed ... she tells of Grandpa changing jobs alot, how quiet he was and how much Uncle Clyde resembled him .. She always speaks of Gramma being the disciplinarian and how her baking abilites brought in some extra money ... my mother continued in her footsteps as I remember the homemade bread and donuts she sold every Friday to the men who worked in Yaleville at the paper mill .. dad ran the farm for his mother (Kathryn "Kit" Haggett) for 20.00 a week so anything mom could contribute helped the large family we had ... We may not have had alot of "things" other families had, but we were so rich in other ways .. I'll take the Morgan Heritage over any and all the treasures in the world ...
 
I also think each of us should start typing our memories on Word or somewhere easily accessed so we can print them off and post them at our next get-together ...
 
p/s ... do you think I should organize a reunion for 2008? 2009 just seems so far away
Alta

Alta, I know a lot of us cousins loved going up to the farm (your Mom's and Dad's) to spend a day.  Especially during haying season where we got a chance to ride on the hay wagon.  I remember the popsicles your Mom made.  They always tasted so good on a hot day. 
 
Love,
Lorraine

If only  someone can recall the "stink pouch removal" process, I could think of some modern day applications.
Chuck
My Dad was about 16 when the family moved up on the hill.  For several months they had lived with Quartus & Edna (who must have felt quite overwhelmed with that large family moving in).  Dad told me once that he quessed Grandpa (Quartus) liked him because he made him a play area in the loft of the barn (more likely they needed to get him out of the house?).  Do you all know where Quartus's home was on N. Main?  Wayne, can you pick out any places on the Knapps Rd. that were "Morgan?"  Of Forrest's children, I believe one lived next door (toward Main St.) to what was the brick Laramy (Laramie?) house and one built where the phone building is now, it appears, on Park St.
Joan

Chuck...Chuck...Chuck......here we go again......
Lois


 

Beano
Alta

Joan .. the house on Main Street still stands .. as you go out of Norwood toward Norfolk, it is the second house on the right before the right hand turn onto what used to be a dirt road next to the Trivilino home .. Maureen Calnon (Donovan) lived there for years after her grandparents passed to raised three of her children.  She found a 5 legged ash drop leaf table in the cellar that her grandmother said had belonged to Gramma Alta who may have inherited it from Edna ... she gave it to me (minus the leaves) and I passed it on to my son Aaron ... Maureens grandmother had many stories about Gramma Alta who she thought was an angel ...
Alta

lol Lois .. some things are just in the blood line!!!
Alta

Beano to you, too!  Alta, Maureen's house is not the one that Dad pointed out to me.  This house is (looks) even smaller than Maureen's and may be right next to it.  It has a dormer right in front on the second floor (as I recall) and looks as if it wouldn't have had much for bedrooms.  Chuck, Chuck, which house is it, do you know for sure?  Wish someone would get a picture of it.
 
If Jim knows just where the "Morgan homestead" was, gone or not, I wish he'd show me.  Chuck has the woodlot out behind (Orrin's name is on the deed).  Susan Lyman (historian) told me once that a modern house was there then - (that appeared to me to be Tommie Fiacco's house she was talking about).  It had an old silo there.  Dad took me out once to Knapps and pointed out a house and a field that, he said, his father called the "9 acre field" or something like that.  I don't GRASP things well unless they are written down.
Joan

Joan .. the house may not be the second one from that dirt road off Main Street but I do know the one I am talking about is correct ... Maureen had a new porch built when she lived there and the garage sits a ways back in from the house ... the driveway is to the left of the house ... if I remember correctly, most of the rooms were small .. you entered the house from the porch into the kitchen with the living room off to the right .. I remember a small bathroom on the first floor too .. Maureen said that both her grandparents were found deceased at that bathroom door which was a little creepy for me when she was showing me the house .. I do not recall the upstairs at all ... when she lived there I believe the house was yellow ... it may be a different color today ..
Joan


Thanks, Alta.  I'll bet I was mistaken about the house Dad meant.  Robynn liked Maureen's daughter awfully well, but I can't remember her name.  Have a good day.
 
About the time that his stomach cancer was diagnosed, Grandpa took my mother and me and maybe a brother or two, to Watertown with him.  It's funny, but I have no recollection of Grandpa ever saying a word except his "good night, Kiddies,"  the last time we visited the farm before he died.  Anyway, at Watertown we picnicked at Thompson's Park, I remember.  My memories of Grandpa are just "snapshots."  I remember his removing a sliver from my finger, silent and hafl-smiling.  I also went with him once to deliver eggs and hit the stick shift of the car, which began rolling.  He caught us (the car and me), but wasn't mad or flustered at all.  That is my total recall of Grandpa.
 
Dad told though that during WWII, when Dad took the plant bus to Alcoa and did not own a car, he took the bus to Ogdensburg hospital after work one day to see Grandpa.  He found Grandpa crying, he said because "they" hadn't brushed his teeth for him that day, but actually, the surgeon had operated and then, later, Grandpa overheard him tell someone, he was just closed up again because the stomach cancer was too far advanced.  Dad visited him by bus for the rest of his stay there.  It would have been hard for the family to support him over there what with gas and tire rationing.  Love
Joan

Joan,--i was going to ask everyone too, if they knew what houses on the
Knapps Sta rd belonged to "morgans".  If someone could get to the county
and ask for olde survey maps, it might show on them.
Daren has provided me of olde maps of my area.

Wayne

Now I know I'm not crazy!  I remember being taken to see Grandpa at the hospital in Ogdensburg also.  I had thought that was three days before he died, and I thought he died at the hospital but have recently learned he died at home.  I must not have been any older than three or four at the time, and I'm surprised, now, that I was let in the hospital to see him. 
 
Does anyone know what happened to Laddie?  I had forgotten about him until he was mentioned by either Bob or Wayne in their letters.  Was he old too?  I don't know how long after Grandpa died that Grandma moved to New Street but I don't remember Laddie going with her.  I had been in the house on New Street on numerous occasions through my school years (now the Johnson House) and don't believe I ever entered it without thinking of Grandma.
 
Lorraine


Here's an excerpt of an interview I did with Aunt Alice Morgan Dunbar in July of 1992.  It's the portion where she really talks about Grandma and Grandpa Morgan and the house on the hill. -- Bill
 
 

The following is a transcript of a conversation with Alice (Morgan) Dunbar made in her home (37 Bishop Street, Massena, New York) on July 13, 1992.   Alice is my aunt and the sister of my mother [Ethel Morgan Matson].   My father [Almon D. "Bill" Matson] is also a part of this conversation .

 

Key:   B= William J. Matson     D=Almon D. Matson    A=Alice Morgan Dunbar

 

 

B:   Both Grandma and Grandpa Morgan [Edson and Alta Marsh Morgan] were dead before I was born.  What's your greatest memory of them?   I've always heard that Grandpa Morgan was sort of on the quiet side; but Grandma Morgan was real outgoing and had a keen sense of humor.

 

A:        That's just it.  She would be the life of the party wherever she went.   She was . . . ah. . . a dry sense of humor, you know.  And she'd say things that everybody . . . just that dry sense of humor, she was really like that.

 

D:        Olive.  Olive is just like her.

 

A:        And Dad was very quiet.  I remember, like when I got old enough to be dating, when I was in college - I never did date when I was in High School - but when I was in college . . . got out of college . . . why guys that would come to see me, they always remarked about what a high esteem they held my father in because he was so easy going, you know, quiet, easy going.   So . . . and the greatest memory probably I have of my father is how much he loved the Adirondacks.  And berrying . . . we always went berrying.   We would take the tent, stay over night sometimes and do a little fishing.  And, ah, great times.  I remember one time . . . let's see . . . there was Clyde and Fred and myself . . . I think just the three of us.   We went berrying in the Adirondacks somewhere.  And Dad was a great hand.  He'd say, "Well now, I'm just going to go over the hill here and see if I can find any berries there.   So you kids can just pick here."  And we did.

 

          Well,  he didn't come and didn't come, you know, and we began to think we should . . . and we, I think, we tried to start back to the car and we got lost.   And we just didn't know where we were.  And we just always ended up back in the same place.  'Til finally Clyde noticed some white pieces of handkerchief tied on the bushes.   And Dad had tied that white handkerchief on the bushes; torn his handkerchief and kept tying them on the bushes so we would find our way.  That's the only experience of really being lost.   I remember that!

 

          But he did love the Adirondacks.  Every Sunday afternoon in the summertime, that's what we did, you know: pile into the car and we went riding.   And always on roads that we'd never been on before; and would begin wondering where we were.  And Mom would day, "Well, Edson, do you know where you are?"   And he'd say, "Well, I think this road will probably come out to such and such a place."  But sometimes it did and sometimes it didn't.   

 

       And, ah, one of the things I remember very well, in the summer he always had a job wrapping butter at the creamery.  And, ah, he'd get home from work and he'd say, "Okay, Mom," he'd say, "let's put up a supper and go on a picnic."   "A picnic!," she says, "I have nothing to put up for a picnic!"  He'd say, "Well what's all that fresh baked bread there that I see?"   So she'd slice up some of that bread and put butter on it and he'd go out and pull some radishes and we'd go off on our picnic with bread and butter and radishes.   And then once in a while, not very often, but once in a while he'd stop in Potsdam at the fruit market, The California Fruit Market right there on the corner . . . the end of Market Street . . . and get each one of us a pear or each one of us a peach or something.   And that was the biggest treat that we ever had!  I'll tell you, we didn't have much.  We had a lot, but . . . as far . . . we had all we needed to eat and everything.   But for a real treat  . . .

          And the most remarkable thing: we kids didn't know we were poor.  We didn't know we were poor.   And Mom would take some of our old clothes that we weren't wearing anymore, and take them down to the neighbors that lived at the foot of the hill, because she'd see them running barefoot in the wintertime and everything.   They'd still be running out without any shoes on; sometimes without any pants on . . . and all because they weren't taken care of.  Mom thought that because they didn't have things, she'd take things down there.

 

B:        This is when you were living up on the Farm?

 

A:        When we were up on the Farm [The house just outside of Norwood on Route 56] .

 

B:        Is that the house you have the greatest memory of?

 

A:        Oh yes, yes.

 

B:        Because you moved up on the farm when you were still a young girl?

 

A:        Yes, I was just going into the fifth grade.  I have faint recollections of going to the little old Hale School on Hale Road.   I think I can remember my first day of school because Ray took me to school.  But . . .

 

B:        When you first moved into the house, the house wasn't really finished.

   

A:        No.  It was in and around Thanksgiving time, I think it was, and there was one corner of the house that had not been closed in yet.   But . . . that first winter we'd wake up and there would be little snow drifts along the floor where the snow sifted in because there were no . . . windows were really not finished up yet.   They were in, but I mean they were not really . . . the casings and everything were not all finished.  There were no storm windows.   So, it was cold and, as I say, we had little snow drifts.  But . . . and once in a while . . . a couple of times . . .one special time I remember when Dad, it was early in the morning and Dad hollered for all of us to get out of bed when the house was on fire!   I was scared to death!  I was secure . . . I felt secure in my bed.  But we had to get out of bed because the house was on fire.   And I don't remember much about that fire or anything.  What burned or anything.  And I remember another time when, ah, the dog knocked the kerosene lamp over in the kitchen.   And of course the kerosene went all over the floor and that burned.  I remember that fire!

 

D:        I never heard Ethel mention this.  She must have been too young.

 

A:        Probably too young.  I would have been real young when we first moved there.

 

B:        Was it true that in the upstairs before Grandpa was able to put the walls in that Grandma used to hang quilts over the rafters?

 

A:        That's right!  And Billy . . . listen, I'm calling you Billy.   You're still Billy to me!!  That never did get walls all the way through.  The two rooms at the head of the stairs never were walled up.   They just had cardboard or something on them, over the rafters.  And of course she did put quilts over the rafters.   They just had cardboard and they never were finished.  Those two rooms were never finished.  The stairway, it was just a rough stairway, was never finished all the time we were living there until Mom sold it.   Um, when I got to teaching school . . . well, Helen first, started finishing off her room paying for it from piano teaching.  And she would buy materials and Dad worked when he could on her room.   Her room got all done except for the floor.  And, ah, when I started teaching, why I finished off my room.  And had flooring put in my room.  And Helen had to go to the hospital.  I don't know if that's when she had . . . I think that must have been when she had her goiter out.   And, so while she was in the hospital, why I bought flooring and told Dad to put flooring in Helen's room.  And I bought her linoleum.   So when she came home her room was all finished.  So Helen's and my room were the only two rooms really finished.


Who is Laddie?
Lois

Laddie was Grandpa and Grandma's dog.  I can still picture him.  Probably some kind of a shepard type.
Lorraine

I agree, though we do need to keep in mind that strangers will read it - but, we need to be totally honest, too.  No point in writing something that is slanted or off the mark.  After all our recollections of Grandma & Grandpa, can we please start on the aunts & uncles - when I look at the 10 of Forrest & Olive, I'd give anything to know just a little about them.  Look at the number of offspring of the aunts & uncles and the heritage they gave us.  Just little stuff, like Roger's recollection from in his teens, that when he gave his mother a hard time, his father told him he was getting too big for that and should keep in mind that next time he might have to fight his father.  Roger said that made a big impact on him.  How wise of Uncle Ray! - his son had too much respect for him to do that.  Etta Rae has told me of how their father was always ready to play with them when they asked.  My Dad seemed always too busy - the wood lot was the play area and the "boys," not girls, got to go to cut wood.
Joan

Hi, cousins ~
    I have not been gone... just taking this all in.  I feel like I am a generation removed since my grandparents (Quartus and Edna) are most of your great-grandparents. 
    Since you mentioned peanut butter and mustard in the same paragraph I thought I would share with you what my dad (Uncle Frank Morgan) loved... peanut butter and mustard sandwiches.  I never got the nerve to try it and now I don't want to because I am afraid I might really like it and will regret not trying it when I was young and enjoying it all these years.  LOL
Cousin Pat in Denver crying for the Rockies.

Did any of you know my father's sister Olive?  She married Ernest Drew and they migrated to California, as did my father and, I believe, my grandfather.  Anyway, they had a pet skunk that was de-scented.  It must have been a family thing.
Happy Heart - Cousin Pat

Wayne, I remember my Dad showing me that house a couple of different times when I was quite young, perhaps a teenager.  As I recall, it was a 'GREEN 2 story" home that was locaated on the R side  of the road, after turning LEFT off Morgan Street heading towards Knapps Station.  As I recall, Dad (Ray Morgan) told me he was BORN in that house as well.  (thats how I remember it)   I belive the house is still there, at least it was early this summer, as I observed it while passing it on my motorcycle.
 
Roger

If someone can provide me with the names, I can do a search in the County
Clerk's office for deeds and then identify where the properties are located.
Daren

That's what I remember too, Roger.  Has been a long time since I've been out that way though.  Didn't the roof have the shape of a barn roof, or am I imagining again.
 
Lorraine

I think whatever it takes to document the past and or to share memories of our ancestors, let's do it ... Jack, you have done a remarkable job with the Morgan website and if you are willing to continue adding to it, I think that's great ... we have such a rich heritage that must be passed down to our children and their children ... I'm on board ... hope everyone has a great week ahead ... don't let the ghosts and goblins git ya on Wednesday and don't forget to turn your clocks back one hour on the 4th of November .... Alta.


Yes, it does look like a BARN (the roof) in may respects, has a Glassed in Front Porch facing the road.  House isn't very big.  I believe quite a bit of 'brush' stands between the house now and the road.....
 
Rog

Well, to add to the confusion, I'm sure that there is an old farm house on the Norfolk-Knapp Station road that would be on the right hand side of the road, when heading towards Knapps from Norfolk, and is now pretty run down, and this is where my father told me once that they lived.  (Also that gossip says that this house was haunted, but Dad never saw anything along that line) while living there.  Also, that one time the stove pipe burned out, and each of the kids had a place where they were to apply wet cloths to the pipe as it wound through the house towards the roof.  I know where this house is, but maybe I'm wrong?
 
Now I know why I like to take drives (Joan also).  Dad liked taking rides with the family, and now it appears that Grampa Edson also did! 
 
When I take my drive tomorrow morning, around 8AM, I will feel less guilty even with gas over $3.00 a gallon, just because "it is in my blood and I can't help myself"!
Chuck

Yea it's in my blood, too.  Mom(Helen) always liked to take Sunday afternoon drives and usually convinced me to go with her.  We'd "get lost" and eventually she'd come to a cross-roads she'd recognize.  I know we used to drive to Knapps Station occasionally and she would talk to me about a house, and once we stopped and she talked to the people, but I don't know if I would recognize it.  Next time I'm in Norwood area.....

When I'm in northern Michigan and driving, I look down roads and "wonder what is down that road", just like my Mom!  I usually control my steering and don't find out.

Lois


it must be the adventure in us all .. I remember my dad (Bob Haggett) loading us all in the black rack truck (mom and the baby of the year rode in the cab) and took long Sunday drives to Seavies Corners to pick blueberries ... ooppps on Sunday???? ... lol ..... we would stop at the market in Potsdam (it no longer exists b/c I think the Potsdam bowling alley is there now) ... he would buy something to add to the picnic mom packed which was usually hotdogs, chips, cookies, lemonade and allllll the blueberries we could eat ... mom would gather some wood and put the wrought iron fry pan on the coals and fry the hotdogs ... we would sit on the ground in front of bushes and bushes of blueberries and pick to our hearts content .. maybe see a deer or two or some animal wandering the boggy area ... of course we had to be back for milking time .. we would all pile in the back of the truck once again and either lay on our back to watch the clouds or fall asleep on top of the feed bags ... we looooooved to go for rides to the "Big Woods"  ... I don't think there is a road in St. Lawrence Co. my dad has not been on ...
 
I am sure my mom would be able to help identify the house in question on the Knapps Station/ Norfolk Rd .. Even though she was next to being the baby of the family, I believe she knows the history ... someone give her a call if you wish ...
Alta.


On further thought, overnight, I'm thinking that Mom told us that the house in question on the Knapps Station Road is where she AND Uncle Ray were born.  It seems quite possible that they would have made a move after that before the rest of the children came along.  Chuck, why don't you or Joan give Aunt Olive a call to see what she knows?  Maybe on one of their many rides, if they had a car when Aunt Olive came along, they would have gone by the house you're talking about and it would have been pointed out to her.

I never knew Olive, but have always known of her.  I've been wondering where you were, Pat, and hoping you would share some memories of your father - let us have more, more.  Love
Joan

I wonder if that could be the old "Liebfred" house.  It was so old I always thought it might be a prime candidate for the old homestead.  It so, Susan Lyman (historian) was wrong.  However, I'd be surprised if Morgans didn't live in more than one home.
Joan

Alta, you (and my other cousins)  make me very Envious when you talk about Sunday after noon car rides.  We (Jim, Claude and I) were so 'poor' that the only ride we took was on the back of Dad's hand t(your uncle Ray) to the wood shed, and then directly upstairs for our weekly Sunday afternoon Wesleyan Methodist "NAP". 
 
     As for the house that Dad and perhaps others were born in - I may be dead wrong but I think Dad told me it was just off Morgan Street in Norwood on the Naps Station road, but certainly Uncle Bob and Aunt Olive should know?   If they don't, I'll see if I can get in touch with your Uncle Ray up in Heaven and see if he can remember? 
 
<Smiles>
Roger

well Rog .. most of your other cousins including me didn't HAVE to go to the woodshed .. we were 's ... as far as afternoon naps went, mom and dad were the only ones who snuck away for the nap (or so they say ) .. maybe that's why there were so many of us little Haggetts running around the countryside!!!  .. we only had to be quiet to a certain degree but with 300 acres to run skip and play, I doubt we were anything but quiet ... on Sundays, it was church, stop by and see Gramma Haggett, go home to a huge dinner and just take it easy to a few hours ... no woodshed though!!!

Alta

The little story has been whispered more than once, that Dr. Jimmie Smith told Aunt Olive to get another blanket for Uncle Bob.  They were, and are, a stunning couple.
Joan

It has been fun to read through all of these emails. Makes me realize that i better hurry up and edit the video of my mother that I took when she was telling me alot of history and we drove around to the places that she used to live.When done I will send it to Jack to put on the website. Can you do that Jack? I also have many photos on my computer of my Mom's which I need to send into Walmart or yahoo so you can all download or look at them from there or get any that you want printed.
I would like to see Alta or someone get that recipe book of Aunt Olive's which was our grandma's and type out the recipes to share with all of us.
We also must interview Aunt Betty and let her tell us what she remembers about her parents. She lived with them at their later years so may have info that none of the other brothers and sisters had. Cheryl, can you do that.
Dick Dunbar knows how to set up a website where we can all go to carry on these conversations. Dick can you do that?
I did reply to Lorraine that we are not in the canyons so we were not near the fires. We also don't get the santa ana winds but La Mirada seems to be very protected by all the bad weather. We did get the smell of smoke and polluted bad air so had to stay in the house for 3-4 days.
Before a website is set up, we could all respond to the emails if they are set automatically to Jack's list and we reply to "all" Becareful you don't talk about anyone "behind their backs then" ha!
Marjorie

ditto the thoughts on typing up the recipes, in fact I mentioned it to Alta already, and, I would volunteer to do that if Alta or Bob H. do not want to take it on.  Of course Aunt Olive would have to trust me with the cook book first of all.

 Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.


I was mistaken when I wrote about Gramma Morgans recipe book.  I thought my mother had it but when I asked her today, she said that Aunt Mildred had it ... soooo, I am thinking that Jean or Elaine might be able to track it down .. The book I am was referring to was my mothers not Grammas ..see what I know? .... sorry for the mix-up ....
Alta  

Marge, I was getting worried about you!  Your stuff sounds great, thanks.  Love Joan

As long as you're a Morgan, we will trust you with our lives, Darren.  What has happened to your Dad's email site?  I got 2 "undeliverable" messages.  How come it's always me that gets blocked?
Joan

Alta, I worked a few hours at Massena Lib tonight and Maureen's house is 3rd south from the dirt road.  I'm going to Canton tomorrow and MAY stop in to the museum.  I've seen a 1853 map of Massena, but can't remember one that early for Towns of Stockholm and Potsdam.  Does Knapp's Rd. become Stockholm, does anyone know?  Looks like the rest of you were way ahead of me re:  older Morgan homes.
Joan

For those that are interested and that can open a .pdf file, I have attached portions of the 1865 atlas maps for Towns of Potsdam, Norfolk, Stockhlom and Raquettville.  There are a few Morgan names scattered around on the maps which I have highlighted.

 Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.


Those are great maps Daren.  Thanks.
I'm going to see if I can more positively identify who exactly the Morgan's are and if I can .... I'd like to add the maps with the ID's to the website.  (I wish they would have used 'full' names (not initials) when they did the maps.)
 
Jack

On the Stockholm map the “C Morgan” as best I can tell is on the Three Bridges road ( 99% Sure of that)  very close to the woodlot. I looked at the deeds to the woodlot and they didn’t show any Morgans with a C as a first name until dad owned it. But they dated back to 1864 when Orrin Morgan bought it from a Anna and James Washington… Their names aren’t any where on the map either. But the C Morgan might have been related to Orrin, possibly ??

Matt

 


Jack, thanks so much for the information.  I checked into what has been posted on the website and was fascinated to hear from all the participants! 
 
Even though I am one of the "older" cousins, I do not remember very much about Grandma and Grandpa Morgan.  All I remember about him is seeing him in his casket in the parlor of the home on the hill.  My only other recollection of that house is:  I was sitting in a highchair in what I think was the dining room.  The chair was kinda in the doorway that went into the kitchen.  I was eating that "stinky" cheese - limburger.  My brothers, Bob and Wayne, would try to get past me and I would hold the cheese out so when they smelled it, they would retreat to the kitchen.  What a strange thing to remember but that is quite vivid to me.
I do remember that Grandma Morgan moved to New Street but I do not remember spending much time with her.  My mother tells me that she was visiting with Grandma when she died.  She said they were looking at photos and she heard Grandma make a sound, looked up and her head was thrown back.  She was gone immediately.  I can conjure up a mental picture of what she looked like but I think that is reinforced by photos we have.  Precious memories are such a treasure, we must share all we have.
 
Lorraine, I have a wonderful memory to share about your mother.  I will do that the next time.  Now I must return to watching FSU and Boston college play their game.  Can't believe I have become a football fan! 
 
Love to all,
Carol Morgan Gardner

Maybe we should have our next family reunion around Christmas instead of in
the summer?  What do you think?  Bill, you need not hit reply, because I
already know what you are going to say.
Cheryl  Please click here!

Well I'll pass on a winter family reunion, but I sure loved your photos!

Lois

PS - So who is that in the last photo???  I hear Tom Orr gets alot of snow where he lives.


I'm not sure who that last picture was of, but I was thinking that it looked a lot like my father's snowblower...the rest I can't vouch for.
Cheryl

Cheryl,
 
     You said I need not reply, but i just couldn't help myself!!
 
     Beautiful, awesome pictures, all a wonderful set up for a spectacular conclusion!
 
     Hope everyone is well.
 
Hugs,
Bill

Morning everyone,
Having received hard copies from my son Daren of the townships of Potsdam, Stockholm, and Norfolk, dated 1865, i believe i have named the owners of the circled properties. Having co-ordinated thedates of their lifes and the date of these survey maps, i offer the following--
 
On the town of Stockholm map, there are two morgan homes on the road from Norwood to Knapps Sta. O the left there is a D.MORGAN (7 Dorson, 1822-1907 son of 6 Daniel 1802-1858) or this could have been his father Daniel. On the right is a H.MORGAN (7 Hawthorn, 1828-1892, son of 6 Joel). Near these homes , there is a road connecting the Knapps road ,to a road  in the south which connects rte56 to Sanfordville. On this road, there are two morgan homes. C.MORGAN (7 Charles b.1832, son of 6 Joel) This is where the 9 acre woodlot is. On the same road, in the town of Potsdam ,there is a S.W.MORGAN (7 Silas W. b.1826, son of 6 Joel)
 
On the town of Potsdam map, there is a J.S.MORGAN home on the left of rte 56 as you leave Norwood. This was the home of (7 Joseph Sylvanus , b.1828, son of 6 Forest Jr.)
 
On the town of Norfolk map, there is a O.F.MORGAN home on the road leaving rte. 56 on No. Main St in Norwood ( which i have allways called the "dump rd.". (6 Orin Forest,  1821-1867, son of 5 Forest). Please note on this map that there are no homes on Bray Rd.
 
There are many more Morgans shown near Hewittville which i can,t make out the first initials. But for one thing--they didn,t have far to go to "rest in peace" (Union Cemetary) :-)
 
Must close for now--my right index finger is giving out---Wayne

Ahhh..the old one finger typist…..good job.  Now if you want…I can give  you a lesson on how to look up deeds in the County Clerk;s Office and you can go track downthe title too.

 Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.


Hi Cousins.. Attached is a picture I took today of the house on the
Norwood-Knapp Station road that Roger has mentioned. It is about 1/8 mile
from the end of the Morgan road heading towards Knapp Station. Not sure if
this is one of the houses the Morgans lived in or not. Chuck or Jack, where
is the old woodlot? There is a trail going into the woods near this house,
back towards Norwood. Could this be the woodlot? Also, do we know who
originally lived in said house, i.e. Orin, Quartus or Edson? Sure would like
some verification on this house! Great hearing from all of you. The emails
Jack has posted on the website have been fascinating for me. I knew very
little of Grandpa and Grandma. Funny, but my Father (Clyde) never really
spoke of them as far as I can remember.

Hope everyone is well
Rick
        morganhome


Regarding Rick's photo, that is the house that Helen Liebfred lived in for many many years.  She lived to be a very old woman, maybe around 100.  Dad and I used to go out there and fix her tv and antenna and talk about how she would walk from Norwood to her home carrying groceries, but never once did Dad ever mention that that house was a Morgan house which makes me think that it wasn't.  Rick asked about a path out behind the house and did it go to our woodlot, well not to my knowledge.  It was on the wrong side of the brook and swamp that is between our woodlot and her house.  But her house is probably not more than two or three miles from the woodlot.  The woodlot would lie approximately directly behind her house.  But possibly Dad was too young to remember that house?  I doubt it.  I'm going to have to go out on the Norfolk-Knapp Station road, and take a picture of the house that Dad told me they lived in.  Quite run down now.  Also this house does not have a barn-type roof like a couple people mentioned it having, and neither does the house I'm think of.  Mysteries!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Chuck

Hey Cousins.... here is some info I found while tracing back Miles Morgan's
ancestors. I believe Sir Wm. Morgan is in our line. This traces it back to
Marcus Antonius! Check out the description of Tiberius Claudius Nero
Germanicus.... sure sounds like a Morgan to me!!!


6401. William Morgan Sir (Thomas Morgan , Rowland Morgan , Elizabeth Vaughan
, Jane Whitney , Constance Touchet , Eleanor de Holand , Constance of York ,
Edmund of Langley , Edward III of Windsor , Edward II of Cærnavon , Eleonora
de Castilla , Fernando III , Alfonso IX , Fernando II , Berenguela Berenguer
, Ramón Borrell III , Borrell II , Sunyer , Gunhilda (Windinille) of
Flanders , Judith of France , Charles I "the Bald" , Louis I "le Debonaire"
, Charlemagne , Pepin "le Bref" , Charles Martel , Pepin II d'Heristal ,
Ansigise d'Austrasia , Arnulf , Arnoald of Scheldt , Ansbertus de Moselle ,
Ferreolus , Sigermerus I , Clodio of Thournai "the Long Haired" , Pharamond
(Faramund) , Frotmund (Frimutel) , Boaz (Anfortas) , Titurel , Manael ,
Catheloys (Castellors) , Eurgen , Lleuver Mawr (Lucius the Great) , Coel I
"Old King Cole" , Meric (Marius) , Genvissa (Venus Julia) , Claudius Cæsar
(Tiberius Claudius Nero Germanicus) , Antonia Minor , Marcus Antonius ) was
born in 1560 in Tredegar, Monmouth, Wales, Wal. He died in 1653 in Wales.

Claudius Cæsar (Tiberius Claudius Nero Germanicus) , Emperor of Rome
(Antonia Minor , Marcus Antonius ) was born in 0010 BC in Lugdunum (France).
He died in Oct 0054 in Rome, probably murdered by 4th wife, Agrippina.


Tiberius Claudius Nero Germanicus was born Lugunum in 10 BC, the youngest
son of Nero Drusus, brother of Tiberius. He was a strange child and prone to
constant illness, not only of the body, but also the mind. Generally it is
believed that he was somewhat retarded and suffered from bouts of irrational
behaviour and depression. He also had physical ailments that included a
severe stutter and a stoop He had a nervous tic that caused many at meetings
he chaired to find it hard to contain their laughter at his antics. He was
known to be a heavy drinker, often spending several days incapable and
incoherent. Even so, he was tall and well built which gave him a commanding
presence to those around him.

Morning cousins,
                  In regard to the 9 acre woodlot, i vividly remember in the late 1940s of helping Uncle Fred, Uncle Bob H. and my brother Bob cut logs  and hauling to the roadside to be picked up. One time, i was allowed to drive the tractor and while doing so, the log upended and landed on the tractor ,wedged between the fender and "me".If it had landed 2 ft to the right, i wouldn,t be writing this email.   Wayne  

I read Chuck's comments on the Liebfred house and am still confused on where the woodlot is. I've attached a map with comments on where I THINK it is, can you verify? Do you or Chuck still own it? Just curious. How was access gained- from the Reynolds road or from the Eel Pond road? Still trying to figure out where Grandpa and Grandma lived out that way (if ever).
 
I can remember as a kid that Billy Grady used to ride his snowmobile up past the end of the Reynolds road past what he called "the old ruins". I'm thinking what he was referring to are a couple of the old Morgan homes that show up on the old 1865 maps.Do you recall ever seeing any old foundations near the woodlot?
 
If you get a chance you can reply to me here at work.
 
Thanks!
 
Rick
woodlot

Thanks Rick,

Now its finally beginning to  make sense to me !!

Jack


I'm sorry that you brought up "accidents in the woodlot", Wayne, because everytime I show up with a chain saw, everyone just kind of snickers.  I've fallen trees across the powerwagon Dad  took up in there, and cut trees off only to have them continue standing, etc, etc. 
 
However, I do remember one of my very first trips to the woodlot, with Uncle Bob, and I really can't remember who else, but we would boil water in a big kettle, and then drop a cloth that had coffee in it, into the boiling water, and make coffee that way.  I thought it tasted just wonderful, because it was a cold day, and the coffee was hot, but I'm also sure it had a huge amount of sugar and cream in it.  Also that same day I saw flying squirrels--the only time I ever saw flying squirrels, since they are nocturnal, but we cut down a tree that obviously had been a nest for some flying squirrels, and they were pretty active for quite some time--climb up high in a tree and then soar to another tree.  They were pretty amazing. 
 
Chuck

I just can't resist Chuck .. are you SURE there was only milk and sugar in that home brewed coffee? .. when you see flying squirrels, I wonder ......
Alta


No I'm not sure--it was your father's receipe!  But we're all sticking to the same story.
Chuck
We got to the woodlot using the Eel Pond Rd. Turned right at the end and drove to the end of the rd--then went into the woods on the left. What you have shown on the map Rick, is correct.
Wayne

lol ... I hardly believe that was my dads recipe since he doesn't drink coffee but good one anyway Chuck .. dad was the milk drinker with fresh lemonade in the summer in between loads of hay being put in the barn ... the hardest stuff I think he ever sampled was Aunt Mildreds raspberry cordial ... now if ya'll were sippin' on that stuff then I bet you saw flying pigs too ....   alta

Dad left this woodlot (re:  eel pond rd.) to Chuck and it is of interest additionally because Chuck told me once that our grandfather Orin's name is on the deed.  I assumed that it probably belonged to Forest first (?????).  Chuck has had quite a time due to property owners who try to fill the road in, etc. to deny access.  Lately though, I understand from Chuck, a new owner is actually trying to open the road.  Old Pat Regan spent a night up there this summer - his wife called Chuck and his ATV, but it took a heliocoptor (SP?) to locate Pat.  I tried that coffee recipe when camping and the coffee is pretty bad, but it smells like coffee anyway.
Joan

Speaking of piggies, I don't ever recall your family raising a pig, which is kind of unusual for a farm family, isn't it Alta?  I do remember Maud and Peggy though.
Joan

Thanks for all the woodlot info. Hopefully better access can be had as I would really like to see it sometime.

 Now for the house:

 I drove out the Norfolk-Knapps station road this afternoon (after work of course- SOME of us are not retired yet LOL) and saw what I believe is the house Chuck was talking about. I think that is the one that Grandpa and Grandma once lived in because:

Back in the seventies there was a teenager named Steve McGee who shot and killed himself.  He was living with his Grandmother in a trailer (one of the ones right across the road from the house). I am positive that he was related to us. Uncle Fred mentioned in his interview with Bill Matson that the McGee’s lived right across the road from where the Morgan’s lived.

Possibly the McGee’s house burned down some time ago and a trailer was placed on the lot? Also, this house is fairly close to the old Kingsley farm and Uncle Fred mentioned the Kingsleys used to take Grandpa and others across the river to hunt in the Hollywood area. Burr Kingsley and his Father were well known hunting guides of the day and could have been neighbors also.

Well, that’s my idea…

 Rick


SOMEONE has GOT to take me out sometime and show me this stuff.  Dad showed me 2-3 things once, but I am too fuzzy to be sure.
 
Steve McGee must be Frank McGee's grandson (son Tommy's child).  Frank was Fred, Clyde, Ray's, etc. first cousin - son of Grace Marsh McGee and husband Burt.  I always liked Tom, but his rocky marriage and deaths of both sons really unhinged him, I guess.  I heard Mom & Dad refer to Frank's comments that Steve told his Grandmother, Frank's wife, he was going home to shoot himself and Leara (sp?) just said "oh, don't do that," thinking he was kidding.
Joan

Rick & anybody else interested:
 
Matt owns the woodlot now and some day I'm sure his son "Jake" Morgan will own it.  And Matt is also the expert regarding most anything relating to the woodlot.  However, quite a few years ago Dad (Fred) paid the back taxes and added another fifteen acres to the original ten acres.  But the new section is mostly swamp, although during the right kind of winter, there is a lot of wood to be had out there also.  To any Morgans, there is an open invitation to look it over, and if you need a guided tour, either I or Matt would be happy to provide that.  It is about a mile back from the end of the hard surface road, so it is either walkable or 4-wheeler-able.  Now is not a good time due to the logging that Seaway Timber Harvesting is doing up there, and does affect the access road, but I have heard that Pat Curran is a decent fellow, and will leave the road in good shape (we're hoping so anyway).  However, we suspect when he is done logging, his 134 acres will be put on the market, and we may get into another battle regarding the access road.  Matt and I went to Charlie Gardner, a lawyer reportedly an expert in these matters, and last winter he wrote a letter to the previous owner, telling them that we had every right to this access road even though there is no mention of an access road in any deeds that we are aware of.  There are three woodlot owners back in there, counting us.  We did have some problems, but all that seemed to go away, when Wayne LaBaff/Jay Terry sold to Pat Curran, and after Gardner wrote his letter.  So if anyone wants to visit the woodlot, just let one of us know!
 
Regarding what I believe Dad told me was a Morgan home at one time, I am attaching a picture of it.  It is 0.9 miles from Knapp Station towards Norfolk, on the left hand side of the road, going towards Norfolk.  It is about 2.2 miles from Rt 56/Knapps Rd in Norfolk, and of course on the right from there.  As someone has said, maybe there were several Morgan homes out there through the years, and maybe my memory is faulty, but I don't think so.
Chuck
morganhome2

I remember Maude and Peggy too Joan, especially in the spring when dad would hitch the sleigh and drive the team to the woods where we had the sugar bush.  Our job was to empty the buckets of sap into the milk cans so dad could take the sap to the tin hut where mom would be boiling .  She would feed the wood fire and boil until the sap was thick enough to draw off into quart mason jars.  I remember our treat at the end of the day was "wax on snow" .. hot maple syrup drizzled into pockets of fresh snow until it thickened like taffy .. yum yum ...
 
as far as the raising of pigs go, I remember only once my dad having a pig and his nephew Jack Gaines and he ran all around the farm (it seemed) to catch a pig that got away .. oh my the squealing it made!! .. it was butchered and divided up and thats all I remember ...
Alta

Alta--you are wrong--it was ginger tea between loads of hay--i helped him drink it. He even bet me i couldn,t drink a glass full of well water. Dumby me drank it empty--not full. Ask him about it. I have a lot of memories of Bob and I , on the Haggett farm. Will write them up one day.
 
Wayne

Thanks for all that info, Chuck.
Joan

Thanks!  Tell us more stories of the farm, Alta.  Love
Joan

mom said the tea was called "switzel" .... it was better for you in the heat of the day ... thanks Wayne   .... Alta.

Chuck, do you think this was the home that Ray Morgan was born in?  I recall it being just past MORGAN ST heading towards Knapps station, but I could be dead WRONG.  Wouldn't Uncle Bob and Aunt Olive know for sure?
 
Roger

Quite often I see Uncle Bob and Aunt Olive at recycling on Saturday morning, and I want to ask her and see if she can help to clear up some of this mystery.  I will try and make it a point to do that soon, and let everyone know what she says.
 
Chuck

Chuck and ALL:
 
     I think perhaps we are BOTH right about where the MORGANS lived. I just got off the telephone with Aunt Olive, and she said the "Morgans" moved quite often in their earlier years.... and YES, they did live just out of Norfolk going towards Knapps Station, and YES, they also lived just off Morgan Street on the Knapps Station Road where she thinks both her brother Dad (Ray) and her sister Helen were born.  It is I believe either the 1st or 2nd GREEN house that sits close to the Knapps Station road.....   Perhaps this information coming from a sister will help all of us to understand a little more about our Grand parents.
 
Rog

Hey, good deal, Roger.  Thanks! 

Chuck- that is the house that I saw yesterday. I believe, after re-reading Uncle Freds comments, that the McGee home was not across the road, but nearby somewhere.

Someone mentioned once adding Aunt Betty to our list of informants.  I don't think she is using her email, but I'd like to see Cheryl added??????  Cheryl is pretty smart and articulate and if she gets going on family info, attained from her mother, it might be very useful.
Joan

I’d be happy to give tours of the woodlot. Anyone interested let me know, though I should warn you …. You’ll need to bring your chainsaw…. I figure I’ll need 20 cord for next winter and the help would be appreciated.
Matt


I think we should have an old fashioned wood cutting party…. You know, like an Amish barn raising or something!

Rick


Matt gave me a memorable tour once and I didn't have to cut wood either.  I do like to stack it on a cool (not frigid) day.  Is anything left of the old school bus (lunch wagon) up there, Matt?  They say that the early settlers cut cedar forests for potash.  I wonder if that was mostly cedar then?
Joan

You get 'em motivated, Rick, and I'll be the coffee maker.
Joan

Morning Alta,
            Started to write my "memories" of your Mom and Dad and our good times on the farm. It is going to be so extensive, i will have to get it to a publisher. (too much to put on line) I,m only a "one finger typeist" and it would take me for ever to put it on line. I will send copies to your mother and dad ,and to Jack.
love--Wayne

Does anyone remember the birthday parties years ago at Aunt Helen & Uncle John's Victorian home on Prospect St.?  I recall one for my father (Fred) when Uncle Ray came in carrying a big box with a few smaller boxes inside and, in the smallest, was a treasure map.  Dad finally found his gift of a jar of Uncle Ray's own honey, from his hives, suspended inside the downstairs toilet tank.  Uncle John's place seemed to be the family meeting place after G'ma Morgan moved to New St., as well as the Meth. Church.  How about those Christmas parties in the basement of the church when Santa came in through the windows.  I was so dumb that I never, never figured out who Santa was - does anyone remember who played Santa.
Joan

Hi Morgan's all,
    I have been silent long enough...had a great trip to Kentucky and came home to all those wonderful memories of our G'pa and G'ma Morgan.  Spurred some of my own memories.
    Two favorites:   For several summers in the 40's and early 50's, my Dad (Uncle Walt) would bring we Orr kids and Mom up to the farm on the hill (which I drive up to each time I visit Norwood) to spend a week with Grandma and Grandpa.  Dad always had to return for work and the farm, after pulling a couple pranks on his brother in laws. (that's another story)
I remember best a very mild manner Grandpa that used to take me in the green 1937 Chevy four door car to town when he delivered the bread and donuts Grandma made each morning. (Oh, those wonderful scents that filled the house each morning).  Grandma was very definitely the disciplinarian.  She found no difference in disciplining her grandchildren just as she did her children.  I learned early on to do what Grandma said and to avoid crossing that wonderful women.  I remember so very well the inside of the farm house and the little porch entrance in the North end of the house.  And of course Grandma's wonderful wood cook stove and the wood shed (remembered that with good reason..my Mom picked up Grandma's discipline.)
    Second memory to share was the only time I remember Grandpa expressing himself firmly to me and it broke my heart...because I had disappointed him.   I suspect it was Chuck, Jack and I were told very clearly not to play out in the back pasture on the old stripped down car or truck as we could get hurt.  Well you know what an invitation that is to 3 young 8-10 year old boys.  I slipped and fell off the back and put a good sized cut in my knee (I carry that scar to this day).  Up to the house crying and bleeding like crazy only to be set up on a stool in the kitchen while Grandpa cleaned the wound and Grandma put some iodine on it.  I screamed and Grandma simply said "quit your crying...if you had obeyed your Grandfather you wouldn't have gotten into this fix" ..and then she gave me another splash of that iodine.  Grandpa simply said with a very disappointed look.... "I wish you boys would do what you were told".  I cried more over the look on his face than I did at Grandma's iodine.
    One last story from my Mom (Aunt Mildred) just months before she died.  Her Alzheimer's was getting well along so she talked a lot about her time as a girl "at home".   She tells of getting into trouble when Grandpa caught her and the
Bixby (?) girls skinny dipping in the cattle watering tank in the pasture on a hot summer day.  After that I am not sure I wanted to hear anymore of her early memories.  Jean (Orr):  I am sure you 
could share a few more stories Mom told in those last months.
Love you all,
Tommy

Good morning cousins!  I think it really WAS Santa that came in through the window!
 
I honestly don't remember who it was.  Could have been Albert Kingsley or Hubert Clark.  Frank Jenkins would have been a good Santa, but I think he was too old, even when we were young, wasn't he?
 
I'm thinking that the reason everyone used to meet at our house on Prospect Street is that there was more room there, and heaven knows, we needed the room.  But, I also remember meeting up at the farm (Hagget's) and also at Uncle Fred's and Aunt Rena's.  In fact, I have pictures of gatherings at those two places. 
 
I remember after Grandma had a heart attack, she stayed at our house in the downstairs bedroom.  Mrs. Kingsley was the nurse who was there looking after her.  I must have been between 4 1/2 and 5 years old as Cheryl had just started walking, if I remember correctly.  I remember one morning being at the kitchen sink, and Cheryl was crawling in from the summer kitchen with her head hanging down almost to the floor.  I remember calling to my mother that something was wrong with Cheryl.  Mrs. Kingsley came running out to the kitchen, grabbed Cheryl, and started getting dirty dishwater down her throat.  Cheryl had drunk from a can of kerosene that was on the floor of the summer kitchen, and would have died if Grandma and Mrs. Kingsley weren't there. 
 
Enough rambling - hope you all have a good weekend.
 
Love,
Lorraine 

It's good to hear from you Tom.  I have been wondering how well you and your brothers and sisters got to know Grandma and Grandpa.  I only remember you being in Norwood when you were 15, I think, and walked over to our house from Aunt Rena's and Uncle Fred's, and Cheryl told you that she was going to marry you someday.
 
Love,
Lorraine

Hello again Morgan's'
    When going through Mom's things several years ago, I came across Grandpa Morgan's diary from 1903 which Mom was apparently given when Grandpa and Grandma both passed on.
I thought you would all appreciate some of the entries from it. 
It gives some early visions of our Grandpa Edson.  I will bring this along to the next Morgan reunion for you all to see. 
 
    Starts in the front with:  this book belongs to "E.H. Morgan"
    In case of emergency notify  "Q.M. Morgan"
 
Thurs Jan 1, 1903:  "P.M. Took Arthurs place in the office. Attended enter-tamment (?) at the M.E. Church in the evening." 
 
Friday Jan 2  Weather: Fare  "Went to wood lot for wood.  Broke sled runner.  In the evening went to a party at F.Clarks, Plumbrook.  Rained all the way home.
 
Sat Jan 3  Weather: Rained  "Laid around the house all day".
 
Sun Jan 4  Weather: Cloudy  "P.M.  Went to Norwood and then went for a ride with Alta M. Norfolk.  Went to church in the evening.  A.M. Went to factory"
 
Monday Jan 5  Weather: Fare  "Cut wood at home"
 
Tuesday Jan 6  Weather:  Snow  "A.M. Went hunting.  P.M. Went to Norwood with Frank"
 
Wed Jan 7  Weather: A.M. Cold and clear.  P.M. Cluded snow in the evening. "A.M. Went to factory, then sawed wood at home.  P.M. Put hay and straw in the horse barn."
 
Thru Jan 8  "Olive and Earnest came also C. Bell, Lillian, Mae and Blanche.  I went down to Burt Mc. G. in the afternoon and got my game board.
 
Fri Jan 9  "Took C. Bell up to Arthur's in the evening"
 
Sat Jan 10  "Went to Norwood in the evening"
 
Sun Jan 11  Weather "PM. Snow in the evening.
 
Mon Jan 12  "P.M.  Went up and got Alta and took her home in the evening.  Olive and E. left for Art's.  I broke roads in the morn.
 
    OK folks; that's it for today.  I will send another 10 days shortly if anyone is interested.  Grandpa kept a good diary for the month of Jan 1903 then skipped until late March. Kept records for April then only very sparce entries from there on through 1903.  I think you can already see that Grandpa was "courting" Grandma.  They weren't married until June 8th 1904 as you know.  You will see more of his courting her in future entries.  The entries are in Grandpa's own handwriting of course and he had very good penmanship. 
    Love
Tommy
PS   Does anyone know what "enter-tamment" is? (Jan 1st entry).
        (Jan 6th)  "Frank" is Pat Morgan's (Happy Heart) Father and         Edson's younger brother by two years. Moved to Calif in late         30's (?) along with Great Aunt Olive (Marsh) and  Ernest                 Drew.  By the way, does anyother offspring of the Morgan's             share my joy and priviledge of carrying Grandpa's name?
        Thomas Edson Orr
 

Thanks so much, Tom - I remember the Orr kids being up there and Uncle Walter "blowing up" his bicep.   I also remember my mother's recollection of how, each night before a school day, your mother lined all the little white shoes up and freshly polished them.  I remember, too, being down at the farm on Middle Rd.  just before school started one fall - I think Linda was about to start kindergarten, and your mother pointed out all the pretty girls' dresses that she had made for her daughters.
 
Glad you are back, Tom.  Love
Joan

Wow, I thought eating rat poison (which I did) was probably the worst!  And you all wondered why I am a little out of sync.
Joan

Hi Lorraine,
    Yes, we spent a good bit of time at the farm in the early years and then a couple visits to Grandma's on New street.  Although I was 11 when Grandma died, I had plenty of time to get to know them both and have wonderful memories of those summers we made the trip from Rochester to Norwood.  My older siblings (Don, Donna Jean, and Harley would have even more memories).   I do remember my brother Don chopping down Grandma's new fruit tree, I believe up on New street.  Boy did we see Grandma's discipline come out then.
    Yes, I also spent several summers with Uncle Fred and Aunt Rena and family on Cottage street.  I do remember Cheryl telling me she was going to marry me.  She was so cute with that curly blond hair and if I hadn't been 15 years old and scared to death of girls, I might have pursued at least a secret kiss from her behind the house.  I never lost that warm relationship Cheryl and I had even if it was "puppy love".  Her going home early was a tremendous blow to me as I know it was too all the Morgan family and of course to your family especially.
Love
Tom

There is a diary found and published a few years ago written by a young Crary Mills woman.  The title is "Dear Home" and its author was, as I recall, Mabel Roberts.  Anyway, she frequently went to Norwood to stay and right w/i the first 1-3 pages, she mentions simply that Alta Marsh stayed overnight too.  The diary mentions old family names in Norwood, Motts, etc.
Joan

Yes, Tom.  Please keep the entries from the diary coming.  Very Interesting!!  Maybe something Jack would like to put on the Morgan Website?
 
Lorraine

wow Lorraine .. I didn't know that!! .... good job Mrs. Kingsley .. dirty dishwater and all!!
 
I've been thinking alot about how blessed I am (as well as many of you) to say that my parents are still with us ... mom is 84 and dad is 86 and still going strong ... how cool is that???   my mother was in her early 20's when her parents passed away and I think about Glen, Stephanie and Becky (Cheryl's children) who were so very young when she passed .. Bec was 16, Steph 15 and Glen was only 8 ... I put together an album of pix and memories during that first year after she passed away and they have cherished it all these years ... I was wondering if any other Morgans have memories they would be willing to share about Cheryl ... I would like to add the kids to our list ... I am almost sure that anything anyone would post about their mother would be a treasure to them ...
Alta

that's great Tommy .. my sister Ruth has Gramma Haggett's (Robert Haggett our dad) diary which she reads to her grandchildren ... Gramma also made entries each day to include the weather .. I find old diaries better than reading a book ...
 
I also am a namesake   Alta for our gramma Morgan
                                    Kathryn for my gramma Haggett
 
I got double the blessing!!

I think that far back, Santa was still living.
 
I do remember the search at Aunt Helen's for the gift.  It was high adventure for us kids!
Chuck

Yeah--keep them coming, Tom!!

Chuck

 

Let's start one on who survived the worst trauma as a child.  It will be like our own little Morgan Trauma - Life in the ER (or not) (TLC). Then, we could rank them in severity and give out "survival" awards next summer.This would be pretty exciting reading, don't you think?  Aunt Joan!  Rat poison!  That doesn't even compare to your arm getting stuck in the laundry machine, does it? 

I was sliding down the hill on a saucer sled on Cottage St. and hit a metal clothesline pole at the Relyea's.  I hit so hard that I was knocked out and someone had to carry me to the Purvis house where my Grandma was babysitting me.  She was doing a great job. We never told our parents.  I can't think straight still. or write.

Cheryl

 Alta, I saw the album you put together for Cheryl's children, and are so thankful you are part of their families.  Love you -

 Cousin Lorraine

 Laundry Machine?  Does she mean the old wringer washing machine, Joan?  If so, how come your arm isn't flat?

Lorraine

Lorraine .. without yours and Lois's help in sending me "stories" when the three of you were growing up on Prospect Street, I would not have been able to "fill in the blanks" ... it was a good way for me to get closure and I enjoyed every minute putting it all together .. I learned alot about Cheryl that I had not known ...

 

The continual exchange from cousin to cousin is binding in many ways ... I am happy that the reunion this past summer has sparked all this ... keep it comin'   ....A.

 

Her arm is flat!  She's "Flat MJ" - in more ways than one, and so am I - is that a Morgan thing? And, YES!  That is it - I couldn't remember what you call those things - a wringer washer....Thanks, I told you that metal pole was a doosie!

Cheryl

 

I just remembered, I think, who Santa was.  I think it may have been Ralph Johnson, who probably most of you know is the man who bought the house at 4 New Street after Grandma died.  The next time one of you goes to church, why don't you ask Sherry, his daughter?  I was talking to her after church after the reunion, and was surprised to learn that her mother is still alive and living in the house, and Sherry is with her.  I remember seeing Lou Kern as Santa, also, but that would have been when we were older.

 

Lorraine

 

Because we ran her back through the other way.  Don't laugh--it worked!

Chuck

 

At least, Cheryl, you have an excuse for not remembering!!  And, regarding those pictures you sent?  I think you're right.  That last one of the man DOES resemble your dad!  Sorry, Chuck.

 

Lorraine

 

Cheryl was so much younger than me that mostly I just remember that she was such a "Valentine" girl with her platinum hair and blue eyes and it always stuck in my mind (couldn't tell you when any other cousins were born) that she was born on Valentine's Day.  Am I right, Lorraine?

Joan


Cheryl, you crack me up.  Thank God you didn't have your fart machine with you.  Love (Next I suppose my brothers will tell about me locking them in my playhouse or me lowering the iron rake on Chuck's head (No wonder he believes Santa was still living in the 40s and 50s). 

Joan

 

How do you know my arm isn't flat?  - and Cheryl's head is an inverted pole shape

Joan

 

Didn't I say Chuck was never quite right again?

Joan

 

What do you mean was still living?  Did he die???  How come nobody told me????????!!!!!!!!!!!

LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

 

Pat, you have our sympathy, though maybe it's true that ignorance is bliss?  If so, I'll try hitting a pole with my head.  Love

Joan

 

I thought great-aunt Olive was Edson's sister?  Olive is a MORGAN name, isn't it?

Joan

 

Yes, you are right, Joan.  Olive was a Morgan... sister to Edson and my father Frank.  She and her husband Earnest Drew were the only family on my father's side that I grew up knowing.  Aunt Olive was a sweet lady and, for some unknown reason, took a liking to me.  When she died she left me her portable Singer sewing machine.  I still have it... it dates back to somewhere around the turn of the century according to Singer.

LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

 

My mother (Aunt Irene) never would give up her wringer washer and usually hung her clothes on the clothesline, although we did get a dryer for her that she would use when necessary (which wasn't too often in So. Calif.  When she was in her 80's she was running sheets thru the wringer and got her right hand caught in them and it went into the wringer.  The release was on the opposite side so she couldn't get to it quickly with her left hand.  The result was that it popped the skin on the top of her right hand and she had a nasty wound for a long time.  Luckily, she had taught herself to use her left hand for many things and could even write with it.

Pat

 

I'm with Cheryl... If I had been back there I would have been her biggest rival for marrying cousin Tom!

LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

 

can you imagine a wringer washer for a family of Haggetts who lived on a farm? .. I still can see, smell and hear that ole machine my mother used .. she had a bench which held a galvanized tub for rinse water ... she washed all the whites first which included the sheets and towels ... the colored clothes followed, and finally all the barn clothes ... she would reach into the wash water with a wooden dowl and feed the clothes through the ringer into the rinse water ... she made several trips to the clothesline which dad put up from the turkey tree to the edge of the house .. from there it went to the corner of the old woodshed and eventually to the eave of the chicken coop ... from summer through the winter she filled that line ... in the winter, the clothes would freeze and I never understood why she hung them out only to bring them in to stand them over the register to dry ... I'm sure everyones mom who used a ringer washer can remember those days ...Alta

 

can you imagine a wringer washer for a family of Haggetts who lived on a farm? .. I still can see, smell and hear that ole machine my mother used .. she had a bench which held a galvanized tub for rinse water ... she washed all the whites first which included the sheets and towels ... the colored clothes followed, and finally all the barn clothes ... she would reach into the wash water with a wooden dowl and feed the clothes through the ringer into the rinse water ... she made several trips to the clothesline which dad put up from the turkey tree to the edge of the house .. from there it went to the corner of the old woodshed and eventually to the eave of the chicken coop ... from summer through the winter she filled that line ... in the winter, the clothes would freeze and I never understood why she hung them out only to bring them in to stand them over the register to dry ... I'm sure everyones mom who used a ringer washer can remember those days ...

Alta 


Yes, yes - I remember those days, too - I even was trusted to run one eventually.  The sequence in which the clothes were washed reminds me of the list of old sayings sent to me not too long ago, by someone (maybe my grandson, Collin).  Anyway, last of all into the filthy water, went the baby, from whence comes the saying because he couldn't be seen:  "don't throw the baby out with the bath water!"  Love to all

Joan

 

Pat, I envy your having known Olive - she was only a very distant name to me and I always wished I had known her.  My mother (Aunt Rena) had a long-time correspondance with Dillon Throckmorton - that very up-tight irascible perfectionist and I often found him very funny, though I never could decide if he intended humor or not.  It was a pleasure though to know him through Mom's letters.  I tried, after Mom went into the nursing home, to keep in touch with him via email, but who could ever keep up with Dillon.
 
Your mother's accident with the wringer must have been VERY painful.  Poor old lady.  I remember her better from the family reunion to which Tom flew her, but I do remember your father and family's trip when you were children at home.  Uncle Frank seemed very MORGAN - (I mean in a G'pa Morgan/Uncle Clyde sort of way) a pleasant older man, calm, patient, generally contented, I'd guess.  How old were you when your father died?  Love
Joan


 
Yes, you're right, Joan.  Cheryl was born on Valentine's Day, 1945, and passed away on Feb. 10, 1989, and her funeral was on Valentine's Day, 1989.
Lorraine

Alta, how I laughed when I read your email.  It brought back so many memories!  Every Monday morning, the washing machine would be hauled out, and I remember the water getting heated on the stove before it went into the washing machine and the galvanized tubs (I remember two tubs).  And then after the wash was all done, the floor would have to be washed!  But the frozen clothes, sheets, and towels are the funniest.  Who can forget how they hogged the registers, and we couldn't stand over them to let the warm air blow up our nightgowns!!
 
Lorraine

Lorraine .. you were from the city, we were from the country ... only one galvanized tub, turn the head of the wringer and let the flattened clothes flop into the clothes basket .. two rinses was unheard of at our house ... you must have been special to have twice rinsed clothes ....
Alta

Alta, maybe your Mother (Aunt Olive) was smarter in having only one tub.  Two tubs was twice the work!
 
Love
Lorraine

Jack, how great it is to be able to see all the input from the Morgan clan!  Thank you for all the work you have done and are doing.  I am looking forward to getting all the e-mails first hand.  I had some addresses but some I had were not still valid.  Joan, I had yours once and then evidentially you changed again.  Anyhow, I have it now.  It was interesting to hear the story about the gift of a jar of honey being found in the tank of the toilet.  I have always remembered that happening but I thought it was Uncle Ray who was the recipient not the "giver".  I have told that story many times and had it wrong.  At least the story was correct!  I do remember how excited we "kids" were in helping with the treasure hunt.  Looking forward to hearing from all of you.  Carol

Morning everyone,
            Fantastic information Tom. I have done diarys for the last
ten yrs.--might come in handy someday. My brother Bob has Grandpas
name--Robert Edson Morgan.  For everyones info, i have graduated from
Webtv to a "big" computor. My address is   wamorgan85@msn.com

Wayne

 I have Grandpa  Morgan's 32 Remington Rifle.  I wrote to Remington Arms
and gave them the
serial number on the gun and it was manufactured in 1913.  In 5 years it
will be 100 years old.  It was willed to his eldest surviving son which was
Uncle Ray and he willed it to his eldest surviving son which is me.  I have
willed it to my eldest surviving son which is Jim, Jr, who is my only son
since Steven died in 1999.  My son, Jim, Jr. will have it go to his eldest
surviving son and on it goes.

     You can't buy ammunition for it today but I was so fortunate to be able
to  buy 200 casings.  You can still buy the bullets and caps for it.  I was
also fortunate to be able to purchase the "loading dies" so there should be
plenty of ammo for the future generations.  WHAT A TREASURE I HAVE.

     I also had the deer head which was the last buck that Grandpa Morgan
shot and had it mounted.  Grandma Morgan had it willed to me in that I had
asked her for it when I was just a little guy.  When Roger and I sold the
camp in Long Lake, Roger's boy Mike wanted it and still has it.  It is still
in very good shape.

     I too appreciate all you are doing to keep the memories of the Morgan's
going.  THANKS SO VERY MUCH.

Jim Morgan


     Here is another funny story that was told to me that happened at your
house when we were just kids.  Although it is not about Grandpa and Grandma,
it is about your Mother and your Uncle Ray.

     Your Uncle Ray was working either at your place or somewhere in Norwood
and went to your house for lunch.  Your Mom served pie, and your Uncle Ray
made it look like the crust was tough and worked hard to cut the crust.  I
understand that you kids were really getting b big laugh out of it.

     The next day, Uncle Ray returned to your home and your Mother served
pie again, and put a piece of cardboard under his piece.  Dad said that he
struggled trying to cut through the crust and didn't know what to say,
thinking that it was a tough crust.  I understand that you kids understood
what your Mom had done and began to laugh at him trying to cut through the
crust.  It sure backfired on your Uncle Ray.

     Do any of you kids remember this?

Jim


     Many years ago in the summer, when Cheryl (Breakey) was in college, I took her to
McCarthy's Restaurant in Canton for dinner.  The vegetable was fresh garden
spinach.  As Cheryl was eating her spinach, she came onto a cooked, large
black cricket in the spinach.  She was horrified.

    I got out of the meal cheaply.  They gave us our dinners.  How about
that.

Jim Morgan

I will share a few things that I remember but I am sure there are many
more that I will think of and will share with everyone as I remember them.

     I remember going to the farm many times, but I especially remember one
winter when Dad carried me up in a pack basket on his back because the road
leading to the farm was drifted full of snow.  I just drove up there
recently and how it has changed with houses all the way up the road which
were not there when I was a kid.

     When Grandpa Morgan died, I remember Dad taking me to the house and
picking me up so I could look in the Casket.  Although I was very young, I
remember it as it were yesterday.  It left a lasting impression on me.  It
was the first time I had ever experienced that.

     I also remember when Grandma moved to the village and going to see her
many times and enjoyed her cookies and other goodies.  She referred to me at
the "question box" because I apparently always asked her a million questions
when there.

     I also remember riding the steam train, the Norwood-St. Lawrence
Railroad from Norfork to Norwood with Etta Rae to see Grandma.  It cost 15
cents to ride both ways.

Jim Morgan

Roger, myself and our wives went to California shortly after Uncle
Frank Morgan died.  We did look up Aunt Irene and I don't remember who she
was staying with at the time.  We also went to the cemetery where Uncle
Frank was buried.  It was a huge, beautiful cemetery where many stars are
buried.
Jim Morgan



Been reading all your mail about galvanized wash tubs, wringers,(arms
being caught in wringers}, hanging out to dry, and etc. Bet you have
never had your Saturday nite bath in a copper boiler tub with water
heated by a kerosene stove. My brother Bob and i had to get out of the
tub and stand shivering while mother put in the rinse water. Thank the
lord she didn,t own a "wringer"--she dried us off with a towel. Didn,t
have to hang on a line either. :-)))
Wayne

Morning everyone,
            Fantastic information Tom. I have done diarys for the last
ten yrs.--might come in handy someday. My brother Bob has Grandpas
name--Robert Edson Morgan. 
Wayne


You're wrong Wayne!!!   I don't actually remember, but have pictures of me
in one of those tubs on a camping trip!!

Lorraine

sharing the name of Grandpa Morgans brother---Wayne "Arthur" Morgan

Lorraine,
           Can you send the picture of you in the copper boiler tub to
Jack to post on "Lorraines Photos" ? Or is it too pornographic to send
over the internet?

Wayne

Welcome, Carol.  So great that you are "one of us" again!  Love
Joan

Hi Wayne - After I wrote that message, I got to thinking and it wasn't me in
the tub, it was Cheryl.  I don't think I have it any longer but I'm going to
look and see what I can find.  I suspect that one of her children has the
picture, AND IT IS NOT pornographic!!  Now, I DO have a picture of me from
the waist up at about age 3, probably, sitting in a white enamel tub, but
will not send it to Jack.  Afterall, we don't want the website to be closed
down.

Lorraine

I remember going up to the farm and seeing all those clothes hanging out on the clothesline!  And I remember our own wringer washer contraption set-up on Prospect St every Monday morning.  I bet Aunt Olive had to wash more than once a week with your big family!  And by the way, didn't those frozen clothes smell just grand?  I still have a clothesline at our cottage and still love the smell from  cold, wind-blown sheets!  (but frozen sheets is out of the question - I resort to the dryer when it comes to fr fr fr freezing temps)

Lois

Tom and everyone,
 
Back in the late '90's I stopped into Aunt Mildred's and Uncle Walt's for a visit.  Part of our conversation was about Grandma and Grandpa Morgan.  Tom, I so wanted your Mom to open up and talk about them, but she was rather quiet that day, and didn't seem interested in talking too much about that time of her life.  I'm glad that before she died she did tell you some stories and I (we) would love to hear all of them.  One story your Dad did tell me was about a time he was up on the farm.  I think he and your Mom had just gotten married.  He told of how Grandma made him get down on the floor on his hands and knees and made him touch his forehead to the floor.  [note to everyone:  Uncle Walt not only told me this story, he demonstrated it.  Well into his 90's he lept to the floor while he was telling this story and acted it out!]  His instructions from Grandma were to repeat line for line the words she gave him.  Mind you, Uncle Walt is hands and knees on the floor with his forehead touching the floor.
 
Grandma:  I know my heart,
Uncle Walt:  I know my heart,
 
Grandma:  I know my mind.
Uncle Walt:  I know my mind.
 
Grandma:  I know that I
Uncle Walt: I know that I
 
Grandma: stick up behind!
Uncle Walt:  stick up behind!
 
How we laughed when Uncle Walt told that story.  He said Grandma was always looking for opportunities to make people laugh.  But from other stories told, it seems that she also knew how to manage kids!
 
love and hugs to all,
Bill

I'm thinking I might be the oldest cousin to be named after Grandma.
Lorraine Alta - I don't know where the Lorraine came from - I only knew of
one other all the time I was growing up.

Lorraine

Tom (everyone),
 
This is so great!  More please!!
 
I'm not sure if anyone answered your question.  I think Grandpa meant "entertainment" when he wrote "entertamment."  That's probably they way he pronounced it and was spelling it out phonetically.  My Dad (Bill Matson) always called Binghamton, NY,  "Bimmington."  We always corrected him and teased him about it, but until the day he died I think he always said "Bimmington."  Once you start pronouncing a word a certain way it's hard to change, I guess.
 
-- Bill

moms day to wash was usually Saturday and I don't remember her washing more than once a week ... our Saturday night baths before we got "running water" were taken in the kitchen sink.  mom heated the water on her wood stove and I doubt the water got changed with each child ... mmmm, now I know why there was more than one in the sink ... once we did get running water piped into the farmhouse, we still took baths 3 at a time .. didn't matter if you were a brother or sister ... if you were dirty by weeks end (sheesh, no way on a farm  ) you were put in the tub ..

when I was in grade school, I didn't like my name .. I wanted to have a name like all the other girls ... I thought my name was "dumb" ... and besides, no one except relatives could pronounce it correctly ... as time goes on, I realize how special my name is and how remarkable our grandmother was.  I did not know her as she had passed away two years before I was born ... So, for those of you who went to the "woodshed" to be disciplined, for those who rode with Grandpa to go sell her baked goods and for those who got to sit on her lap, I trust you feel blest to have had those opportunities ... those of us who did not have the priviledge, we can only imagine ... oh, and BTW, I absolutely love my name .. so much that I passed it on to my daughter ...
Alta
Alta, it's funny, but I always hated my middle name also.  It wasn't until I was working in Schenectady that friends, when they learned what my middle name was, and how much I hated it, began to call me by my middle name, and still do to this day.  Pretty soon it didn't bother me, and now I feel proud to have the name of Alta, even if it's only my middle name.
 
Love,
Lorraine

Yes, Joan you are right!  Great Aunt Olive was not a Marsh as I said but was in fact Grandpa Edison's sister.  Pat was one of the few of us cousins to know her well.
Tom

One summer I was reading a book titled "The Christian's Secret of a Happy Life by Hannah Whitall Smith. Cheryl visited us a t camp that summer I was reading it and asked if she could read it too. I believe I lent her the book and she later shared with me that it was this book that was instrumental in her placing her faith in Jesus Christ and giving her life to him.
Marjorie


Joan and all ~
    Aunt Olive was a very dear lady and, as I mentioned before, my only link to the Morgans as I grew up in Southern California.  I remember going to her house frequently for dinner.  She and Uncle Ern had the neatest box of toys and I would sit in the corner of the living room and play with them for hours.  I was a very quiet little girl (no comments from the peanut gallery, Tom!) and maybe that is why she took a liking to me.
    I may be the last relative that has not given up on Dillon Throckmorton.  He had to give up email several years ago and I used to contact him through his wife Irene's email.  However, she has gone blind so we have reverted to snail mail.  I agree with your description of Dillon, but during the time we were emailing I learned to really love him.  Although he tends to be a little eccentric, he was always supportive, caring and non-critical when I would share the things that were going on in my life.  That endeared him to me.  As for his sense of humor, I think it was intentional.  I was privileged to know his mother and father as they visited my parents occasionally.  Did you all know that his father was instrumental in promoting the Heifer Project?  (If you don't know what it is, you can look it up online at www.heifer.org.)
    Talking about wringer washers brought back another memory for me and I share it to show what a sweet man my father was.  When I was twelve I decided to surprise my mother and do the laundry.  I washed my father's white long underwear (being from upstate NY he always wore them in the winter even though we lived in So. Calif.) with my bright pink chenille bathrobe.  Then I proceeded to hang his now pink underwear on the clothesline for all the neighbors to see.  He never said a word about it and, yes, he wore the pink underwear.  My father was the most kind, gentle, patient, loving man I have ever known... a true Morgan.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

I have to comment that, being a generation removed from most of you, I am really enjoying all the old stories.  Many of the names and faces are only a blur as I was only 8 when we moved out of norwood in 1958.  It was great to see some of you at the reunion and it is great to be included in this chain.
 
Daren

Cousins, one and all - Jack called to my attention tonight that all of us but Pat, have failed him.  We are asked, if responding to anyone in particular, such as Wayne's request for Lorraine's bathtub picture, to begin our email with "Lorraine," and to sign your name, "Wayne."  ALSO, we were asked to switch to the new "TO" list by using "reply all" from JACK'S site (I missed that request totally).  Pat got it right - from now on you can respond to all on list by "replying all" right here from the site that Pat has started.  Hope you don't mind, but this site has 33 names on it now while the other sites were a bit hit or miss.  Love you Pat - you're so smart!
Joan

Joan, you forgot to sign your mail so, I did!
Jack

Daren, I find your presence very exciting and your contributions to our family history are much appreciated.  Anyone who could, but refuses, to disassociate from us deserves a medal and our many thanks.  Love, Joan

Pat, you have won my heart with your description of your father, my Uncle Frank.  Wearing pink underwear to avoid hurting his daughter is just what I think a man should do.  Also, I'm glad to hear of your kindness to and appreciation of Dillon.  How is Dillon's health now? Love, Joan

Joan and Jack ~
    Thank you for the kudos... every once in a while I do things right.
    I sure do love all of this exchange between us and am so happy to be a part of it.
Pat

Joan ~
    I am glad I could help you know your Uncle Frank a little better.  He was, indeed, a very remarkable man.
    Dillon seems to be doing well health wise.  It is quite a burden for him to take care of his wife's every need, but he does what needs to be done and doesn't complain much.  He often mentions how hard it would be for him to cope with losing his sight so he does what he can to make life easier for Irene.  Beneath that "up-tight irascible perfectionism" exterior is a loving, caring man.  It is too bad not many people got to see that side of him.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Wow!  Now at age 70 I find out all these cousin that wanted to marry me?  Where are my reverse aging pills?
Tom

I was one of the few of the cousins that had the wonderful opportunity to get to know Pat's parents, Uncle Frank and Aunt Irene during my 2 year Navy duty in the LA area.  We were able to spend many Sundays visiting them.  And Joan, you are right...Uncle Frank was so much like Grandpa and Uncle Clyde could have been a twin..both in looks and personality.  I grew to love that whole part of the Morgan family including the four kids.  I have some stories to tell about Pat which I will hold for the right time, Cousins.  But if there ever was a clone of the Norwood Morgan family in California, Uncle Frank's family was it.  I always felt I was back in Norwood during those two years of visiting the Baldwin Park, CA  Morgan's. 
Tom

Wayne,
    Didn't have our Sat night baths in a copper tub but Mom put us all through the round galvanized tub each Sat.  But there were 6 of us at that time and that water was a little dirty by the time I got in....I think Mom held me for last as I loved the outside play in the dirt piles.  And yes, ours was water heated on the stove, tub in front of the stove but I can't remember the rinses.  Was that a luxury?
Tom

Pat, I can remember times when Aunt Irene and Uncle Frank visited in Norwood.  We always got excited whenever your family visited.  Maybe it was only once or twice but I do remember.  I cannot remember all of your names.  I am pretty sure one of you was close to my age which is 69 at the present.  Seems like there was a son named Edwin?  sure is nice to get acquainted again!  Love to all, Carol

Hi Tom, apparently you got a message from Wayne that I have not seen.  Is he one of those who is not hitting the reply all button?  (think I did that also when I replied to Lorraine's message to me, but I have learned now.)  Please tell my brother I would like to see what secrets he is revealing to the rest of the family.  I am so sorry I missed that reunion.  It won't happen again!  Love, Carol

Carol ... this is Alta .. we're sorry you missed the reunion also .. We all talked of another in the year 2009 but with all this fun we are having, perhaps one in the summer of 2008 is in order .. I need everyones feedback so plans can get underway ... mom said that the "farm" is ok for us to congregate if that is the consensus .... good to hear from you Carol ... it's cool and cloudy in Seattle .. high winds and rain by early morning but what the hey, it beats SNOW!!!!! ..... alta

Alta and Everyone Else - Why wait until next summer?  Come on down to Florida this winter.
 
Love,
Lorraine

Bill,
    First, thanks for that story that Dad told and acted out about his visit to Grandma's and the floor act.  I had never heard Dad mention that.  I am convinced that memories of the earlier years returned to both Mom and Dad as dementia began to set in.  God's gift to us descendents to offset the pain of watching the disease take it's course.
    As to the entry on "enter-tamment" in Grandpa's diary..you are correct.  I looked back and I can now see that by adding the dot over the "i" in the word, it becomes entertainment.  Thanks!  More entry's to following shortly.
    This is all such a terrific exchange for all of us.  I see some new addressees on Jack's latest listing..welcome Carol and my sister Linda.  You have got to hit the Morgan website and see all the fun we have been having the past few weeks.
Love you all,
Tom

Bill,
    First, thanks for that story that Dad told and acted out about his visit to Grandma's and the floor act.  I had never heard Dad mention that.  I am convinced that memories of the earlier years returned to both Mom and Dad as dementia began to set in.  God's gift to us descendents to offset the pain of watching the disease take it's course.
    As to the entry on "enter-tamment" in Grandpa's diary..you are correct.  I looked back and I can now see that by adding the dot over the "i" in the word, it becomes entertainment.  Thanks!  More entry's to following shortly.
    This is all such a terrific exchange for all of us.  I see some new addressees on Jack's latest listing..welcome Carol and my sister Linda.  You have got to hit the Morgan website and see all the fun we have been having the past few weeks.
Love you all,
Tom

Hi again Pat,
    As to our links to the Morgan clan...yes we are all from the
Quartus and Edna family line.  The difference that might be confusing you is that you are of the generation before most of us.  You are actually first cousin to Edson and Alta's (our grandparents) offspring which are our parents.  Most of us including me, are actually your second cousins in that we are one generation behind you.  Does that make it clear?
    There are some cousins that would be 3rd cousins to you, being offspring from my generation.
Tom

lorraine, if I could talk mom and dad into a trip south, a reunion in Florida sounds like a great idea  .. Ruth and Terry spend three months of the winter at Hilton Head and they can't talk them into a vacation there .. it's getting more difficult for mom to travel so her living room has become her place of comfort .. now dad? .. he's another story .... alta 


Tom .. you beat me to it with that great explanation to Pat .... my mom (Olive) and Aunt Betty Kirk are the two youngest children of Edson and Alta ... Aunt Betty is 80 and mom is 84 (20 years older than you Pat) .. they would be the closest in age to you and are your first cousins ... I think Aunt Ethel would have been the next in the line up with Aunt Helen Breakey being the oldest. 
  
Pat, I have a question ... did your dad marry late in life or was your mom a second marriage for him?   I vaguely remember Uncle Frank and certainly remember our charming Aunt Irene at the 1988 reunion ... please consider sharing the pix you sent to me that looks so much like your mom .... love you .... alta

May I remind everyone that Jack has done a good job keeping up with the family tree on the MOrgan website, at least with those who have given information.
 I am Alice's second child. Alice is no 6 and was married to LeRoy Dunbar.  Jean is the first, Dick is the 3d, than Bruce and lastly David. I am married to Paul Pang and have 2 daughters, Grace and Susan and 9 grandchildren. Grace has 5 and Susan has 4.

I've discovered than if the email is too long, you can't do reply all as hotmail won't send it. Has anyone else run into that problem.
Marjorie

Pat and the others,
    I too am having Jim Morgan's messages (minore@local.net) kicked back as "undeliverable".  Don't know why.
Tom

I'm working on that problem ..... the 'local.net' address is wrong but the correct address in the 'list' is right.
Jack

Hey Everyone,
    Alta suggests the next reunion be next year instead of 2009 and even has the Haggett farm available.  Maybe we should weigh in on this suggestion.  There were several cousins that did not make the last one that wish they had.  There are many of us that are not getting any younger and two years can be a long way off.  I am ready for one when ever the rest of you are.  Maybe a reunion next year is in order to catch those who wish they had made this years and then go to a two year cycle.  Let's weigh in on this thought and go from there.
I also loved the site we had this year (thanks Chuck and Jack) and it eliminates a lot of work and planning for a small group of people (Alta).
    Tom
PS  Welcome to the group sisters Shirley and Linda.

with so many of us emailing back and forth, his inbox may be full ....
Alta

Margie,
    Haven't had that problem myself not having hotmail, but it might help if you clean the excess info off the message you are replying to so your message will be shorter.  You can then refer to the message you are replying to.  As an example, the message you sent below has two or three previous messages attached that could be cleaned off in your reply.
Hope this helps,
Tom

Tom ... I thought the picnic site in Hermon was a great spot too .. we had the whole place to ourselves ... thanks to all those who put it together!!!  one day didn't seem to be enough so we got together again at Roger Morgans Taj Mahal ... perhaps we should consider a two day gathering the next time also .. let's think about a date and year and get started .... alta

Leslie ~
    Sorry... that was probably my fault.  Your mom sent me your comcast one and I set it as default instead of your yahoo one.  I have changed it back now.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

With all the great memories being shared about the farm, that seems like the perfect spot to have a party.  Plus everyone knows where it is and how to get there :)
 
Maybe Grammie could make some puffy sugar cookies and we could all play a game of kickball... :)  During the 1980's generation and Grandma H's grandchildren growing up...we congregated at the farm for several games of kickball, hide and go seek, and horseshoes.  Played until the bats came out...yikes!
 
leslie

Hi Everyone,
    Here is the second in the series of Grandpa Edson Morgan's Diary entries.  If you missed the first one, send me an email and I will send the first one to just you.  In this case only, do not use the "reply all" but just reply to me.
 
Tues Jan 13, 1903    Weather: Fair  "Cut wood alone at home and went up town at night."
 
Wed Jan 14  Weather: Fair  "Went to the wood lot and cut wood all day."
 
Thur Jan 15  Weather:  High wind with snow  "Cut wood at home"
 
Fri Jan 16  Weather:  Warm..small flurries of snow  "Went to the wood lot and cut wood all day.  Went to the factory in the morning and got the Dec. check.  $28.49"
 
Sat Jan 17  Weather: Warm with rain & snow  "Went hunting and shot four rabbits.  Went to N. in the evening".
 
Sun Jan 18  Weather: cold  "Went to church in the morning.  Alta came home with me and I took her back after chores.  Mrs. Marsh gave us an oyster supper".
 
Mon Jan 19  Weather: Cold & Clear
 
Tues Jan 20  "Went to the wood lot and cut wood all day. 
Went to Norwood in the evening."
 
Wed Jan 21  Weather: Snow  "Stayed at home"
 
End of segment #2...will send more in a couple days.
Tom

Carol ~
    My sister Jo Ann is 68 (June) so she is probably the one you are thinking is close to your age.  Yes, my oldest brother is Edwin (named after my father's middle name).  He passed away almost two years ago.  My other brother, Bob, is 66.  He and his family just moved to Texas from Oregon.  I tried to get him and/or his son to join our email group, but so far neither of them has.  Jo Ann doesn't have email.
    I certainly enjoyed both of my visits to Norwood... 1954 and 1959.  The whole family came in 1954, but in 1959 it was just me and my parents.  We were told that in 1954 all the family was told that if they saw any strangers in town (Norwood) to be extra kind as it would be their cousins from California.  We were so warmly received by all of you and that is a memory that I treasure.  I guess that is one reason I am so happy to be back in touch with so many of you.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Seeing that most of you are talking about years earlier, I thought I'd add some perspective from the "great niece from 1980"....Cheryl Kirk and/or Cheryl M. Doyle might recall some of this...
 
Aunt Helen...taught me piano in 4th grade (1977 ish)...I would go to her house and she would stand behind me and rap the tempo on my shoulder .If I started to "rush", she'd rap my shoulder harder to get me to slow down.   She was a great teacher albeit even a little bit intimidating.  I loved piano lessons and I remember she lived in Norwood tucked next to a big church across from the park.  I used to visit her a few years later when she was in the nursing home in Massena.
 
Uncle Ray...was a dynamic speaker with a hearty laugh.  Remember seeing him at church....
 
Uncle Fred...had the cool tuba mailbox and a very fun place to swim with a giant swing.  I remember he used to tinker in his shed/barn building things I think.  Seems like he smiled lots....
 
Aunt Ethel...vague memories of her living down by Uncle Fred.  I remember her as more soft spoken compared to typical Morgans...(no offense of course :) ).....

Aunt Betty....a sweetheart...always sang in choir with all of us kids (soprano)...
 
I have LOTS and Lots of memories of Grandma Haggett (Olive)...she's a strong amazing person.....I think she and my Grandpa have a relationship to emulate.  Not perfect but filled with love and respect for one another.  She is loving but can give you a good swift kick in the rear if you need one.  You are always welcome at her house but don't expect it to be spotless.  That's not her style.  She'll make the same amount of food at dinner whether she has 2 guests or 22 and everyone will leave the table full.  She decorates a Charlie Brown Christmas tree every year with the same ornaments since forever and she makes terrific homemade bread STILL!  i am amazed by her strength when I think of her raising 8 children, running a farm, and washing clothes by hand!  My gosh, makes me feel like raising three boys with the conveniences of today...nothing!!  I could go on... :)
 
Aunt Mildred and Uncle Walt...were another amazing couple.  WHen I went to college in Geneseo, I would stop in and visit them in Rochester before heading east...they always welcomed me and had a smile.  When Pop and Gram would visit, we'd all go to a church supper or some buffet for dinner and they would play cards together.  I still remember how her house looked and he was such a sweetheart.
 
I didn't know Uncle Clyde (is that the right name?) and I remember Aunt Alice's summer camp and she was really pretty.  Always so kind and friendly to me.....
 
I guess that's it for now..
 
leslie

Here's some recent pics of the farm that I took when I was home this fall.  The "people" pictures are Alta Haggett with her six grandchildren on her 50ahemish..birthday this year.  These are some of Olive Haggett's greatgrandchildren.  We all live in Seattle. 
 
The little boy in the turkey tree is Michael Graham, Youngest son of Leslie (Alta's grandson)...the turkey tree is infamous for the story about when Grandma (Olive) tied her toddler son, Uncle Les, to the tree to hang wash and the turkeys started to peck his head. :)
 
More pics to follow..
 
leslie

Alta & grandchildren
Child
House
Barn
Scene

Tom and all ~
    I am sure I would have loved Edson if my Dad was that much like him.  I think Quartus and Edna must have been very special to have raised such a nice family.  We are truly blessed to be their descendants.
    Tom is right... for as long as he has known me I have been very outgoing and a real chatterbox.  However, as a child (actually all the way through high school) I was very introverted, self-conscious and quiet when I was around anyone other than family.  At home I was still a chatterbox.  LOL
 
Tom & Alta ~
    I appreciate you helping me with the cousin thing.  I knew that your parents were my first cousins.  That actually makes you my first cousins once removed and my children are your second cousins. 
    My father was married to Edna Butler (funny he married an Edna and his mother's name was Edna and Edna Butler married my father [Frank] and her father's name was Frank) before my mother.  They didn't have any children.  She was sickly and passed away.  My father's best friend (he had moved to Calif. by then) was married to my mother's older sister and that is how my parents met.  My mother was 23 years younger than my father, hence the generation gap in us cousins on the Morgan side.
 
For those of you who remember my mother I will attach the photos Alta mentioned.  I also have one of my Dad with his first wife, one of my Dad at the piano and one of my Mom and Dad that I will attach.
 
Marjorie ~
    Thank you for the reminder about the Morgan website.  I did find most of the information I was looking for there.  I think the only one I couldn't find on the family charts was Arloene Morgan.
 
Leslie ~
    Thank you for sharing your perspective on the children of Edson and Alta.  Since I didn't get to know them very well it was interesting and insightful to me.  Thank you for the great photos too.
 
Reunion ~
    Last, but not least, I would LOVE to come to a reunion.  I just have to have a lot of advance notice in order to be away from my job.
 
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT
frank_edna_morgan
frank_irene_morgan
frank_piano
irene_morgan
pat_morgan

Pat .. thanks for sharing those photos .. when you sent them to me earlier, my jaw dropped a couple of inches toward my feet .. my goodness, you are your mom!!! ... the pix of them together is how I will remember them ... the memory I have of your dad was at church and I don't remember seeing him in any other clothes but a suit ... and your mom in a sun dress with her hair in a braid ... I always thought Aunt Lil looked so much like your dad ... Happy to have you join us Pat and hopefully Bob will join in someday too .. my mother has a pix of him with other cousins in the back of one of dads trucks when he visited in 1954 ... I always thought he was cute ... if you have more pix of your family, send them to Jack who will in turn post them on the Morgan website ... love , alta

Let me see if I can send anything yet. The last 2 were not sent by hotmail, I think because I already reached the quota for sending out so many emails. My mother Alice's middle name was Edna.
Marjorie
Unless it is because our family arrived a bit late, the most disappointing about the reunion is that everyone was not introduced. I did not know you were there Leslie and I did not know Lois's daughter was there either. What a pity when we have all travelled from such long distances. Thanks for sending your pictures. I think we should all get together again next year and at least not later than 2 years before we older cousins start passing away. It has been so long since the reunion before this last one that we all need to get reacquainted again. Tom, I would like the first set of diary you sent out. How did it happen you have his diary.
Marjorie

Hi Everyone

    I have a new computer with some business applications on it, and had to
change my e-mail address.

     It is:
minore@westelcom.com


Good Morning Leslie and others - Boy!  Everyone sure was busy last night!  Twenty-five new emails!  Just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed reading your "take" on our Aunts and Uncles, but I just can't imagine anyone being intimidated by my Mother, Helen!  I guess maybe that's because she was my Mother.  And, I so enjoyed seeing your pictures.  Your Mother has some beautiful Grandchildren!  I had heard that a lot of work had been done to the farmhouse, but didn't get up there when we were home for the reunion.  This next reunion I hope to spend a few more days in the area. 
 
Love,
Lorraine (Helen's oldest)

Hi Margie - Jack has been great at putting our conversations on the Morgan Website.  You will find the first part of Grandpa's Diary there, under the recollections heading.
 Lorraine

Well being "intimidated" for me meant that I was only 9 and taking lessons from someone who was very talented and no nonsense at the piano :)  ...she was a great teacher.  No offense meant by my comment in describing her...AND I can still play and in good tempo LOL
 leslie

I was not at the reunion this year but was home visiting grandparents in OCtober.  Beautiful then..almost 80 degrees!  I agree.  We'll have to come up with a system/plan for the next gathering so that people know who everyone is....I remember one year at the farm we gathered based upon families and took group pictures.  That was fun and a good way to introduce people. 
leslie

Leslie - Good for you!  I'm ashamed to say, being the daughter of a piano teacher, that I maybe can use one hand playing in the key of C, and I still make mistakes.  I wonder how I got in this family!  I can't sing or play the piano!  I think even my father was more musical than me.  He could play the violin! 
Lorraine 
P.S.  I did NOT take offense by what you wrote!


Tom,  The rinse was necessary. How did you get the soap out of your ears? or didn,t Aunt Mildred use any.
Wayne

Wayne,
    Yes Mom did use soap...good old Fels Naptha..good enough for the clothes so good enough for baths.  Must have rinsed as you suggest because I remember her pouring water over our heads after scrubbing our hair.  Maybe we stood up and she rinsed with a pan of warm water and that was the addition for the next child's bath.   Bath time was chilly at best but the memories are warm as ever.
Tom

Hi Tom--
 
I can think of another way that (warm) water was added for the next bath, and in your case, I wouldn't blame your brothers and sisters!  I'm just sorry I didn't get a chance to add my contribution for your bath!  HaHa! 
 
Chuck (Fred's 2nd oldest)


that's hlarious Chuck .. I have brothers who DID just that .. must be a guy thing 
my mother used lye soap ..same stuff they scrubbed the milking machines with .. no wonder no one wanted to sit next to me on the bus .. thanks mom!!!
Alta

Pat, I did get a couple of returns on Jim's mail, but didn't yesterday.  Joan

Pat, please give my best wishes to Dillon if you are in touch.  I did enjoy his and Mom's correspondence so much.  Please tell him that Mom is pretty good (at 93 years) and her memory is remarkable.  She is happy in the nursing home and gets good care.  Love, Joan


Leslie - how long has it been - 30+ years?  I wondered how "schmotzl" slipped through my SPAM filter.  Hope you are well and happy.  Love, Joan

To everyone, 

While very young, I still have memories of Uncle Frank and Aunt Irene visiting the North Country.  My Mom (Ethel Morgan Matson) especially thought the world of Uncle Frank.  She was around 14/15 yrs old, I think, when he and his first wife moved to California She wrote a poem about him that was published in the Norwood  newspaper.  I’ve got a copy of that and as soon as I can pull it out I’ll post it.

My first teaching position as a public school music teacher was in September of 1972 in Union Springs, NY (the Finger Lake region of New York State).  During my first week at the school I received a call from the pastor of Fleming Federated Church (a Methodist/Baptist congregation just outside Auburn, NY).  They were looking for a director of music and were hoping I might be interested.  Well, as a new teacher I wasn’t really interested in taking on any extra responsibilities at that time.  I told them I didn’t think I was interested.  But they really pressured me (almost begged me) to come out to the church and meet with them.  So I did.  We visited and I explained that while I loved church music and church work, I was simply a bit overwhelmed with my first teaching position and thought it best not to take on any extra responsibilities at the moment.  They listened and seemed to understand.  They then asked me to go into the sanctuary and see their organ – a new Allen organ appropriately sized for their sanctuary.  They were very proud of the instrument.  On the music rack of the organ was a recent copy of The Choir Leader – a monthly publication of collected anthems.  I sat on the bench of the organ and out of curiosity opened The Choir Leader to see what the first anthem was.  There on the inside cover was a picture of our Uncle Frank Morgan!  It startled me.  “That’s my Uncle Frank!” I said to the pastor.  The article accompanying his picture was paying tribute to him for his many years of service in the music ministry.  I knew Uncle Frank was musical, but I had no idea that he had been such an active, loved and respected person in music ministry. (Shivers still run up my spine as I remember this happening.  Of all pieces of music that could have been on the music rack of that organ, why that edition The Choir Leader?!)  I turned to the pastor and others on the committee and said, “I’ll take the job!”   How could I not?  And I had a wonderful time making music and singing songs of praises in the church. 

-- Bill

Jim ~
    Nice to have you back on board.  Thank you for the update on your email.
    So, you are one of Ray's boys... I probably met you years ago, but the only one I sort of remember is Roger.  I hope I will be able to go to the next reunion and get re-acquainted with my Morgan cousins.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Jack said last night that he thought Jim has a new address, but I got a message saying that his mailbox is full.  (No wonder).
Joan

What makes you so sure Tom did get the soap out of his ears?  (Sorry, Tom, you know I couldn't resist that one!)
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Ohhh, Bill ~
    Thank you very much for that touching memory of my father.  It has warmed my heart and brought tears of love and joy to my eyes.
    I look forward to reading the poem your Mom wrote about him.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

I am planning on sending a snail mail to Dillon this week.  If any of you wish me to include a message from you just send it to me and I will cut and paste it into my letter before printing it.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

I haven't lived in Norwood since 1986 and the remarkable, wonderful thing about that place is even after 21 years, I still see people I know who know me and vice versa and everyone stops to say hi or offer a wave.  Love that! 
leslie

Well smelling like lye might have been better than going to school smelling like the barn or the woodstove!
Leslie

Jack ~
    I just want to again express my appreciation for all you do to keep us all in touch and to keep things running smoothly with all these emails whizzing back and forth.  You are a gem!
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Thanks Pat !  And thanks for the great pictures.
Jack

I remember Helen as being very patient and loving.  When we were there in '54 I had to choose one day if I wanted to go out to see some relatives (their name escapes me) who had horses and we might be able to ride, or going to the circus with Helen and her girls.  I was having such a hard time making up my mind that my mother finally decided I would go to the circus.  I was so upset by her deciding for me that I cried the entire time I was at the circus.  Poor Helen tried everything to console me and wasn't upset with me at all.  What a little brat I was (am?)!  To this day I don't like circuses.
    Trying to remember their names reminds me that there was another family there in Norwood.  I used to walk to their house from Aunt Lil's.  I think her name was Frances and I think their last name started with a "P".  Can anyone help me out?
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Cousins, you are making it difficult for me to get my housecleaning done!  I keep wanting to check to see what else is coming in. 
I have thought of a couple other items of Grandma Morgan's that I have.  Besides her cookie cutter, sifter, and umbrella with the wooden shaft, I also have her eggbeater and her donut jar.  While touring one of the plantations in Charleston, I saw the very same "donut jar" in the kitchen.  Same green lid, except the green color is all but gone from Grandma's now, and had a Hellman's Mayonnaise label on it.  I have since seen these jars at flea markets.  I still, upon occasion, use the donut jar and the sifter.  Does anyone remember either a glass or a cup with Shirley Temple's picture oon it?  I remember seeing that when Grandma was on New Street. 
 
I also have an old crock that I believe Mom told me was my Great Grandma Bell's.  Who was she?
 
Lorraine

Pat, that would be Frances LaPelle, who was Aunt Lil' s daughter, but I don't remember her living in Norwood.  Aunt Lil also had a daughter-in-law, Ruth Powell, who lived in Norwood.  She had three sons - Waynd, Charles, and I don't remember name of youngest one.  Could that be who you saw?
I don't remember Aunt Lil's son's name or how he died.
 
I remember your family's visit in 1954 and I remember you, but I don't remember going to the Circus.  
In 1954 I would have been 12 or 13.  I probably would have preferred being someplace else also.
 
I DO hope you can make the next reunion.
 
Lorraine 

Thank you, Lorraine ~
    Yes, the LaPelles... did they have a daughter (Susan?) and a son (Jack?), or was Jack the father's name?  They can't have lived too far from Aunt Lil because I remember memorizing how to get there and one day I walked over to their house and didn't tell my mom I was going and she was frantic trying to find me.  Boy, did I catch it when she caught up with me!
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Lorraine ~ I have been planning on running errands for over an hour now... every time I leave the PC it dings that there is another email and I just HAVE TO check it.  Okay, I'm outta here!
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Hi Bill and all,
That was a great story.  I really just want to pick on you for some reason, but today I can't! I  have to say that you have done a great job interviewing and visiting with relatives and keeping records for all of us.  I would like to see a copy of The Choir Director with Uncle Frank in it. Can you scan and send us the article? Was Uncle Frank a Morgan?  I always thought Aunt Irene was the Morgan because she always remembered us on our birthdays and other holidays, so I figured that she was the Morgan.
Well, on second thought, Uncle Jack is the best for doing all this organization for us, but don't you all think that he is acting a bit like Bill with all of his "rules" for sending e-mails?  It feels like we are in a cult e-mail, list-serve type of church choir or something.  The next thing we know , they are going to be sensoring our replies....watch out, cousins - some people really let power go to their heads.  I am not going to sign my e-mail just to see if I get into any trouble.  Rules were meant to be broken.
Yes, what is it about piano teachers?  They all are a bit intimidating (my Aunt - Sandy Richards, too)...Aunt Helen always made me nervous, but that was because of the stories that Dad (Chuck) told about the ruler and his knuckles or maybe it was just my lack of practice time?  I loved going to her house, though.  I liked the smell of it - like black pepper, remember that, Leslie?
Cheryl


Hi Pat - Yes, they DID have a daughter Susan and son's name was Jack.  Frances' husband's name was George.  I know that Frances had ended up in Florida living in DeLand, I believe, which is only about 20 miles from where we live.  I have no idea whatever happened to Susan and Jack.  I know that both George and Frances have passed away - many years ago now.  And, Edwin is the name of the youngest Powell boy.  It all comes back to me sooner or later.
 
Lorraine

Hi Cheryl - Your Father (Chuck) probably deserved the ruler on the knuckles!    Do you know what it was like for us girls (me, Cheryl and Lois) growing up and having always to be quiet because Mom was giving piano lessons?  Early morning before we went to school and after school until 5:30 or 6:00.  My Father, when he was alive, did most of the cooking, or getting meals.  And, we had things like salt pork, which I saw recently down here in a market an ALMOST got for old times sake.  I can remember my Father butchering half a hog and half a cow down in the cellar in the fall.  My mother would can pork and beef and cuts of bacon and ham were sent out to a smokehouse someplace. 
 
Lorraine


Here is an obituary that will probably be of interest to this group.
 
Chuck
 

Stewart W. Powell

Fireman, 35, Dies At Norwood Fire

Stewart Powell Drops Dead When About To Reenter House

Coroner’s Inquest to be Held at Norwood--House Fire Believed Caused by Water Heater Explosion

(August 19, 1907-July 12, 1943)

(Special to The Times)

Norwood--July 12,--Stewart W. Powell, 35, member of the Norwood fire department, died suddenly at 8:30 a.m. today while fighting a fire at the home of Mr. And Mrs. Umberto Trivilino, North Main street, which broke out about one-half hour earlier.

Mr. Powell heard the fire alarm and because no transportation was available, he ran to the scene. Upon reaching the burning home, he went into the house and started to salvage some of the household goods. He came out to the street to rest a moment and then started back into the burning home, but dropped dead as he approached it. A coroner’s inquest is to be held.

The Trivilino home caught fire about 8 this morning. It was first believed that a water heater explosion caused the blaze, but later it was said that the fire might have started in the attic.

Firemen from Norfolk assisted Norwood fire fighters in combating the blaze.

The house, a two-story structure with an attic, was damaged considerably by flames, smoke and water. The amount of damage has not yet been ascertained.

Most of the furniture was saved. The firemen from the Norwood and Norfolk units kept a steady stream of water pouring on the flames from the start of the fire at 8 a.m. until 12 noon. The fire was brought under control at noon but two lines of hose were directed on the building. At 1:10 p.m. officials reported the fire was out. Approximately 2,000 feet of hose was used to combat the blaze. One pumper was sent to the scene from the Norfolk fire department.

Stewart W. Powell was born Aug. 19, 1907, a son of Horace and Lillian Morgan Powell, at Norwood. He received his education at local schools. He was employed at the Kinsman company, cattle and car dealers of Norwood. He was a volunteer fireman.

Funeral services will be held on Thursday afternoon at 2:30 at the Norwood Methodist church, Rev. W. C. Wood, pastor, will officiate. Burial will be made in the Riverside cemetery, Norwood.

Surviving are his wife, the former Miss Ruth Planty, Norfolk, and his mother; three children, Wayne, aged 5; Charles, Aged 2, and Edward, aged one month; one brother, Cpl. Noble Powell, Miami Beach, Fla.; two sisters, Miss Pearl A. Powell, Cape Vincent, and Mrs. George (Frances) Lapalle, Malone.

Mr. Powell married the former Miss Planty at Madrid Nov. 10, 1937. Rev. Lawrence Heatherington, then pastor of the Norwood Methodist church, performed the ceremony.

(From the Monday, July 12, 1943 edition of the Watertown Daily Times)


Here is a news article regarding the death of Merton Morgan.
 

Merton H. Morgan

(March 1, 1873-March 5, 1948)

Mrs. Lillian Powell, Norwood, has received word of the death of her brother, Merton H. Morgan. Mr. Morgan, a Spanish-American War veteran, died at St. Vincent’s hospital, Billings, Mont., March 5. He was born in Norwood March 1, 1873, son of the late Quartus M. and Edna Butler Morgan. In 1888, he left for Billings, Mont., where he has since resided. Surviving are two sisters, Mrs. Powell and Mrs. Ernest (Olive) Drew, Rosemead, Calif., and one brother, Frank E. Morgan, Baldwin Park, Calif.

(From the Wednesday, March 17, 1948 edition of the Potsdam Herald-Recorder, page three. Courtesy of the Northern New York Library Network @ news.nnyln.net).

Chuck

Also, in the Sept 23, 1904 Potsdam-St. Lawrence Herald newspaper, the following item appeared--
 
A new variety of potato is on the
market, and is an experiment. 
Edson H. Morgan, of this place,
procured five of these potatoes,
weighing one pound, and planted
them.  He dug them last Saturday,
the yield being eighty-three and one-
half pounds of good eating potatoes.
--Norwood News
 
 
I think he was 22 at this point?
Chuck



I don't have any other details, but expect to hear more from someone out there.  Your computer might be bogged down from all these emails that don't get opened while you are in New York for the three days this week.  Maybe Jack can comment on this?
Chuck

Yeah, he will probably tell me to "pound salt" or "kiss my ass" after that last e-mail that I sent referring to the cult e-mail listserv church choir that he's running, it's fun to break the rules, b.s.
opps, forget to address and sign this....oh, well - so did you!
Sherrill (signed by Jack)

Chuck, were you and Jack doing that to my bath all those years?  Joan

Bill, what an amazing story about your first choir job and Uncle Frank's picture in the choir book.  Thanks.  Love, Joan-----

Dillon, Mom (Rena) and I speak of you often and affectionately!  It is so good to get first hand information from Pat.  Keep well and give our love to Irene.  Love, Joan

Leslie, I lived away for 20 years, then returned.  I stood in the post office one day and Elva Rood turned around and without any hesitation just said, "Well, hello, Joan."  And that was that - I knew I was home again.

Bill, that is amazing about the Choir Leader.  We still have many issues here at First United Methodist Church in Chattahoochee.  I would love to know the issue date and get a copy of the picture if possible.  thanks and love, Carol

Lorraine, is it you who asked about Grandma Bell?  That crock goes WAY back.  Grandma Letitia Whiting Bell was our Grandfather Orin's wife.  After he died (should I mention that he hung himself?) Grandma married Seth Bell.
 
I have been curious for a while and even asked Bill about old Bibles in the Matson family possession:  In Dad's (Fred's) copy of the Morgan Genealogy, by Albert M., I found a piece of lined paper with names written in pencil and with dates beside the names.  If this paper was correct, Orin and Letitia lost 2 young sons, who were born and died in between census takings, thus are unrecorded.  One little son died (if the paper is correct) the day before Orin's death.  Since we have this nifty way of communicating, would anyone have any information regarding this?  Love, Joan

By the way, Orin was Quartus's father.  We are lucky to be thriving as we are because Orin had a daughter, Olive (if my memory serves me right - god forbid that I should spend the time verifying anything!) who died at age 21, leaving just Quartus and (maybe, I think) a John.  Joan

Cheryl, 
Hi!  You described it perfectly although I could not remember the scent. Her home was softlyl lift and she stood quietly behind me tapping my shoulder.  I was nervous with Sandy too....both were so talented and I wanted to do well. :)  We had respect for our elders then....
 leslie

Please use this emails 'Distribution List' to do your 'Reply All' to's....! 
Computer's are strange animals and I have had problems getting people's name off the List.  My apologies and I hope this new list will do the trick. 
You might also notice that some first names seem to come out with the incorrect spelling.  A good example of this is Chuck's daughter,  Shrill !!! 
Also,  (in case you're not aware)  all the linked documents on the Morgan site can be searched by doing a Control F (hold down the Ctrl key and the F key at the same time) .... a search box will appear and you can type in any name, date or whatever and the search engine will take you to that name etc..  This is a good way of finding out who Arloene is.  (by the way, ..... it's my wife) 
Leslie and Pat sent some great pictures ... they are now on the web page. 
Jack
Morgan Web Page


I'm just re-using this site (as young bro, Jack requested) to straighten out the record Re: Aunt Helen Breakey!  I, too, had her as a piano teacher and I only recall that she was business-like.  However, as the oldest of Edson and Alta's nine children, Aunt Helen always took her surrogate-mother role very seriously.  Many, many problems were taken to Aunt Helen by younger sisters, it is my belief, and on the occasion of any get-together, Aunt Helen saw to it that the whole thing worked just as it would have if her mother was still alive.  Aunt Helen was a kind, very, very modest, quiet woman who always gave this cousin a jar of her apricot-rhubarb jam and who, each time I came north with my brood of six (from Rochester area) for a week's vacation, was first up to the river with a delicious casserole.  I loved Aunt Helen and though all the aunts are SPECIAL, Aunt Helen was extra-special.  Joan

Leslie,
Yes, we did have respect for our elders...did, that is.  I can't believe that you can't smell that black pepper smell.  Lorraine, do you smell it? 
Have you noticed that my favorite Uncle Jack has me listed as Shrill?  I mean, what is he insinuating?  If he really wanted to get me he could have just listed me as quiet, Little Alta -Pat (Happy Heart) Doyle.  What is trying to tell me? 
Signing off as instructed,
Cheryl
Bill, that is amazing about the Choir Leader.  We still have many issues here at First United Methodist Church in Chattahoochee.  I would love to know the issue date and get a copy of the picture if possible.  thanks and love, Carol

Boy, did you screw that one up - "It's (Arloene & ladies unite!  IT is all we are to them?) my wife?"  The search option is fantastic.

Alta & all ~
    Yes, I do look just like my Mom.  I only hope that when I die that I will have endeared myself to as many people as she did through her selfless acts of love, service and compassion.  I was born of goodly parents.
    I would love to see the pic of my brother Bob that your mother has.  Maybe at the reunion???  Yes, Alta, all the girls always thought Bob was cute.  My sister and I would wait by the phone for boys to call us and it was usually a girl calling for Bob... and that was back in the days when it wasn't really proper for a girl to call a boy!
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Cheryl, 
Maybe you should rethink the "favorite" part :) 
leslie

welcome newbies!!!
Alta

Cheryl and Leslie - I can only assume that you are referring to my Mother's house on Pleasant St?  Lorraine, Cheryl and I  grew up on Prospect St near the Methodist Church, but Mom moved to the Pleasant St house when I was about 15.  I sure don't remember a pepper smell, but I do remember a wonderful wood and varnish smell as Uncle Bill did alot of work there before we moved in, redoing the pretty wood  open staircase and alot of woodwork. (Uncle Bill helped my Mom out alot after my Dad passed).   I always liked the smell of the house, but I don't remember "pepper".  Mom was strict with her teaching, that is for sure.  She worked us all to our full potential, and if she felt the parents of her pupils were wasting their money, she called them and told them so.  And Lorraine is right - we had to tiptoe around the house when she was teaching - mostly hid in our rooms.  I really did not like playing the piano much - like Lorraine, I was out of place.  Luckily she had one daughter - Cheryl - who had Mom's talent and love for the piano and organ - And lots of neices and nephews!  Thank you for sharing your memories of my Mom. 

Lois

Bill, what a wonderful story. There are a couple of ladies at a camp at Lake Ozonia, the one that collects the yearly dues. They mention you everytime I go in each year to pay. They loved your ministry at your church and your singing and playing guitar. Do you know who I mean?I can't think of the name of the camp right now.
Marjorie

lol Leslie .. for a minute, I thought we were on Romper Room ... only the older cousins would remember that annoying program ... the mirror? .. OH , I can see Chuck, and oh there's Jack and I see Pat .................... alta


Does anyone do anything except respond to emails?  (Coming from someone who spent all day on the St Lawrence River fishing :)  )
 
Daren (Son of Wayne)

lois ... just before your mom went into the nursing home, she had an apartment next to the Catholic Church .. I think that's the residence Leslie and Cheryl are talking about .. Leslie and Alta would walk to her house for their piano lesson ... I am not sure the exact years but it had to be in the late 70's to early 80's ... I loved the touch of her piano and played it often in Morley ... it now resides at Becky's house in North Carolina and from what I hear, Emily (Aunt Helen's great grand-daughter), has the Morgan gift ... she can sing like a bird and plays piano very well .. in fact, maybe Becky will jump in and tell us a little about Emily and her accomplishments ...
 
I remember my piano lessons .. I LOVED the piano .. mom tells me that many times I would get off the bus, forget to take my coat off and sit at the piano and play for ever ... I also remember mom making pies as payment for my lessons ... Aunt Helen taught me appreciation for the classics and I would thank her today for her steadfastness in teaching "fingering" .. I hated scales and I hated that I had to use certain fingers on the keys ... I love playing hymns and thank Aunt Helen for rapping me on the shoulder to get me to slow down .... yes, rapping .. tapping didn't work... I remember my first recital at the grade school .. I played Turkey in the Straw .. I have the orginal reel to reel tape and would love it if someone could take this tape and turn it into a CD ... anyone? ....... alta

aren't you cute Daren!! . yes of course .. some of us have to work unlike some who can take the day and fish!!!!    alta

I am forced to contact my employer and insist on a reduction in work hours .. When I signed on this evening, there were 46 new emails .. I simply can't work a 40 plus hour workweek and keep up with all this fun at the same time .... alta

yes, it was Pleasant street because I walked to lessons and there was a dog that always barked and tried to chase me.  I'd cry the whole way afraid of that dog.....
Aunt Helen lived in a comfy house near the big church and she kept the lights dim with a nice light on the piano.... 
I don't think my mom ever got a call that I was slacking! phew :) 
Like Aunt Helen, us first children, are quite disciplined and responsible  :)...much different from the 3rd child (wink wink mom) 
leslie

Cheryl, no I don't smell the black pepper.  Did it always smell like that to you?  I keep thinking that you're talking about the house on Prospect St., but you aren't are you?  She would have moved out of that by the time you were born.  Either you or Leslie mentioned the house across the street from the park so that would have been the house next to the Catholic Church and I wasn't in there too much.  I DO remember when we lived on Prospect St. that Mom always liked it when Uncle Bill Matson came to the house because he would be smoking a cigar, and she loved the smell of a cigar. 
 
Lorraine

Leslie,  respect your elders ....
 
I think you took lessons at her apt. next to the Catholic Church too .. not for long, but I do remember picking both you and Alta up after school ...  mom

lol...since i am the next generation (but the same age as Alta), I feel like I am in Grandma and Grandpa's (Clyde  & Ruby) upstairs, eavesdropping through the floor register... names and faces are all in the back of my mind...but enjoying this immensely.
 
Daren

Daren .. you could have left the age factor out of it!!!  .. you had those registers too where you could hear all the things you weren't supposed to hear? .... a.


I wonder what the ratio is of retired cousins to working or fishing cousins.  Today, for the first time, I could hardly keep up - it's wonderful to be so in touch with family.  May it never, never end (Jack must be discouraged though - how ya doin' Jack?).  Joan

Lois, we must have been special!  I don't ever remember Mom rapping us on the shoulders.  Do you? 
Lorraine

Darren, Before the reunion, I tried to explain to Etta Rae's sons that, though you don't know us except as, maybe, a name, WE KNOW YOU.  We were here when you were born and we welcomed every darned one of you.  So, you're not eavesdropping, you're being gathered to the fold - you are becoming addicted, poor you.  Love, Joan

In looking back it seems my emails are getting through. The message is because James Morgan had a full box so that makes me feel better now. I thought it was because my hotmail increased sideways due to so many people on the list. I sent an email to Tom, I think that when Mom and I were looking for a house for Bruce, the old Morgan house was up for sale and I really wanted to buy it. It was goiong cheaply. Too bad I didn't because it would have been a good museum for all the Morgan clans memories. Guess our memories will have to just be on our emails instead. I liked the clippings that Chuck sent and the story of Bill finding the picture of Uncle Frank and then taking the job. We are learning more about our relatives. I didn't know Joan lived in Rochester for 20 years. We need to start sharing about our present families as well and share some pictures like Leslie did. My daughters stuidied both piano and violin. Grace continued at Biola University as a music major, piano performance and music education with violin emphasis. She now plays in a local orchestra and is teaching her 5 children music, piano and violin and band instruments. Susan also studied piano and violin until graduating from high school and one year at Biola. She ended up as a theater major and in graduate school, a film major. Lorrain, I can remember you and I playing piano duets in our mother's piano recitals. So, I know you can play more than in the key of C and your right hand.
Marjorie


hey all .. I had a wonderful visit with my mom by phone today ... she is compiling her memoirs and will be mailing Jack a copy so he can share it with all of us ...
 
she spoke about Gramma and Grandpa and how much she loved them ... she said they weren't a family who went around saying "I love you" every chance they had but she does know she was loved ... she said she wishes she had the chance to tell Gramma how much she meant to her.   She cherishes the time she spent with Grandpa in the garden and at the wood lot ...
 
she told me about the lunches gramma would pack for school ... one day it consisted two slices of homemade bread and butter wrapped in newspaper ... one a special day she added a pickle ... can you imagine anyone today being content with bread/butter and a pickle? .... she told me about driving up Bray Rd with Gramma during a bad snowstorm .. every few feet she had to get out of the car and shovel the drift in front of them ... this happened several times going up the hill and at the last drift, mom told gramma to hold on that she was going to blast through the last drift .. well, you might know that she got the car stuck and gramma and she had to crawl out the window to get into the house ....
 
Coming Soon  to the website ... more of Olive Morgans memoires ... alta

Lorraine - You are so right!  I NEVER got tapped, rapped, or hit on the shoulders.  Maybe she got cranky after trying to teach us.  After all, she did finally give up and sent us to a teacher in Potsdam...

Lois

(Tom)
Boy was I  tempted a few years ago to buy the house up on the hill that Grandpa Morgan built. It was very reasonable and we could have turned it into a museum./ Wish I had done it now. Pass this on to others. I think my hotmail has difficulty sending to so many people.
(Margie)

Joan ~
    This could be a whole, new, additional subject for us.  I work full time as a live-in nanny.  I take care of two boys, ages 8 and 4½.  I am usually off in the mornings for a few hours as the big one is in school 8-3 and the little one is in pre-K 8-12:30.  I say usually because it is amazing how many non-school days kids have nowadays.  I am off evenings (off at 7) and weekends, but "babysit" every other Friday and will be working New Year's Eve as the family is having a party.  That means I will supervise all the children whose parents bring them to the party, but it won't be long hours and I will be paid generously. 
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Everyone,
 
I took piano lessons from Aunt Helen at two different times in my life.  I loved going to her house and playing her piano.  But I wasn't all that good about practicing.  I loved sitting at the piano and playing things/sight reading things, but i didn't like to keep playing the same piece over and over again.  My first stint at taking piano lessons was when i was in the third grade.  I even remember my first recital piece:  "Mr. Hoppy Hop Toad."  It had words to it and Aunt Helen would always sing along when I played, "Mr, Hoppy Hop Toad having lots of fun . . . . "  I can't remember all the words to the song, but I learned how to play it!
 
I was one of those students Lois refered to in her email:  Aunt Helen finally spoke to Mom and told her that I just wasn't practicing enough on the lessons she was assigning.  After a year or so the lessons were stopped.  Then when I was in junior high school I wanted to take lessons again.  In exchange for mowing her lawn and doing some other little things around the yard, Aunt Helen would give me piano lessons. 
 
I always remember her soft smile and distinctive laugh.  Even as a kid I was aware of what a beautiful woman she was - she shined from the inside.  A generous, gentle and loving spirit.
 
-- Bill Matson

Cheryl D ~
    I can't wait to meet you... I love your sense of humor, and I love you already.  Hope to be able to get to the next reunion and meet all of you.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Margie,
    Your not signing your emails....I'm going to tell Jack and he will send a nasty bug into your computer.
Tom   :)

Carol, Bill ~
    If you get a copy of that I would LOVE to have one.  Thank you.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Cheryl D ~
    Since no one else jumped in I guess it is up to me, since your Uncle Frank was my father.  Yes, he was a Morgan.  He was the brother of Edson Morgan to whom most (all?) of you are descendants.  My mother, Irene, was noted for remembering birthdays.  She had quite a system... when she would meet you she would find out your birthdate, anniversary date (if you were married), your children's birthdates (if you had any) and she would add you (and your entire family) to her card file (which was cross-referenced, by the way... by birthday/anniversary and alphabetical).  Then the first of each month she would get all the cards ready into the beginning of the next month so none would be late.  She addressed them and put her return address sticker on the envelope and where the stamp would go when it was time to send them she would put the date they needed to be mailed to arrive on time.  Each night she would check the cards, that were neatly in a stand-up file, to see if any needed to go the next day.  She would sign them, often times write a little note, put the stamp on and the next morning they were put out for the mailman.  As babies were born she would add them to the birthday file and it was not unusual for her to crochet a baby blanket and send it to the new arrival.  Right up to three days before she died she was working on two baby blankets for two of Tom's soon to be born grandchildren.  My sister and I each finished one of them after she passed away and sent them to the babies.  Yes, she embraced the Morgan Clan as her own... that was my Mom!
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Tom ~
    You be nice and stop being a tattle-tale.  Jack can see for himself if someone is not adhering to the rules.
(Now aren't you glad you got me onto this list???!!!)
Still loving you lots and lots with LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Bill, it is so wonderful to hear all these nice things about my Mother - from you and all the others.  And, I want to thank you for mowing the lawn.  I can't believe that I was thinking about that just the other day while I was mowing here - wondering if she mowed the lawn herself or had someone do it for her.  I remember after my Father died that she relied on your Dad a lot, to the point where she would hate to ask him to do things for her anymore.  We really have had wonderful Aunts and Uncles.  I remember baked goods from Aunt Olive.  I remember teasing Uncle Fred by calling him Uncle Curley.  We had heard somewhere that his nickname was Curley when he was growing up.  I also remember Uncle Fred and Aunt Rena driving me back to college at Cobleskill after my Father died.  I remember going up to the farm during haying season and riding on the hay wagon.  I remember having wonderful times at the Dunbar's camp, and spending a week or so at Aunt Mildred's and Uncle Walt's during the summertime.  I even remember staying at your house on Prospect St. when my mother was in the hospital having Cheryl, and I was only 3 1/2 at the time.  I remember getting cooking tips from most of my Aunts, one time or another.   Cooking was not one of my Mother's favorite things to do, but she DID do a lot of canning. 
 
I haven't heard anyone else say it, but I have alway though my Mother was more like Grandpa, Uncle Clyde and Aunt Ethel.  She sure was a lot more serious than Uncle Ray or Uncle Fred! 
Love
Lorraine


Joan,
According to the Miles Morgan genealogy book page 34; Orin and Lucretia Morgan had 3 children (as you said) all born in Norfolk;
Quartus, Olive and Almond (not John).  It shows birth dates but no death dates.    Can't find anything on the two infants you mentioned. Will keep looking through my records.  Grandpa Orin did infact hang himself n March 21, 1867. 
By the way, records show that Great Grandpa Quartus died 21 April 1934 in Rosemeade, Calif and then was buried in Riverside Cemetery in Norwood.  Pat...your input please...could he have spent his last months or years with his daughter Olive Morgan Drew (Edson and Frank's sister) who memory serves me was her home?  You would not have known him of course, but did Aunt Olive every speak of him?  Aunt Olive Drew was the oldest girl of the family.
Tom

Tom & Joan ~
    My records show the youngest son of Orin and Lucretia as Edmond... Tom, maybe we need to research that.  Any you are correct that Quartus died in Rosemead and, yes, that is where Olive Morgan Drew lived so he probably did live with them.  I was unaware that he was buried in Norwood, but I have some old papers that Helen Breaky sent my mother that have info she got off of gravestones when she went to visit the Riverside Cemetery one time.  I will see if they are still readable... they were a carbon copy so didn't preserve too well. 
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Lorraine ~
    Thank you for the clarification.  Interesting that the Powell boy was named Edwin as that was my brother's name and my father's middle name.  It is not as common as Edward so I don't see it too often.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT

Hi all ~
    In looking through some of my photos I found this one that was taken for a newspaper article that was done about my father.  I believe this clarifies that the name of the publication was the Choir Herald.  This might possibly be the very edition that had my father's picture in it.  I wonder if my sister Jo Ann might have it.  Anyway, I love this photo of my father and am happy to share it.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: COUSIN PAT
frank_morgan_newspaper



Pat,
    I will research the other records I have for "Edmond" or "Almond" as the third child of Orin and Lucretia.  If you will go to the Morgan website and to the Riverside Cemetery link and look at the photos of the gravestones that Bill Matson took.  On the first page that appears go to the 14th picture and click on it and that should verify the fact that Quartus was buried in Norwood.
Tom

a striking resemblance between Uncle Frank and Uncle Ray to me .. alta

Joan and Pat,
Regarding the question of Orin Morgan's children and the two infants you mentioned.  I have found in my papers some typed parchment pages which appear to be from Aunt Helen (probably
copies of those you mentioned Pat).  I will repeat it just as it is
typed and we can then ask folks to verify it. She has listed the
whole family offspring from Orin & Lucretia all the way through about 1975.  Here is Oren's (Orin) history.
 
Oren & Lucretia had 5 children.
    Quartus Melvin Morgan  B. Norwood, NY Mar 4, 1849
                                        D. in Rosemead, Calif
    Olive L. Morgan  B. Apr 17 1852    D.  Aug 31, 1873
    Edmond J. Morgan  B. Nov 27 1854   D. Jan 12, 1859
    Oren B. Morgan  B. June 27, 1821    D. Mar 20, 1867
    John A. Morgan  B. Feb 21, 1863   D.  ?
 
Joan:  John appears to be correct as you said and Oren B.
died one day before his father Oren E. hung himself as you
mentioned.
Pat:  Not sure if Edmond is correct or Almond. Two conflicting
records.
 
 Anyone one else have any input or records?
Tom

Thank you, Tom
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Pat, I think one of the last times I saw your mother was at her birthday party at Jo's. I couldn't get over that she didn't need glasses to look at photos because she had implants in. I can't remember if it was her 80th or 85th birthday. I have pictures of it , probably they are in Hong Kong. I think I visited her once or twice after that. I think of her every time we pass or are near Ontario, CA.
Whoops, from Margie

Thanks for the signature Margie
Jack

Pat - I made a mistake, probably, on name of the youngest Powell boy.  According to the newspaper clipping of his Father's death, his name is shown as Edward, and I DO think now that's what it is.  I remember seeing him at funeral home after Cheryl died. 
 
Lorraine

David, we do understand and we'll miss you, but Jack is putting these on the Morgan website.  Love

Wow, Pat, I do not have what it takes to babysit anymore.  I was a librarian and found, when I briefly did the Children's Librarian's job back in the late '90s, that my senses had failed too much - I no longer had eyes in the back of my head, a great handicap with children.  Also, the never-ending need to be alert is gone - forever, I'm sure.  I do have fun in my own little half-brained way, though, and especially now.  
How long have you worked with this particular family?  Love
Joan


Frances LaPelle lives in Syracuse with her son Jack.  Susan lives in Florida.  Neither of them had any children.  I spoke with Ed Powell (Edward) recently and he updated  me.  Susan and I were friends as children.
Love,  Linda 

Pat & Lorraine - it is Edward Powell (the youngest - a one month old baby when his father dropped dead at the fire in Norwood).  It's interesting that Ed shows up at almost all Morgan deaths.  Guess we should get him into this dialogue?  Chuck?  What do you think?  joan

Tom, what about that 1821 birthdate for Oren?  I'll bet that should be 1861?  I am so glad to hear someone verify the existance of these two little boys  Somehow, it's important to me that they be acknowledged and remembered.  Love, Joan

Re:  that record (or album) that I wanted to compile about personal stories of the 18 aunts and uncles.  We're covering them pretty well, but where's Cheryl Nolette? - and Karen?  Let's hear it about Uncle Lee Kirk.  In his last months, Aunt Betty asked me to sit a couple of times.  He was bed-ridden, but in an attempt to amuse ME, he played a hymn on a little "recorder?" (is that term correct - I think it was wood, like a short flute and it had a nice sound).  Anyway, it brought tears to my eyes because his end was near and he played it very well.  The instrument had a sweet sound.  Joan


Pat,
Yes!!  It could very well have been the Choir Herald!  (The Choir Leader is the publication that we used when I was growing up in the Norwood UMC, which is why that name would be sticking in my mind.  Now that you’ve recalled the Choir Herald for me, it could very well be that – probably is.)  I’m going to try and do some research – maybe even try the Library of Congress.

 -- Bill

Lorraine,
 
Confirmation that your Mom was indeed a blessing to all of us.  I think my parents must have gotten one of those calls from your Mom about not practicing enough because I did not take lessons much longer than a year or so.  My memory of those days is not real strong.  The Morgans did indeed pass along some powerful genes for music.  However, they skipped a generation with me but my three daughters all have the gift with their piano playing and their voices!  Harold always claims they got it from him but I know better! 
 
Did you get my message about the Christmas gift your Mom did for me?  That was a special memory.  We need to get together!
Love, Carol

Please use this new distribution list for your 'Reply All' to list !!  Thank you.
 
A few have asked to be dropped off the 'Distribution List'. The primary reason being,  they use their computers for business purposes and are finding the massive amount of email is slowing things down.  This is understandable and all have stated they can keep abreast of things by using the web site.
 
If at any time these individuals would like to add to the ongoing commentary, they can do so by sending their email directly to me and I will post it to the web page.

Jack
 
Morgan Web Page



Hi Bill, I still want to call you "Billy"  that is how I remember you.  I think I was one of those whose parents received that call from Aunt Helen.  One of the things I remember about your Mom was how well she sewed.  When we moved out to South Dakota she made our oldest daughter, Lori, a coat and bonnet to wear.  Lori and I flew out of Massena and my Mom tells me that Aunt Ethel stood outside your house and waved and cried when what she thought was our plane passed overhead.  Of all the Morgans, your family and ours were blessed to have the same grandparents on both sides.  Many of the rest of you may not know that.  Uncle Clyde was Aunt Ethel's brother and Uncle Bill was Aunt Ruby's brother so we are doubly connected.
 
Much love, Carol

Joan,
Yes, I noticed that date after I sent the message.  In checking, the papers I have do show June 27, 1821.  Of course that is wrong because Orin E. Morgan (our G.G.grandfather) was not born until 1823.  I suspect the correct date is 1861 and that fits in with your notes.
Tom

Joan,
 
Likewise, even though I was a stay-at-home Mom for several years and loved kids, I could not do it now!  Kudos to you Pat! 
 
Retirement does have its advantages, it is kinda nice to have our own little world.  Love the way you said it, Joan.  We had some good times together.  Do you remember the time we tried to sing Whispering Hope at one of the ladies' meetings?  We got through the first verse quite well.  Then when we started the second (or was it the third?) we both started on a different one.  Result - our words came out "waitch" as best I remember which threw us into a case of the "giggles".  Of course the ladies did not mind and thought we were "precious"!  Don't think our Moms agreed with that.  It is fun to remember things like that.  Have a good one.
Love, Carol

Linda, thanks for the update.  That goes to show what happens to the brain as you get older.  I was sure I remember Mom telling me that she had passed away.  And that would have been a long, long time ago now.
 
Lorraine


Joan, I agree with you.  Afterall, he is part of the family.  Charles was the one who was closest to me in age.  Where ARE Charles and Wayne now?  Are they still living locally? 
 
Lorraine


Hi Carol.  Hate to say it but you're wrong!  You may not have been able to play the piano, but I remember a beautiful voice that belonged to you.
 
Yes, I did get the email from you about the gift Mom mde for you (doll clothes).  I'm proud to say that I still have the clothes she made for my doll, AND the doll, itself.  A toni doll.  These doll clothes I have are going on 60 years old and I have them on little hangers, but wish I knew how to preserve them.  I'll have to look into that before they totally rot. 
 
Yes, we definitely need to get together.  Let us know when you'll be down this way and maybe we can get a few of the family together! 
 
Love,
Lorraine


Carol and Joan, I think you had better plan on singing Whispering Hope at the next reunion! 
 
Lorraine


Carol.
.I was thinking about that double connection earlier today. The Matson’s and the Morgan’s thing.  Wondering how the genetics would work on that one 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.

hey Jack .. good morning ... I totally understand the folks who find all of our exchange of emails overwhelming .. if you run a business or just don't have alot of space with your server, it can be alot ... I really dont' want to pull out either but if I don't sign on more than once a day, I spend alot of time reading everyones posts when I get home cause I don't want to miss out on anything ... Since I work at a facility that monitors where we go on their PC's, I don't check my emails at work very often  ... when I get home, I am flooded ... yesterday I had 48 emails to read plus keep up with the ones that were popping up ....
 
I think I am going to slow down on replying to so many b/c I am adding to the total number of responses too ... it must be alot for you expecially to keep posting everyones memoires .. 
 
I'm going to hang in there for a while as well as Leslie ... if it gets to be too much, we'll let cha know ... for now, we're having great fun!!!  .. love you .... A.


Folks,
According to the records of my mother (Ethel Morgan Matson)  the following is information about Orin E. Morgan and Lucretia R. Whiting. 

            Orin:  b. March 27, 1821    d. March 20, 1867

            Lucretia:  b. December 6, 1824    d.  October 30, 1925 

            Orin and Lucretia were married on March 25, 1848

            Their children were as follows (according to my mother’s records)

                        Quartus Melvin Morgan:  b. March 4, 1849 in Norwood    d. April 21, 1934 in Rosemead, CA  (buried in Riverside Cemetery, Norwood, NY)

                        Olive L. Morgan:  b. April 17, 1852    d. August 31, 1873

                        Edmund T. Morgan:  b. November 27, 1854    d. January 12, 1859

                        Orin E. Morgan:  b. June 27, 1861   d.  February 13, 1862

                        John A. (Almond) Morgan:  b. February 21, 1863   d. August 4, 1943 (location of death unknown) 

            After Orin’s death Lucretia married Seth Bell of Louisville, NY on March 21, 1872. 

-- Bill Matson

Lorraine ~
    Oh, well... easy mistake to make.  I know Edwin is not a common name.
    Still loving you so much and so glad we are all in touch.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Did you all know that Alta Marsh Morgan also came from the Morgan line, a few generations earlier.
Marjorie

Don't forget Jean if you decide to get together in Florida. She doesn't have a computer, YET. Hope she will get one now Ron has passed. We keep telling her how much she is missing not having one.
Marjorie


Bill, Joan and Pat,
I think your information, Bill, is the most accurate.  It seems to dovetail all the various names (Almond/Edmund/John) in the proper order and with dates that make sense.  It also speaks to the two brothers that died young as Joan mentioned.  Amazing how we can clear up memories together this way.  Joan...keep up that good memory so we can get the correct history recording on the Website.
Thanks Bill,
Tom
PS  If the dates of Grandma Bell (Lucretia) are correct, she was 101 when she passed.  That is why our parents could remember her. I do recall my Mom, Aunt Mildred, speak of her.  Mom would have been 15 when Grandma Bell died.  Lorraine/Lois..did your Mom ever speak of Grandma Bell?


Do you think Orin had something to do with his son's death, like accidentally killing him and that is why he committed suicide or he may have just been too heart broken. Just speculation. Marge

Bill, thanks so much for the confirmation of the births and deaths of the 2 little boys of Orin and Lucretia's.  I've been trying for a few years to verify their existance!  I always suspected that the penciled info, on a sheet of lined paper, in Dad's genealogy copy, came from your Mom, God bless her.
Joan

Jack, would you get me a print of this info, please, please and add it to the genealogy.  Those 2 little boys have been a mystery for some time because they were born and died between censuses.  I asked Bill a couple of years back about them and at that time, he didn't know.  I always suspected that that pencil written page originated with Aunt Ethel.  Sorry to add to your work.-----
Joan

Chuck answered me and said that, while he and Ed are friends and Ed always attends our funerals (could he be enjoying himself?), he doubts that Ed would participate.  Ed did ask for our genealogy at one point, but Chuck says he always sends obits of interest and Ed doesn't acknowledge them.  I don't know what to say.  It was upon Ed that the responsibility for Pearl's (Aunt Lillian's daughter) final years fell.
Joan


To attempt to sing would require much more than HOPE - it would take a MIRACLE!
Joan

I always knew of some connection with Uncle Ray's family too (re:  Matson family) and I think I might have it straight now:  Wilbur Matson (Bill & Ruby's brother) married Uncle Ray's wife's (Aunt Marion) sister (?  Is that right?).  Love
How is Jean doing anyway?  I think of her often.
Joan


Thanks, Tom and Bill.  To Marge:  I have wondered if Orin was somehow negligent or if the loss of a second son was too much.  How about Lucretia's feelings though?  I have read that when suicide begins to seems like an option, one decides that it is the ONLY choice one can make.  I always wondered who found him (my aren't we morbid).  What a shock!


Tom, somewhere, I believe, I have a picture of Grandma Bell surrounded by grandchildren.  I thought it was in an album but I just looked and didn't find.  Will go through my box of pictures to see if it's there, and if it is, will send to Jack so he can put on the website.  I don't remember Mom speaking of Grandma Bell particularly, only just in passing.  I DO remember her telling me that the crock she gave me had belonged to her.  I also have an old diningroom chair that she had told me was my Great Grandmother's.  I think it has been in my bedroom forever, no matter where I lived and is in wonderful shape as it's always been covered with clothes!
 
Lorraine

I remember my Dad speaking of Grandma Bell... nothing specific that I can remember, just hearing her name.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT


Lorraine - I might have the picture here - I will check.  I think Jack is alittle upset with everyone now - he's using all caps.  So let me be the first to follow your instructions, Jack.    Lois

Jack is not upset at all.  (:~)  I'm enjoying the exchange and learning a lot about the family.
U'all keep up the good work.
 
I'm actually VERY  proud of the fact that 'our' generation is laying down a good foundation for the generations to come....!
 
The last I checked there are about 75 printed sheets available to be printed from the running commentary on the web page.
Jack

Hi cousins - I have been going through my photo album of old pictures and a box of odd pictures and have been coming across some really old and interesting pictures and am going to send some to you, Joan, and keep the rest to bring up to the next reunion.  I have NOT found the picture I was thinking of that might Grandmother Bell, but I'm pretty sure that it may be in an album that Lois has, and have asked her to check.  I DID come across a picture of a really old woman in the center surrounded by six young adults/child and another middle aged woman.  My Mother was always very good about writing names on backs of pictures, but this one has no names.  I wonder if the old woman might be Grandma Bell.  This is one of the pictures I'm going to sent to you, Joan.  Give me a day or so to get pictures organized and will then get in mail to you.
 
Tom, I came across several pictures of Orrs that I think may have come from Jo after Aunt Irene passed away, and I did not have an address of any of the Orrs to send to.  If you will send me your mailing address, I'll get these in the mail to you.
 
I came across some pictures of us all at our house on Prospect St. when we were young.  There is one in particular that I'm also going to send to Joan.  She can decide what to give to Jack to put on Web site, but I'm sure this will be one of them.
 
Lorraine

lucretia
Lucretia Whiting Morgan Bell
Jack,
    That is fantastic.  I have never seen this one.  I hope we can identify at least some of the children.  I agree with Alta, that is Aunt Helen on the left.  That should give us some idea by age who some of the others are.  I bet Aunt Olive could help a lot on this on.  She helped me ID many of my old photos which I will be sending you for posting.
    The photo I have and described earlier is of Grandma Addie Graves Marsh, wife of Rufus Marsh and parents of our Grandma Alta Marsh Morgan.
Tom

Tom, as Carol G. mentioned, Uncle Clyde is the baby on G'ma's lap, you spotted Aunt Helen and, I believe, that little blond boy to the far right is Uncle Ray (in white dress).  The others are Aunt Lil Powell's grandchildren, I think.  Whoops, I'm wrong.  The 2 boys in colored clothing are Aunt Lil's sons, Noble and Stuart (of drop dead at the fire fame).  I've always understood that there was some genetic inclination of Powell men to die young.  Noble died quite young, too.  The daughters seemed to do fine.
 Joan

Lorraine and Joan,
    The picture I have and the picture Jack showed us are two different Grandma's.  I believe that Jack's picture is Grandma Lucretia Bell (Orin's wife until he died).  She remarried Seth Bell.  She died in 1925.   The one I have is of Grandma Addie Marsh, wife of Rufus Marsh (parents of Grandma Alta Morgan).  She died in July of 1924.  The grandchildren are clearly the children of Edson and Alta; our parents (elder cousins).
Tommy

Pat,
    Because your a tea-totler!  :)  
I love you anyways,
Tom

Joan, I was wrong again - the picture I had been looking for is the one Jack gave us awhile ago.  I'm not positive but it seems like Mom told me that it is Grandma Bell.  Does anyone know for sure who it is?  Can Aunt Olive help, maybe? 
 
Lorraine

So I have to offer margueritas with lime to be graced with your presence?  Humph!  I thought you loved me for my charming personality and great wit, not to mention the fun tricks I played on you and my poetry writing ability!
Still loving you too!
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

A true Morgan has no trouble talking ! LOL...must be a family trait.....I had 92 emails tonight!  No problem...interesting discussions and pictures.  Thanks to all for sharing.
 
leslie

Thanks Pat for the update. I am probably basically doing something similar as you as I help to take care of my 9 grandchildren and live in with Grace with her 5 children whom all the grandkids are homeschooled so there is no break except when parents take care of them. I also help at our healthy drink and sandwich  cafe 2 mornings a week.

-God Bless---Marge

Joan, Yes, that is right as far as I know.  I think the little boy is Noble Powell.  Not sure about names for the others.  Have a great day.
Carol

Cousins:  I have been confused for a few days over this John A Morgan and Merton H Morgan thing, so I did some homework because maybe others are confused too.  This is what I found:

Orrin E(1821-1867) and Lucretia(1824-1925) had 5 children:

Quartus(1844-1934), Olive(1852-1873), Edmond(1854-1859), Orrin(1861-1862) and John A(1863-1943)

Quartus married Edna(1849-1926)  and  they had 9 children:

William O(1871-    ), Merton H( 1873-    ), Arthur W(1875-    ), Olive E(1877-    ), Lilliam M(1878-    ), Martha P(1880-    ), Edson H(1882-1944)our grandfather,  Frank E(1884-    ), and Jennie(Dolly)(1885-1885).

We need to fill in the death dates for Merton H, Aunt Lil, and Uncle Frank on the geneology page!  Others if we know them.  Also need a birth and death date for our Grandma Alta.

I was very confused with the past emails concerning Merton H, Aunt Lil, who now I see are our grandfather's siblings, and John A, who was our grandfather's uncle.  This is all in the Miles Morgan Descendents page on our website. Hope this helps some of you - it sure helped me!

 
Lois

Pat, It is interesting to catch up on what has been going on in your life.  Perhaps all of us should give a brief bit of info about our families and where we are in our lives now.  Okay Orrs - we know yours will be the longest but we will enjoy every bit of it!
 
A trip out west would be great!  Maybe we could locate a resort that could be rented by a group with all sharing!
Love, Carol

Hi Cuz Jack:
 
    Getting ready to shove off too the mission field in Florida for the winter.   I will suffer down there in the heat while most of my friends will be enjoying the snow flakes here.
 
     Would you please REMOVE my E-mail on your list until I ask to be reactivated, perhaps after I get established there.   I will let you know for sure.
 
     There are just too many e-mails and as I do municiple tower consulting remotely via E-Mail, its too hard to sift through my professional stuff, and I'm afraid I miss some important E-Mail that way.   I will go to the site to read them when I can.
 
     You're doing a great Job Jack., and Thanks.
 
Cuz Roger


Forest Morgan

To

Lloyd C. Yale

John Yale &

Benjamin Glines Jr.

Deed

St. Lawrence County

Clerk’s Office S/B

Recorded in this office on

The 29th day of April

1850 at 8 am in Book

#12 of deeds pages

611 & 612

J.R. Tupper

DepClerk

 

This indenture, made the twentieth fourth day of April in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty between Forest Morgan Jr Cynthia Morgan his wife of Potsdam St. Law County State of New York of the first part and Lloyd C. Yale, John Yale and Benjamin Glines Jr. of the second part, witnesseth, that the said party of the first part, in consideration of the sum of One hundred & fifty dollars, lawful money of the United States of America, paid to them by the said party of the second part, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have granted, bargained, sold, released and confirmed, and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell, release and confirm, to the said party of the second part their heirs and assigns, all that part of mile square lot No 14 lying in the town of Stockholm in the aforesaid county & state beginning in the middle of the highway of the South East corner of Benjamin Streeters farm and running thence south along the middle of said highway nine chains and twenty links, thence south 63 degrees W. 17 chains to a cedar post thence south 27 degrees E. twelve chains and fifty links to a cedar post thence south 63 degrees W. 6 chains and 90 links to a cedar post thence North 28

Degrees W. 11 chains to a cedar post thence S. 63 degrees W 27 chains and 50 links to a cedar post in the line between mile square Lots No 14 and 15 Thence N. 27 degrees W along said mile line 10 chains and 50 links to a cedar post thence N 63 degrees E. 54 chains 74 links to the place of Beginning containing 56 61/100 acres of land be the same more or less as surveyed Dec. 2nd 1848 by Zehiel Stephens.

Sealed and delivered

In presence of

(signed) Arba Robinson

(Signed) Forest Morgan Jr.

 

2007/11/13--As best as possible the above is the wording of a deed of land sold by Forest Morgan: (Note: anything not legible or questionable is underlined). Degrees is underlined because in the deed it looked like a little circle for “degree” and then underlined, with what looked like a “dot” underneath the line? I don’t know how I came by this deed, but at one time I know Aunt Lillian Powell gave me a few historical items while she was still alive, and I was up there fixing her tv. I don’t know where mile square lot 14 lies, but the woodlot is within mile square lot 30. I will also try and do the same for another deed I have of Forest Morgan to Washington Adams, dated May 12, 1849, if people are interested. That is also within mile square lot 14. Also if someone desires a copy of these, I will try and get copies made--however the deeds are front and back on a sheet of paper 15” X 19”, so not sure about getting copies made, and the cost. Chuck


Carol, now you got me humming that darned song.  The alto part was boring and I never was fond of it.  It is great for 4-part harmony though.  If we can get Etta Rae and one of the Matson girls or Alta to join, I will attempt to do "W. H."  Even alto is too high for me anymore though.  You'll all have to prop me up - I may be mouthy, but I'm phobic about groups LOOKING AT ME.  Maybe I could shout my part from behind a tree? 
 
Lorraine, I'd answer you, but a few have already.  Those in the pic were positively identified in the original photo that I saw.  Love
Joan

Joan,
Let's go for it!  Keep it in your head and heart and you will not have to be "propped up"!  We will ask everyone to turn their backs?  You know we can set our own key.  The soprano (lead) is really too high for me anymore.  Not sure if it is age or the fact that I have had to sing alto in the choir for several years now.  We had a couple of good altos that moved away and no one else could read music enough to carry the part so it fell to me.  At any rate I guess the Lord lowered my voice for His reasons.  I do still love to sing but sure don't have the strength I used to have.  Joan, I do remember you had such a nice soft, lovely alto and I enjoyed the good ole days immensely. 
 
For all others - It would be great if we could have another reunion in 2008 and preferably in the summertime (July or very early August) where some of the younger ones could come.  Our two older daughters remember the most from up there but they still have kids in school.  The school in the south start as early as the second week in August
Carol

So where the heck is it?  I didn't notice until I saw "wife, Cynthia" that this was F.M., Jr.  Where is it?  Where is it?  Is Jr. in Everts?  I'm sure I've seen an interview of Joel?
Joan

Joan, I can't believe you can't get in your car and drive out to find those chain links and cedar posts!!!  I bet if I was there we could find them - or say we did!
 
Love,
Lorraine
 
PS  Pictures are in the mail - big bunch to Jack, and a few to Tom and you, Joan.
Lorraine

Ok cousins - without doing all the research my sister did, can anyone tell me who the Throckmortons are and how they are related?  I have heard their names over and over and saw pictures of them as I was going through my album.  I should have sent a picture to Jack, but I don't know who they are.
 
Lorraine

OK..i will locate it for you, plot coming soon on a map.  It is east of Knapps Station, near what used to be SH No. 17, look at the Stockholm atlas map I furnished before, you can see references to Benjamin Streeter on the map. 

Coming soon to a screen near you.  J 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.
President
LaFave White & McGivern LS PC

PO Box 679
Theresa, NY 13691

Lorraine ~
    If I am not mistaken, Dillon Throckmorton is the grandson of Olive (Morgan) and Earnest Drew, son of Ruth Drew and Dillon Throckmorton (Sr.)  Olive Morgan being the sister of Edson and my father Frank.  Hope this helps... and please someone correct me if it is wrong... I am just calling on my feeble memory.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

(This news item was in the Wednesday, May 25, 1949 edition of the Potsdam Herald.)

  

Mr. And Mrs. Robert Haggett

Entertained at a family party on

Thursday evening in honor of the

birthday of Mrs. Haggett’s sister,

Miss Betty Morgan. Guests were

Mr. And Mrs. John Breakey,

Mr. And Mrs. Fred Morgan, Joan,

Charles, Jack and Freddy Morgan.

Mr. And Mrs. Bill Matson,

Mary Lou, Helen, Katherine and

Linda Matson, Mr. And Mrs. Le-

Roy Dunbar, Jean, Marjorie, Rich-

ard, Bruce and David Dunbar,

Mr. And Mrs. Clyde Morgan, Robert,

Wayne, Carol Ann, David,

Dorothy Morgan, Miss Ann Tebo,

Miss Ann Laramy, Mrs. Leslie

Haggett, Harold Haggett, Ruth

And Leslie Haggett.

 

This must have been some party, and even though I was only eleven, its funny I don’t remember it! Does anybody else?

Chuck

Hi, everyone! 

Yeah… must have really been a doozy!  MOM doesn’t even remember it! LOL! 

Love ya all! 

Cheryl N.

Hmmm..based on other attendants and date, I would have been 23 days old, wonder if I was there?

 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.

Pat…

 

Mom said your memory serves you well! 

 

I have to say, I have really been enjoying everyone’s e-mails.  I have no personal memories of much of what everyone is writing, but it’s certainly nice to learn about your family!  I have been reading them to my mother and many of my responses will be from her.  She does have an e-mail address (bjean1927@gmail.com), but seldom checks it. 

Cheryl N.

O.K., cuz, I'll agree to it.  Like Aunt Olive, my range is tenor now.  And promise, everyone will turn their back.  On second thought, re:  "Daddy cut the big one,"  just leave the area, please. 

Joan

Attached find the deed sent out by Chuck plotted on a portion of the Town of Stockholm Tax map as well as a full copy of the Town of Stockholm 1865 atlas on which I have circled in red the general area.  Since this deed is dated 1850, F. Morgan would not have been shown as the owner on the Atlas map, it looks like it may have been a C. Adams. 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.

forest_morgan_lot
It's so darn nice to have a surveyor in the family!!  Great info, Daren!  Thanks.
 
Are there any doctors, lawyers, beggarman, thie----woops, lets leave it at that.
Chuck
Oh, Cheryl ~
    I fully remember your sweet mother from our visit in 1954.  Please tell her "Hello" and give her a big Happy Heart hug for me.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Apparently I wasn't invited, so I don't remember a thing!!  I wonder why we weren't there.  Must be that my parents wanted to get away from us!!
 
Lorraine

Forest Morgan, Jr. and wife Cynthia are buried in the Union Cemetery where Forest Morgan, Sr  and wife Olive are buried.  Just to make sure that everyone is clear, Forest Morgan, Jr. would be a brother of Orin (our great-great grandfather), making  Forest Sr. our great-great-great grandfather.  Orin is also buried in the Union Cemetery (a dirt/grass lane off of Route 56 between Norwood and Potsdam leads up to the cemetery).  Pics of some of the Morgan gravestones in this cemetery are on the Morgan Website.
 
-- Bill

Pat, I got my photo album out again, and I'm looking at a picture of Olive and Ernest Drew, and a picture of Dillon and Ruth Throckmorton.  According to your reply, this would be Dillon, Sr.  Who is Dillon Throckmorton, Jr. married to?  Is Dillon, Sr. still alive?  Is this the Dillon you all have been talking about?  I wish I knew how to scan and email and I could email these to you.  May play around with that and try it out, but no time to do now.
 
Lorraine

Lou and Joe , or someone - Is the Ernest Drew married to Olive the Ernest Drew that owned Drew Ins. Agcy?
 
Lorraine

It might be a nice activity for our next reunion to visit Union Cemetery.  However you will be devastated by the vandalism that has taken place through the years, and the most recent was maybe three years ago, and many Morgan stones were among those  that were either knocked over and sometimes even broken.
 
The stones are thin and set in a "pocket" of concrete, so it doesn't take much of a push to knock them over, and if they are too well seated in the base, they break off instead of tipping over. 
 
I have always thought someone (Morgans?) should pour small horizontal pads, and imbed the stones in this pad, on the ground, in a horizontal position, at the original point where they were placed.  This way the information remains legible, and the stones can no longer be vandalized, unless someone takes up a sledgehammer and goes to a great deal of work--its young kids with nothing to do, so I don't think this would ever happen.  The cemetery is remote to the road, and located in some sand dunes that are perfect for ATV's and such to access, with no one aware of what is going on.
 
There is also a gate across the access road to this cemetery, that a landowner put up, with the local power company supplying the gate (since they have power lines in that area, that also get vandalized), and with the permission of the Town of Potsdam, since they are now the maintainers of this cemetery--it gets mowed a couple times a year by them.  Several years ago, I had conversations with the land owner and the town supervisor regarding my displeasure over this gate, so I was given a key, which didn't really soothe me, but anyway, everyone knows that this is a public access lane to the cemetery, and to someone who wants to visit the cemetery, they have every right to do so.  A great deal of the time, the gate is unlocked and open.
 
Sorry to ramble on, but one of my retirement projects has been to locate and document cemeteries in St. Lawrence County, and while I'm not too active at present, still have the interest.  http://www.stlawrencecountycemeteries.org/  If you want to waste some time--who has time if you read all these emails!!--click on this link.  Chuck

Lorraine,
    Do you mean "Sam Sam the Lavatory Man" that Dad used to sing?  If that's the one, there are enough of us that know that one cold and will do it at the next reunion.  My sister Linda will even do some sound effects I bet...right Linda?
Tom

Lorraine ~
    Dillon Jr is the one we have been talking about.  He is in his seventies now.  Dillon Sr is not alive, nor is Ruth.  Dillon Jr is married to a gal named Irene... don't know her maiden name.  He was married before her to an Alice Thrasher.  I don't have a death date for Dillon Sr or Ruth.  (Her name I see on my records was actually Marion Ruth, but we always knew her by Ruth.)  Dillon Jr. sent me some pictures of himself a while back when he was still able to do email.  I will attach one or two.  Also found one of Aunt Olive Drew and Ruth.  I will check out the website and see if I have any family pics that aren't already there.  I have one of Quartus and a couple of Quartus and Edna... one when they were younger, one older.
 
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

dillon1944dillon1970
olive_drew_ruth_throckmorton

My, my Tom - that "sounds" interesting!  Okay Joan we will all hold you to it.  Now, who is going to make sure a reunion gets planned?  Any volunteers?  Someone did a great job this year, I vote for whoever again!
LOL
Carol

Tom ~
    When you say "cold" do you mean cold sober????  Does that mean we would not have to ply you with margueritas (with lime) to get you to perform?

LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Chuck,
I remember a lot of get-togethers but not this one in particular.  This was the year My brother, Bob graduated from High School.  How many of you remember the barn dances we used to have on the farm?  I remember one when I let go of my partner's hand and ended up tumbling head over heels across the width of the barn!  Would not want to do that now!
LOL,
Carol

Lorraine and Pat,
    You are exactly correct Pat...that mind is not so feeble yet!
I visited Dillon and wife Irene several times in the early 90's first in Brownsville Texas and then in their present home in Clovis CA (east of San Francisco).
    He is the grandson of Olive (Morgan) and Ernest Drew.
Tom

All,
    How in heck did Aunt Olive keep Uncle Bob in check for that party.  I'd have love to be a mouse in the corner for that one.
Tom

All,
Aw heck...if you really want me too.  I am pretty shy but if my big sister Jean and little sister Linda join me, I could try it (after a few toddies of course).
Tommy

Cheryl,
    Great to have you on board and especially your sharing with your Mom.  She must really be enjoying all this nonsense that we have been exchanging.  She is a source of good historical data...we want to be sure to ask Aunt Betty.
    Give her a big hug for all of us.
Love
Tommy

Chuck
How about a "Sound Effects Engineer"   i.e. "Daddy Let the Big One".   OK,  let's not go there again.
Tommy

Lorraine and Pat,
    Just a little to add...Dillon Wesley Throckmorton Sr. was born Mar 20, 1901 and died Sept 29, 1975.  No date of death on wife Ruth.  Dillon Jr. married and divorced Alice Jean Thrasher....they had one child nave Dillon Christian Throckmorton born Jan 10, 1963.  I do not have a maiden name for his present wife, Irene.
    One fact on Dillon Jr. (still living) is that he worked a great portion of his life selling and installing Church organs and was a very, very accomplished organist.  I have a tape of some of his playing.  I also cherish nearly a full ream of letters that Dillon exchanged with me prior to the days of email.  I found him to be an extreme perfectionist, a bit eccentric, very impatient, extremely intelligent and under the cover of that sometimes harsh outward appearance, a very compassionate caring individual.  I enjoyed my nearly 8 years of close exchange and visits with him.  I am ashamed that after he was forced to give up email, I did not continue my relationship via snail mail.  Time to correct that.
Tom

Carol,
    That sounds like Alta who has already agreed and has the "Haggett Farm" available....or we could use the same site as this years, leaving little organization to the leader.  I nominate Alta for the 2008 reunion!  (PS The Orr reunion is scheduled for July 4th 2008 so would hope we could adjust a little do I can sing "Sam Sam" at both of them.)
Tommy

Pat,
Maybe it would be wise for all of the rest of the family to prepare themselves with a few Margarita's (with lime).
Tom

Lois,
    Here is some of the information you asked for from the records I have from Pat's month, Irene Morgan:
 
Merton Hiram Morgan  B. Mar 1, 1873  D. Mar 5 1841 in Billings Montana.  He was married to Besse ?    for four months. He went to deliver a load of hay and found her dead lying across the bed.
 
 Arthur Wilber Morgan B. Jan 31, 1875  D. ?  1930 in Los Angeles, Calif.  Art died after an operation for a ruptured appendix.  He married Edith Mae Toye June 6, 1900.  They had 1 adopted daughter, Edith Eutto.  There were 2 daughters, Lenore and Doris.  Bonnie is the daughter of Lenore.  Doris had two children.
 
    Olive Elizabeth Morgan B. June 24, 1874  D. April 3, 1963 in Rosemead , Calif.  Married Ernest Albert Drew June 29, 1899  B. May 16, 1878  D. June 6, 1958.  They had three children:
Marion Ruth Drew Throckmorton  B. Apr 5, 1901
Married Dillon Wesley Throckmorton SR  B. Mar 20, 1901 
 D. Sept 29, 1975.  (Dillon Throckmorton Jr. is the one we have been talking about)
   enough for now:
Tom

No, I don't remember it either!  Who said we were there?  I vaguely recall Kit Haggett, but don't think I ever attended a party with her. Could this have been one of the barn parties?  I don't think so because I don't think the new barn was built yet.  Alta?  They don't say that any of the Haggett kids were there!
Joan

(11/14/07)
Darren, you are wonderful!  Wonderful!  By the way, (re:  that serious conversation we had yesterday), Forest married his cousin!!!!!!!!!!!!!  There's another ancestor, Timothy, I think (Forest Jr.'s grandfather) who married his cousin - actually, I may be wrong about Timothy.  As I think about it, Albert had Timothy marrying a woman who was 20 years older who then proceeded to have a large family of children - all change of life babies?  Remarkable!  Truthfully now, do you have noticable tics or thumbs (as I and my kids do) that won't bend?  (YOU MIGHT TAKE NOTICE< TOO< OF THOSE OF US WHO CAN"T MANAGE ANYTHING BUT "REPLY ALL" AND HIT SEND)
 
Now will you please tell me, also, what LOL means?  I am guessing that it may have come from video games, to which my grandson is addicted.  Anyone, please?  Love, Joan

Cheryl, welcome, welcome to you and your mother.  How is everyone?  This is time-consuming, but do step in when you can?  Love, Joan

Darren, don't believe a word I said up to this point.  I finally dragged out the family history and it was Daniel, son of Forest Sr. and his wife Olive (Shaw, daughter of Daniel) who probably married his cousin, Cynthia Shaw (daughter of another, we will assume, Daniel Shaw). Actually, this was not uncommon 60 years ago.  Our neighbors on Cottage St., a married couple, were first cousins.  But, I'm struck on reading Albert and other sources by how often the same last names show up (Rust is another).  It sure was a small world.

Cheryl, Boy, they'll just put anything in the paper, won't they?  Was your mother in Watertown by 1949?  Joan

Pat - Thanks for the info.  I'll see about scanning the pictures I have.
 
Lorraine

Hi everyone, I have a bible which was presented to J. Almond Morgan on his 21st birhtday--Feb. 21, 1886 by his Mother Lucretia R. Bell.
  Mom had the bible and gave it to me.  It is very fragile after all of these years. 
There was also a page of marriages as follows:  Orin E. Morgan of Potsdam Junction & Lucretia R. Whiting of Louisville on March 25th, 1848.
Next one is Quartus M. Morgan of Potsdam Junction & Edna E. Butler of Potsdam Junciton on Oct. 5, 1870.
The next one is Seth Bell of Louisville & Lucretia R. Morgan of Potsdam Junciton on March 21, 1872.
The page of births is as follows:  Orin E. Morgan--3/27/1821
                                             Lucretia R. Morgan--12/6/1824
                                             Quartus M. Morgan--3/4/1849
                                              Olive L. Morgan--4/17/1852
                                              Edmond F. Morgan---11/27/1854 
                                              Orin E. Morgan--6/27/1861
                                               John A. Morgan--2/21/1863
The page of deaths is as follows:    Edmond F. Morgan--1/12/1859
                                                Orin E. Morgan, Jr--2/12/1862 
                                                 Olive L. Morgan--3/31/1873
                                                  Lucretia R. Morgan Bell--10/30/1915
                                                  Edna E. Butler Morgan--wife of Q. M. Morgan--4/7/1926
                                                  Quartus M. Morgan--4/21/1934
By my calculations, with the info in the bible was 23 when he was presented with the bible.
Just thought I would share what information I have.   I also have some memories of Grandma & Grandpa 
as we lived on the farm with them when Lou and I were young.  Grandma told me once that I was wasteful
because I didn't eat the stem of my apple. I had eaten the core and the seeds. Guess it didn't hurt me any.
I also remember going into Norwood with Grandpa when he delivered the baked goods to Mc Cormick's store.
I remember standing up on the front seat right next to him.  I also remember a purple sweater and a pair of
rubbers that he bought for me.  How is that for a memory when I must have been 3-4 years old.  We moved 
to Prospect street in 1944.  Everyone seems to have a lot of memories.  If I think of anything more, will send 
it at a later time.    Helen 
 

Hi Tom - Yes, that's the one I mean.  Will look forward to hearing it - especially Linda's part in it.
 Lorraine

Chuck, I would love to go to that old cemetary.  Let's get that on the agenda for our next reunion.
 Lorraine

Carol, I remember the barn dances.  I believe I was too young to dance, but I observed.  However, I don't recall your act there.
 Lorraine

Yes Joan, I guess I must have missed that one.  How could I?  Sorry.
 Lorraine

Joan, are you drinking?  How can I possibly be older than my grandaughter?  I don't even have one!  I think you might be thinking of Marcia Breakey, who is my half-niece, and who is five years older than me.  I don't even have children!!!
 Lorraine

Gosh, Darren, looking at the guest list which includes your parents, I'll bet you were there. Try hard to remember it.  Joan  (I just sent out EIGHT messages - so sorry cousins, I'll try to restrain myself.  Let's see, I'm currently receiving 33 messages so my share is one per day?  Love, Joan

Lorraine, you missed my email the other day re:  Throckmorton.  Olive Drew, daughter of Quartus, was mother to Ruth, Dillon Throckmorton's mother.  Mom corresponded with Dillon for a long time after finding his address in something handed to her upon someone's death - (clear enough)?  You know Mom, Sunday afternoon was for letter writing to anyone who would write back and write back Dillon certainly did!  Love

Very, very funny, Pat. Did you ever hear the joke about the little old lady who went to her Dr. and complained of gas.  Fortunately, she said, it didn't seem to bother anyone else.  Doc treated her ears and sinuses and she discovered to her embarrassment that those around her were much more aware of her gas than she had believed.  That's me - thank heaven for limited hearing and stuffy sinuses.  I'd never be able to face my public otherwise.

Pat, you may not know that Cheryl Nolette is the youngest of the 46 first cousins.  We are spread out over about 36 years - and what's really amazing is that Darren, I believe, is the first great-grandchild of Edson's and Alta's and he said recently that he is 58 years.  Cheryl's baby, Chloe, is the youngest great-grandchild and she is 7 mos. (??  time is going too fast, Chloe is just beautiful).  Amazing span.  Joan

Hi Helen - It's nice hearing from you, and so great to see you once again at the reunion, after so many years.
 Lorraine

Thanks, Darren - very kind and thoughtful of you.  Joan

In May 1949 I was still "baking" and would have been done on August 31st 1949  .. Ruth was born in 1946 and Les was born in 1947 so both would have been at the party if it was held at the farm ... I certainly don't remember it ....  .... alta

I always wished we could "map" this cemetery - a grid map - because many stones are sinking right into the sand and Lord knows who has slipped out, too.  It is almost too late now - when i first went up old Forest and Olive's site were marked.  I haven't been up since a bad vandalism almost 10 years ago and Forest's stone was broken and lying on the ground, along with many others.  Maybe a wrought (sp?) iron fence with broken glass on the top?  I also saw very large tire marks which I believed to mean that the town was using a tractor to mow (gross studpidity).  I like Chuck's idea of embedding horizontally what stones are left in concrete, but I'd also be content with a grid map that one can use and walk to the approximate spot where family was buried - find it, that is, even though the stones are gone.  Isn't it amazing that we have a surveyor in the family, too (though even I can do a plan on a grid after hours of pacing, measuring and triple checking, placing, erasing, etc.).

Maybe this is the song for which wmindc should write 4 parts and offer WC auditions.  Is Linda competitive?  Can we thwart Cheryl Doyle's intent to use a FM?  Joan

Joan, you are confusing me with the initials/abbreviations!  Carol

Ah yes, Sam, Sam the Lavatory Man.  Well, for all that heard my dad, Walt, sing it and make that ukelele dance, you’ll know that any of us trying to duplicate would be a try.  But Tom, I think you would be the expert at the sound effects.  Better let me do lyrics – Agree Jean?

Linda

And by the way, if the marguerites are flowing, pour me one.  This promises to be a very interesting reunion! 

Linda

 

Joan ~
    Since no one else responded I will...
    Not from video games... one of many acronyms used particularly in instant messaging. 
    LOL = Laughing Out Loud
    ROTFL = Rolling On The Floor Laughing
There are many, many others.  A couple of people I exchange emails with think it means Lots Of Love and frequently end their messages with it, which makes me LOL.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Helen, thanks a whole bunch!  I do not recall that you lived on the farm.  I must have been very little.  Boy, Grandma was a stickler, wasn't she.  I never saw that.  She was pretty patient and I suspect, probably had a bad hip.  I hope you are doing well?  Love, Joan

Helen ~
    Thank you for all that good information and for sharing your memories.
    Do you all realize how fortunate you are to have known your grandparents at all?  My mother was 23 years younger than my father.  He was 59 when I was born and both of his parents were deceased.  My mother was 38.  Her mother was deceased.  Her father was alive and was a wonderful man, but, alas, he died when I was not yet 3 years old. 
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Tom ~
    Thank you.  I did not have Dillon and Alice's son on my records.  He must have been older when their son was born as that was the same year that my Linda (Windy to you, Tom) was born.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Tom ~
And what defense does a tea totler like myself have???
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Joan ~
    I didn't know that.  Thanks for filling me in.
Cheryl ~
    Now you HAVE to send me a pic of Chloe... as you may have guessed from my profession (nanny), I love babies.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

(11/15/07)
To all:

Perhaps it should or could be investigated with the Town of Potsdam as to whether private individuals could go in and try and imbed the stones in, clean up the cemetery etc, put up a ten foot high fence with concertina wire across the top, etc. As far as mapping out the cemetery, that should not be too much of a problem,

I might know a few individuals who might help out with that on a Saturday work day.
Daren

Grandma was just kidding when she told me I was wasteful..I also remember her giving me a little piece
of yeat cake to eat when she was making bread.  We moved up there so Dad could help out on the farm
when Grandpa was sick.  (At least that is what I was told)    Helen

Marjorie - Thank you so much!  Great slide shows, and alot of pictures I have not seen before.  My mother always used to talk about what fun "the sisters" had when they were young with the McGee sisters.  She used to rattle off their nicknames to me, but I sure don't know them now!  Can anyone remember?  I know someone was Hortence(sp?),   Lois

Lorraine, age decidedly hasn't improved my mind.  I thought something didn't seem right about that but was hurrying.  Right, now that I think of it, Marcia would be a niece.  How is Marcia, anyway?  Joan

Carol, Linda, too.  I forgot about the newbies.  Back a ways, Tom sent a low-type song "Daddy cut the big one (in church last Sunday)."  Bill Matson (wmindc) came out of the sandbox long enough to offer to write a 4-part score for choir.  There would be whoopie cushion (WC) auditions and Bill was very strict about guidelines for the audition.  Chuck's daughter, Cheryl, challenged Bill and insisted that she should be able to bring her fart machine (FM), her reasoning being that the lower on the tree, the more difficulty w/o some kind of assistance.  We kindergartners had a blast (whoops!  We had a good time).  Joan

What seems strange to me is why Orin and his wife have a very nice stone at Union Cemetery, but there is no mention of his son (5 or 6 yrs old) being buried there also, and died just one day before Orin?
 
Who has an answer to this?
Chuck

Joan and all,

Perhaps a work detail in the Spring can do a lot to improve on the cemetery.  Would give the winter for someone to organize and plan.  I will be there. 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.

Pat, her is one who thought the LOL means lots of love and that is how I use it!
 
LOL, Carol

Hi all - would love to work on the cemetary with whoever, but not enough to make a special trip North for it.  Probably would be too late in the season if scheduled around the reunion, wouldn't it?
 
Lorraine

Joan,
Thanks for catching me up.  I have a son-in-law who would win this competition hands-down!

perhaps since their deaths were only one day apart, they were placed together in the same casket with the intent that at a later date, a marker would be placed and it just never got done ... alta

Darren, Chuck and the Town of Potsdam Historian (??????, Chuck - I have no idea who it is anymore) might be a lot of help.  I will stop by and ask the county historian who might be of help, too.  This has weighed on a lot of us for years.  Can we Really, Really do something with it?  Love, Joan

joan ... I don't know the legal end of things, but I believe we have an obligation to go in there and do what we can .. Roger took me there last summer and I was appalled at the condition ... so sad!!!    alta

This is changing the subject somewhat, and I may be the last to know, but I just came across a website - New York State Morgan Horse Society http://nysmhs.org/  Very interesting!
 
Lorraine

To All: 
I think we should do something before all is lost.  Actually, it should not take that many people, as a matter of fact, too many people and we will be stumbling over ourselves.  I am a little to far removed to organize this, but definitely offer my time to work on it.
 
Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.

Lorraine, 

Have you checked out the paper on the Justin Morgan horse on the Edson Morgan web site? 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.

would very much like to be a part of this.  If there is something we could do, we should do it.  This cemetery also has a bit of history to it, other than being the resting place of some of our ancestors.  Chuck, are you aware of any written history on this cemetery?  I think it was connected to an experimental community in the Unionville area.  Seriously.  

If there is work we’d be allowed to do to restore and secure the cemetery, we’re going to need money.  I’m ready to write a check.  Is there anyone interested in setting up an account and being our treasurer?  If we were set up as a family foundation/non-profit, we could make tax deductible contributions.  Is there a lawyer among us?  Anyone have any ideas?  

-- Bill

Excuse my ignorance, but is this a different cemetary than the one in Norwood where our parents are buried, or the same one.

-God Bless---Marge

Hortence, I think might have been her really name. I have a picture with the name Hortence on it. My mother was Sari Jane

-God Bless---Marge

That's okay, Carol... I like the LOTS OF LOVE interpretation!
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Margie ~
    Thank you for all the wonderful photos.  I love the one of my father (Uncle Frank) with Aunt Lil.  I have never seen that one.  I am thinking it was probably taken in 1954 when we visited because that is how I remember Aunt Lil looking.  I wonder if it was in her house?
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Alta, Darren, all, I wonder, too, if part of the vandalism problem from the kids in Unionville is that the cemetery seems abandoned.  I know that doesn't deter kids in other locations though.  Anyway, we can't do anything at all w/o the town's approval and we need the blessing of the historical soc., too, but to leave it as is w/o trying would be a shame.  Come all board - maybe you can coordinate a time with when you would be home, though I know your time with your parents is precious - even cheerleading is a big help!  We could at least get the grid done this year and while there, decide what is possible for the following year?  Joan

Yeah, Bill, Franklin Hough and, probably Evert, describe the nature of the communal society.  Forest Morgan was not one of the Union, as I understand it, but he seemed to know them and he bought his land from them.  (I've suspected - I'm really reaching w/o proof here - that Ami Currier and John Burroughs may have been distantly related because they both have "Rusts" in their genealogy.  Remember that Miles's first daughter, after her husband was killed by the Indians, married a Rust).The Union Cemetery is our concern..  Go for whatever you think we should do re:  a fund, Bill.  Anything is better than nothing.

Joan/Chuck, All

 

On the St Lawrence County Cemetery site, they list an inventory of the headstones at the Union Cemetery.  I wonder if when the inventory was taken, if they actually mapped out the site, this would be handy in reestablishing some of the head stones.  In any event, it will be a major project, will take planning, and will definitely not be a weekend project. With that said, anything that we do, will be an improvement.

 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S

I forgot to mention that Currier and Burroughs were members of the Union.  I wonder if we might be able to get funds from the National Trust or a NY Trust.  It is quite a lengthy process to get the site named by them and then there are very, very specific guidelines as to what we could do there.  Let's start and do the grid in the meantime?  Love, Joan

I think that Chuck is the best one to guide us on this, with his interest in cemeteries and such.  It is great that there is so much enthusiasm  concerning this matter, but when it comes down to the end, there are very few of us that are actually within an hour’s drive that could spend time on this project.  I would suggest appointing Chuck to plan and organize whatever he feels is the best approach.  We are all interested because of the Morgan’s buried there, however, I am sure that there are other families who, if made aware, would be just as concerned.

 

What about it Chuck?  From a realistic point of view, what would you suggest?

 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S

My two cents--Susan Lyman, historian did do a map of sorts that I think is fairly accurate to how the stones originally were.  (I'm leaving one at the nh for you, Joan).  The town inherited the cemetery, as all towns do, when there is no longer burials/funds to care for the cemetery.  We have every right to go up there and attend to our relatives graves, but by letting the town know what we intend, we would get their blessing besides.  (The present Town Supervisor, Marie Regan lives less than a mile from the cemetery)  (Marg--this is not the Riverside Cem, but a 125 grave cemetery, located on the Potsdam-Norwood road).  If everyone agrees that it would be best to leave the stones on the ground, imbedded in concrete, we are not talking a major project at all--there are about 25 Morgan stones.  I would think the first step is to go up and place the stones face up in the approximate place that they belong (an easy task that I could do alone).  Next measure what we would need for 2X6's to build frames.  Someone with more ability than I have would need to estimate how many bags of cement and how much water we will need.  (I doubt if a mixer truck would drive up there, but it might be possible).  We would need a generator to turn a mixer, if that is what we are going to do, and enough water to mix. (I have a generator).  It would be nice to have all the frames built and in place so that we could pour as many as possible in a day, without having to wait for concrete to dry, and then move the frames.  The actual day of pouring is when help would be needed to mix, wheel, and place the stones into the concrete.  (Broken stones, leave them broken, but pieced together as best we can, before letting the concrete dry).  Bill, you took some great pictures way back, and you would a great one to check on details, as we are placing the stones back in their original location).  Someone in the Matson family, should try and convince Len Donnelly to supervise this project--he would be a natural, and it would keep him off the streets for a few days!  I think we would all be surprised at how little money it would take, and really not that much labor, if we could set aside a couple days, with several volunteers.  Other suggestions?
Chuck

Chuck, sounds like a start of a plan, I knew you would come through.

 

April  would be great if we have the weather, that way no worry about black flies, and not much chance of heat stroke, good working weather  (Besides, after May 1 when Walleye season opens, my boat starts calling me  J …and then there is bass season….and then the walleye start hitting again..) Of course Dad could always hold my boat as hostage since it is stored for the winter at his place, until the project was done.

 

Daren L. Morgan, 

Hi Daren - Yes, awhile ago I checked, but not recently.  Will look at again.  Incidently, I LOVE Justin's music!
 
Lorraine

I think all of our parents would be so proud of you all.
 
Lorraine

Darren, Some or us have copies of the cemetery census taken by the deceased (now) historian.  I've got to check to see for sure, but I don't think she used site numbers.  When I mentioned a grid map, I was hoping for something to scale so that if the stone is gone or misplaced, we might still have a pretty good idea of just where the body is buried.  I'll get out my copy of the Union Cemetery census tonight.  Joan

Chuck, sounds fantastic.  What does anyone think or know re:  trying to place it as a state historic site.  It is time-consuming, but maybe we could even get a little iron fence out of it.  I don't care so long as something is done, but if we do things ourselves and then find that historically speaking, it is not acceptable, will we regret it?  Don't mean to throw a monkey wrench in any plan, I just want to see SOMETHING done.  Joan

I didn't know that our Navy pilot had a humiliatory bone in his body!  Love you, Tom.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Humilitory?   Heck, I was just a Navy pilot...don't use such big words on me.  I assume it must mean that I am handsome, intelligent and mild mannered.  It might also mean that I am full of _____________.  You can fill in the blank.
One good looking cousin!  (Bet Chuck won't leave this one alone.)

Hi Linda Reuther.  Glad you're on the list.  Wish I had the time to say or share something useful.  But I'm on the run.  Only got time to stick my tongue out:  :>P    (Joan and Pat, another email shorthand for your list.)
 
hugs,
Billy

Bad news, Tom.  I believe (because I forwarded them to him) that Jack is adding the song, Bill's replies and Cheryl's challenge to audition restrictions to the web page.  Should you remain anonymous?  Love, Joan

Hey,here's a thought. How about next year we just piggy-back on the Orr's reunion since they have it all planned out, ha. Then we don't have to plan it or decide where it w8ill be held. Let them be the sponsor and that way we meet all the Orr family again .

-God Bless---Marge

Daren (and all),
 
In one of your emails this past week you wondered out loud if the intertwinings of the Morgan/Matson familes might have any genetic implications.  In all seriousness I don't think the way our families are related could possibily have any genetic implications.  I mean my sisters and I have  three toes on our right foot and seven on our left; but that's the way it is for everyone, right?  That's what our folks always told us.  :>)
 
By the way, are folks aware that there is another Morgan/Matson connection - sort of?  Wilbur Matson (brother of Almon D. and Ruby Z.) married Zilpha who was half-sister to Marion, who married Ray Morgan.  (Our) Uncle Wilbur and Aunt Zilpha Matson were also Uncle Wilbur and Aunt Zilpha to Etta Rae, Rodger, Jim and Claude Morgan.
 
-- Bill

Lois and all.
    I had a picture of my Mom's that had me in a little white dress when I was about 1 yr old.  Now I don't know when that practice started buy I am sure glad Mom quit doing it when she did.
    Matter of interest...we have a colony of Amish in our area. All of their children regardless of sex wear dresses until they are potty trained.  They told me it was easier to change their diapers.  Maybe the same reason held before we got so conscious of such things.
Tom

Lorraine and all,
                 They hadn,t invented trousers yet. and then---"The first day i wore my knicker brocs(?), i felt so funny after wearing frocks. I looked a little picture they did say, but when they turned me out to run and play. Oh, i didn,t like the pants that i was wearing, so in the street i took them off you see. I started walking home so brave and dareing, in that little shirt that Mother made for me"
 
                  Does that answer your ?---Wayne       ps ,--i wore knickers, and so did Chuck, Jack,and my brother Bob--as you can see in some of the old pictures

We have a poet in the family!    I think Tom's reply about the Amsh community makes alot of sense, but it just looks strange in a studio portrait to see a little boy in a frilly dress, so you can't even tell what sex he is.  I thought maybe it was done because "the boys were so pretty "that the Moms wanted to dress them up as girls.  What do so think, guys?  Lois

All,
    Amazing what you find when you start digging through old pictures etc.  I found an envelope addressed in very neat scrip handwriting as follows:
                Mr.& Mrs. Q.M. Morgan
                #72 No. Main St.
                Norwood, N. Y.
Inside the envelope was a very nice card imprinted with:
  "Congratulations on your Golden Anniversary"
 
    The same is it was not signed by anyone and there was no return address on the envelope nor was it stamped as mailed.
I should bring it with me to the next reunion along with Grandpa Edson's diary.
Tom

Jack and all,
I just checked and I had no trouble to get into the photos of the albums on another computer. Then instead of playing the slide show, click on the picture that you would like and it will enlarge. Then go to file and click Save as and when it comes up This photo is owned by Walmart, just erase that and name the photo, ex. Grandpa and Grandma Morgan, then click to save to your computer and it will be saved in your documents. So Jack, should be able to copy any of these photos to the website by coping to your computer and then transferring it to the website you created. Also, any of the rest of you should be able to save any photos you would like to your computer too. When you enlarge the photo, the distortion of the photo should also go away.

-God Bless---Marge

Good Morning Cousins!
 
I remembered something this morning that I haven't thought of in years, and I bet a lot of you never knew.  I think I was in my 20's when Uncle Fred mentioned that my Mother had played the piano for the silent movies in the theater in Norfolk.  I remembered being shocked that my Mother was that old.  I don't remember her being too thrilled when I asked her about it; it was like she was embarrassed about it.
 
Lorraine

Cousins - I don't remember any of those songs, but, Lorraine, I remembered, a few days ago,  about Mom playing piano for the silent movies  , but I thought it was at the Norwood theater.  She never wanted to talk about it.    Lois

PS - if someone sings those songs at our next reunion, maybe it will spark some memories...

Doesn't anybody remember "The Old Gray Mare"?
 
The old gray mare, she (rude noise) on the whipple tree,
(rude noise) on the whipple tree,
(rude noise) on the whipple tree.
The old gray mare she (rude noise) on the whipple tree,
Many long years ago.
 
Chorus:
 
Many long years ago,
many long years ago,
 
(repeat verse)
 
This might be another four-part challenge for Bill to arrange for the next reunion.
 
Chuck

Maybe at some point we should collect a favorite receipe from as many Morgan's as possible, and organize a cookbook?  Besides the receipe, and name, the family tie, and present location should be included.  Could include some of Gramma Morgan's baking receipes.  It could be an on line cookbook, or print it out.
 
Just an idea.
 
Chuck

Oh PLAYMATE, come out and play with me
And bring your dollies three.
Climb up my apple tree,
Look down my rain barrel
Slide down my cellar door
And we'll be jolly friends forever more.

It was a rainy day, She couldn't come out to play,
With tearful eyes and tender sighs
I could hear her say:

I'm sorry Playmate, I cannot play with you
My dollies have the flu,
Boo-hoo hoo hoo hoo hoo.
Can't climb your rain barrel, [or: Ain't got no rain barrel]
Can't slide your cellar door [or: Ain't got no cellar door]
But we'll be jolly friends forever more.
 
  Rog

Chuck,
Great idea...the Orr family put one together about 10 years ago with loads of recipes (some passed down from Grandma Alta's...sugar cookies, molasses cookies, donuts).  We have the family genealogy in the second section of it.  We have a big advantage in that we already have the genealogy part on record (the Orr's had to collect it all first...Barb and I spent 7 months on the road in the RV one year visiting family members...many we didn't even know were family).
    Our's is in book form and on CD.  We could do this real easy with everyone's input and so much easier with so many of us on-line.
     Maybe we could use the Matson and  Orr family cook books as an example and put together a Morgan Family Cookbook and genealogy record in one package.
Tom

I really like this idea, Chuck!  I always thought we should have brought the recipe to the dish we brought to family reunions.  Mom has quite  a few of Grandma Morgan's recipes.  I'm sure Aunt Olive has a few, too!  If you wanted a book printed, I would love to design one!  I have plenty of time on my hands at the moment... well, when the kiddies are sleeping, anyway!
 
Love to all!
 
Cheryl

Searched it at Google and found two versions:
 
Oh Playmate, Come Out and Play With Me
(Version 1)

Written By: Unknown
Copyright Unknown

Say, say, oh playmate,
Come out and play with me
And bring your dollies three
Climb up my apple tree

Shout down my rain barrel
Slide down my cellar door
And we'll be jolly friends
Forever more more more more more

Say, say, oh playmate
I cannot play with you
My dolly's got the flu
Boo hoo hoo hoo hoo hoo

Ain't got no rain barrel
Ain't got no cellar door
But we'll be jolly friends
Forever more more more more more

-------------------------------------------------------

Oh Playmate, Come Out and Play With Me
(Version 2)

Written By: Unknown
Copyright Unknown

Say, say, oh playmate,
Come out and play with me
And bring your dollies three
Climb up my apple tree

Slide down my rainbow
Into my cellar door
And we'll be jolly friends
Forever more, 1-2-3-4

It was a rainy day,
She couldn't come out and play
With tearful eyes, she breathed a sigh
And I could hear her say:

Say, say, oh playmate
I cannot play with you
My dolly's got the flu
Boo hoo hoo hoo hoo hoo

Ain't got no rainbow
Ain't got no cellar door
But we'll be jolly friends
Forever more, 1-2-3-4 

Oh Cheryl,
    Thank you so much for volunteering to do the design work on a cookbook.  Now we just need to agree we will do this project....how about it all?   Then someone willing to be the focal point for collecting the recipes and putting it into some sort of data form for Cheryl to convert to a designed and printed book. 
    I am willing to send a copy of the Orr Family cookbook/genealogy to Cheryl or others to provide an idea to work from.  I am sure we can also use the Matson cookbook as a pattern.
    Who is willing to help Cheryl with the project?  Need someone with the genealogy source (Jack or Chuck?) to provide in a form suitable for publishing with the cookbook.
    How about it folks...should we go ahead with Chuck's suggestion before we are too old to remember if "we added the sugar or not"?  Perhaps there are others like me that are already at that point.
    When we did our collection for the Orr book, we set up a standard format for the recipes so it was easy to follow throughout the book.  But I'm getting ahead of the game.
Love you crazy cousins,
Tommy
PS.. Bill, if I'm still Tommy then I think you should let us all remember you as Billy...what say Maestro?  We could call you Dr. Billy or Rev. Billy if that would suit you better.

Just a thought... this might be a project worth sending to the Morgan museum in Vermont.  Don't know how many of you have been there, but we go every year and they are always looking for genealogy information and just about anything Morgan they can get there hands on.  Perhaps it could be sold there with the profits used as our donation to keeping the museum going.  Just a thought.
 
Love ya, cousins!
 
Cheryl

Hi, again, everyone!
 
The museum is actually called "The National Museum of the Morgan Horse."  There are pictures of Justin Morgan and information about his portion of the Morgan family.  The last time we visited, however, the curator was very interested in obtaining Morgan facts about the rest of the family.  They do have a website. The address is
www.morganmuseum.org.  You are able to take a virtual tour at the website. 
 
Later!
 
Love ya,  Cheryl

Cheryl and all,
    I have a number of the Orr family that is not in on this exchange but would like to be part of the recipe program.  I suggest this so we can keep the cost for postage down.
    Each of us family unit "heads" could forward the request for recipes to our family members either by mail, in person or email.  We would provide them with the format for the recipe and have them submit them to you (or whoever is going to coordinate this) directly by email or snail mail.
    I would hesitate to add everyone in all the family units to our exchange loop here as they would get very large and cause some servers to reject them.  As an example, I would guess that there are at least 50-75 Orr's with email and only 5 of us are in this present loop.  You can see how many we would end up with if we all added all our family members.
    By using the "head" of each family unit to coordinate for their group, we would keep mailing costs down and keep the email exchange reasonable in size.
    Any comments by anyone on this thought?
Tom
PS  Chuck, your right!  You were in charge of "rude noises" in those songs.  My mind has slipped but my nose is still very much alive.

I think this is a wonderful idea, Tom.  Recipes can start coming at any time as far as I'm concerned.  You are more than welcome to send them to me if you want.  My snail mail address is  60 State St., Malone, NY  12953.  If you send a recipe via e-mail... it would be easiest to have them sent as a Word attachment.  Pictures would be great, too!
 
Later and love to all!
 
Cheryl

O.K.... Since my wonderful cousins are (ahem)  SOOOO much older than I am, I have no memory of those things of which you speak.  I feel the need, however, to contribute in some small manner, so here goes:
 
I have memories of trips to Norwood from Cleveland.  Marilee, Karen, Alan, and I would entertain ourselves by singing the song "Dead Skunk in the Middle of the Road" every time we saw (or smelled) a skunk.  Lame... but it kept us entertained!  We were just displaying our musical talent!
 
I recall spending the night at the farm with Mark and MaryAnn.  One night we decided to sleep in the hay loft.  We awoke at one point to hear someone snoring in the barn.  We were terrified and convinced ourselves that a madman was waiting to attack us.  Finally unable to hold our bladders, we made our way down the stairs only to discover that our madman was Tippy the beagle.
 
Lastly... I remember spending our time at "camp."  Aunt Rena and Uncle Fred were not yet permanent residents of their home on the river, so that was where we stayed.  Uncle Fred, of course, made it a point to be there to take us on boat rides and to push us on the swing he built (Man, I loved that thing!)  Does anyone remember that huge rock in the river near Aunt Ethel and Uncle Bill's?  We had contests to see who could find it first.  That usually happened in the form of stubbing a toe.  We spent the rest of the day jumping off of the thing.  I also recall Mark Haggett finding a HUGE bullfrog near the dock.  Mark picked it up and threw it at me.  I caught it and threw it back.  This continued for a few more tosses until one of us missed and it hit the dock.  The frog, of course, didn't move... and something disgusting spewed from its mouth.  After about three minutes, the frog started to move, swallowed whatever it spit up, and hopped off.  It was the last game of frog catch we ever played.
 
Later, all!
 
Love ya,
 
Cheryl

Hi all my distant cousins,
I got onto my computer a few days ago and couldnlt imagine what in the world had happened. I had over 400 emails but as I was about to delete them thinking I'd been invaded by whoever snuck in (is that a word - snuck?}, I recognized some of the names and decided to read on. That's when I discovered all of you and what a wonderful discovery. I've been trying to catch up on all of it and piece together who everyone was in relation to me and now I'm ready to join the bandwagon and reacquaint myself to all my kin folks. I'm Shirley Orr Etheridge and I fit somewhere there inbetween that crazy person you all know as 'Tom' and my baby sister 'Linda.' I am the 5th child in the family of your Uncle Walt (wasn't he wonderful} and Aunt Mildred [Best pies in the world] Orr. I have very fond memories of summers in Norwood at the farm with all the Haggets and on Prospect Street with the Breakeys and Matsons. Can't wait to get to know you all again. Shirley

Look who have the best memories, the oldest cousins. As we lose our short-term memory we remember our childhood memories. We better try to get as much info from Aunt Olive and Aunt Betty until we don't have them and their memories. As you are mentioning things, I am thinking that I am sure my mother would have known many of the answers. Boy, I had wished that I had taped everything she was telling about her childhood to Dennis, Susan's husband. Maybe someone needs to get Aunt Olive on tape or video singing "The Little Grey Rabbit". Cheryl, what is Aunt Betty's email adress again?

-God Bless---Marge

welcome Shirley .. all this exchange has been awesome ... and it all started with your cousin Chuck accusing your brother Tom with "cutting the cheese" .. well, sort of!!! .. lol .. anyway, it's been wonderful to get to know each other again and to write down our memories of years past ... we have such a richness don't we? ... I have wonderful memories of Middle Road in Henrietta and on your farm riding the big palamino ... oh how I miss Uncle Walt!!!  the fish fry's in Avon, the ice cream at Mizensals (sp) and of course, and the rendition of Sam Sam .... I LOVED the summers in Rochester ... fill us in on what you are doing and join us with your memories ... love having you aboard .. your cousin in Seattle ... alta

Hi Shirley!  I have very fond memories of you also!  Remember the rooster Elaine was suppose to kill, except I think it was Harley who ended up doing it, and you cooked, and it was so tough!!  I think I was only 15 that summer, and had such a wonderful time visiting my Henrietta Cousins!
 
Lorraine Breakey Mayo, a cousin

All –

LOVE the cookbook idea.  It would be a joy to work on and invaluable to own, just as our Orr cookbook is.
Billy will always be Billy to me.  Tommy will always be Tommy.  I don’t believe it diminishes anyone in any way – they are endearments, Morgan style.

 Linda (Orr) Reuther 

This is what I remember about 200 Middle Rd, Henrietta--
 
I'm sure Aunt Mildred was a good cook but I can't remember--this big dump truck would come and dump outdated baked goods in the pig pasture, and before the pigs could get there, we boys would be out there picking out the pies and cupcakes and all that stuff that was wrapped, and would take it to Tom's room--it would be lined up everywhere in his room after a delivery.  (I've always wondered if the pigs had been trained to unwrap that stuff, or did they eat paper and all?).  And Tom had an after school job, and in the evening he would come home with onion rings or French Fries when he got off work from this fast food place, and we would pig out on that stuff.  And then we would go down cellar, and decide how many flavors to mix together, to make some "exotic" ice cream--it was home-made and it sure was good!  So when the dinner bell rang, I don't think I was ever too hungry.
 
And we drove "jitney" all over the farm, at a speed too fast, flinging mud everywhere.  And the time we dumped gasoline in the brook down behind the barn, and waited a while for the gas to float down stream, and then lit it.  I bet we had a half-mile of brook burning.  I remember a small plane circling overhead, wondering what was going on probably.  And the time we went a short ways, to jump off a bridge into the canal (it was after dark). Harley was with us that night.  When we got home and Uncle Walt asked where we had been, and said, "well, did you ever think that there might be a log floating on the water", and that ended that foolishness.
 
There's more, but I'll spare you.   Chuck
 

Hi Sis,

It’s unbelievable, isn’t it? After work everyday, it takes me most of the evening to catch up on the emails, or try to put together the puzzle pieces.  Feel like I’m getting to know everyone that I only had ‘names’ for.
Love you!

Linda

Alta & all –

 

Alta asked about a song, other than Sam Sam The Lavatory Man, that my dad used to sing.  Well Walter Orr was a man of many songs, many of them made up on the spur of the moment I now realize, but I think the song you remember Alta that we had so much fun with that summer, and many, many summers, reunions, Christmas parties, and jam sessions, was Minnie the Mermaid (which actually IS a song!).  Do you remember it going something like….

 

            Oh what a night I had with Minnie the Mermaid

            Down at the bottom of the sea.

            Down among the coral,

            I forgot my ‘troubles’

            Gee but she was awfully good to me.

 

                        …etc…

(Dad changed some of the words to Protect The Innocent…or made some up to keep us giggling – not sure which!)

 

That was one of his famous songs & to this day, even my children remember it.  (I copied the chorus off the internet below)  There is even a children’s book that was published as a result of that song.  It’s one of my favorite ukelele moments of dad’s J

 

Linda (Orr) Reuther

 

 

 

Chorus:

Oh what a time I had with Min -nie the Mer -maid,

Down at the bot -tom of the sea;

I for -got my trou -bles, There a -mong the bub -bles,

Gee but she was aw -fly good to me.

And ev' -ry night when the star fish came out,

I'd hug and kiss her so.

Oh what a time I had with Min -nie the mer -maid,

Down in her sea -weed bun -ga -low

I just mentioned Harley in my last email.  For those of you who never saw it, or maybe even never knew Harley (Tom's brother), I think you will be interested in this --
 

Webster Builder Harley E. Orr Dies

(June 27, 1935-April 13, 2001)

Harley E. Orr spent 47 years at Pike Construction Co., building everything from hotels to museum additions.

He also spent some time working on his house in Webster, expanding it to more than 4,000 square feet for one reason: children.

Mr. Orr and his wife of 47 years, Ina, had five children. They adopted four others, including two infants from Vietnam in the mid-1970's.

They also invited numerous foster children in Monroe County to stay with them. And they even welcomed a refugee family living in squalor to stay with them for more than a year. That family included a small child.

"The more kids that came, the more he built," said his son, Ted.

Mr. Orr--builder of structures, of families, of lives--died April 13, of prostate cancer. He was 65.

Mr. Orr was born on June 27, 1935, and spent his youth in Henrietta. He graduated from Rush-Henrietta High School and had an interest in all kinds of activities, from sports to music.

"With whatever he did, he was always in the center of activity," said his brother, Tom.

It was at a high school singing competition that Mr. Orr met Ina. The relationship blossomed while they worked together at the Hickok Belt Co. in Rochester. They married in 1953 and soon moved to their Webster home.

Meanwhile, Mr. Orr went into the building trade as a carpenter's apprentice. He joined Pike early on, eventually becoming a vice president. Steve Shuckra, president at Pike, said Mr. Orr had a solid reputation for being thorough and honest.

"He was a man of honor," said Shuckra, who worked with Mr. Orr for more than 17 years.

Shuckra said Mr. Orr oversaw construction projects at the Lodge at Woodcliff and at the George Eastman House.

 

 

(Harley E. Orr, page two)

But family and friends point to the work Mr. Orr did to build the Ronald McDonald House on Westmoreland Drive in Rochester. The facility, which opened in 1990, is a home away from home for children dealing with life-threatening medical problems and for their families.

The project was the perfect marriage of Mr. Orr's vocation and his love of children, said Bonnie Vahey, executive director of the Ronald McDonald House.

"He was delightful," Vahey said. "His personality jelled with the volunteers who worked at the house."

Friends and family say he was a giant of a man with unruly gray hair and a hearty laugh. He was fun-loving and warm. He played guitar and sang with zest.

"While he had a lot of responsibility, he had a lot of child in him," said Jack Heister, a good friend.

And while Mr. Orr never lost the child inside, he often reached out to help children in the community.

"My father always made room for one more," said his oldest daughter, Melanie Steenhoff.

In addition to his wife, Mr. Orr is survived by his mother, Mildred Orr of
Rochester; two brothers--Don of Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Tom of Long Prairie, Minn.; five sisters--Jean Sparks of Conesus, Livingston County, Roberta Maxwell of South Carolina, Shirley Etheridge of Lynchburg, Va., Elaine Jacobs of Dansville, Livingston County, and Linda Reuther of Livonia, Livingston County; and nine children--Melanie Steenhoff of Webster, Michelle Spencer of Mansfield, Pa., Ted Orr of Webster, W. Tony Orr of Atlanta, Jason Orr of Webster, Tirzah Orr of Washington, D.C., Emily Kelly of Syracuse, Robert Key of Sodus, Wayne County, and Pauli Orr of Irondequoit.

Memorials may be directed to Ronald McDonald House, 333 Westmoreland Drive, Rochester, NY 14620. (Michael Caputo)

(Taken from the Saturday, April 21, 2001 edition of the Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, N.Y.)

(Note: Harley E. Orr was the son of Mildred Morgan Orr and Walter Orr. Mildred was born in Norwood, the daughter of Edson and Alta Morgan).

Hi all.  And Hi Shirley.  I’m not sure when I last saw you or you saw me.  I might have still been in diapers.

 

Jack (and everyone) I think it would be a great idea to have access to addresses for as many of our Morgan relatives as possible.  I wish there was a secure way for us to create a family address list that would be open to only family members (as opposed to anyone who might accidentally find their way to our website).  Is there any way for this to be done?  I understand and agree with the concerns about putting personal/private info on the Website as it really isn’t secure.  It would also be great to have a place for us to share current photos of ourselves so that cousins who haven’t had a chance to see one another for a while know what their cousins look like.  To that end, I’m sharing a picture I took of myself a couple of weeks ago. (Don’t tell my sisters - it’s a Christmas gift for them.)  Of all the pics I took, this one was an easy choice to make.  Look in the upper right hand corner.  My one year old West Highland Terrier (Jackson) snuck into the picture by climbing up on the staircase in back of me.  (Shirley, “snuck” is a word that I use all the time!)  When I reviewed all the pictures I had taken of myself and saw what Jackson had done, I knew this picture was going to have to be my official 57th year portrait!

 

Shirley, and any others who haven’t seen me since I was a kid, here’s what I look like now.

 

 

In lieu of an official address list, I’d love anyone getting this email to share their snail-mail address with me.

 

Bill Matson

(a.k.a. just plain billy)

Son of Bill and Ethel Matson

5704 39th Avenue

Hyattsville, MD  20781-1715

 

Are you sure you really want to do this Bill?  Lol…  since I am one generation removed from most to cousins, I guess I am a second cousin, although older then some of the cousins.  As you can see, I live in Theresa, NY with my wife Beverly, have two children Michael (who has granddaughter Kadence (5 months) ) in Antwerp and Jennifer (who has two grandsons, Hunter (9) and Riley (5) ) just outside of Watertown.  .  Anyone passing through Theresa is welcome to stop in my office at 133 Commercial St or give me a call using the 800 number below.  The picture below is of four generations of Morgan’s taken in June 2007, Me (Daren), Mike with daughter Kadence, and my father, Wayne.

 3menlady

 

Daren L. Morgan, P.L.S.

President

LaFave White & McGivern LS PC

PO Box 679

Theresa, NY 13691

1 800 427 9036

www.lwmlspc.com

Hi Chuck and all,
    One suggestion before everyone starts the recipe submittal to Cheryl....recommend each recipe show how many it serves.  Other than that the format looks great.  What do you think Cheryl?
Tom
PS  Little notes make it personal and warm like Chuck has done.

Welcome aboard Shirley,
    Been wondering when you'd jump in.  Isn't this just the greatest thing going.  All these Morgan decedents going back and forth.  You missed a great Morgan reunion this summer but don't you dare miss the next one.  By the way, I'm not really "the crazy" one as you mentioned...just spent too darn much time with the Morgan's when I was growing up. I could have been a normal Orr (whatever that is) but now I'm one of them.....and Love IT!!
    love you Sis,
    Tom

Lois and Lorraine,
   More from Henrietta....do you remember on one of your trips to Henrietta my taking you out to the haymow in the barn and tried to teach you how to jump off the high beams into the hay stack?  I remember your Mother discovering our fun and scolded me as she was so concerned you would hurt yourselves and Uncle John would be very upset.   I didn't understand...how could you get hurt jumping 20 feet into a hay stack?  Unless we missed the hay and landed on the barn floor... maybe that was what she meant.
Love you both,
Tommy 
PS  I think that is when Cheryl decided she was going to marry me.  What a Romeo I was....all I had to do was jump from the highest beam and I was the light of her life.

Hi Tom - Just vaguely do I remember that.  What I remember better is when I was visiting when I was 15.  I had the best time!  Your Mother was up visiting in Norwood.  I don't remember exactly how I got there.  Maybe your Dad drove your Mother to Norwood, and I went back with him.  He was still working then.  I remember sitting around the dinner table with Elaine, Shirley and your Dad after we tried eating that terribly tough rooster that Shirley cooked, and laughing our heads off.  I know I heard some stories about when you all were growing up, but I don't want to be the one telling tales that I only half remember.  I know your Dad sure got an ear full that night!
 
Lorraine

Thank you Chuck, I never knew anything about Harley's life after adulthood.  Sounds like he was one terrific guy.  Kinda like his brother Tom who is the only one I have been in contact with.  I do not remember spending any time in Henrietta but I do remember a few quick trips down there when my Dad went down to bring back those big gallon containers of cherries that were then canned by my Mom and lots of others.  I remember that he brought back lots of them!
Carol

Carol and others,
    Interesting that your visits to our place were for the cherries from the Sodus/Wolcott area.  That is how Dad met Mom.  He used to bring apples and cherries  up to the Marsh/Morgan clan along with the Marsh brothers who lived in Wolcott with Dad.  Dad was their same age and went to school with them.  I assume they got paid by someone to bring the fruit up each year.  During one of these trips, Mom met Dad and the rest is......a whole mess of Orr's.
    By the way, Mom and Dad both told the story of how Aunt Alice was Dad's "intended" but Mom snuck in between Aunt Alice and Dad in the truck seat during one of his deliveries and snatched Dad from Aunt Alice.  So how would that have changed things Dunbar's?  You would have been the ones to be singing Sam Sam at the next reunion instead of the Orr's.
    Love you all,
    Tommy

No, I don't remember the haystack jumping at all.  My memory is being on a horse and it reared and I fell off and was unconscious.  Mom found out - lots of explosions over that one!  I can still see the anger on Aunt Mildred's face.    Lois

Marge, Albert said that J.P. Morgan is on our line.  I waited (hate to be a know-it-all, you know) but no one supplied the words to Little Gray Rabbit:  There once was a little gray rabbit/who got into an awful bad habbit./ At the table, you know, when the clover was slow/this little gray rabbit would grab it./ His mother said now little sonny/ I want you to be a good bunny/your manners are bad, in fact they are sad/If I whip you it won't be so funny."

Hi Carol ... I remember the cherries too .. mom and dad would take one of us kids with them every year .. it was a BIG DEAL for us and we just couldn't wait .. they went to Wolcott and brought home many cans to fill orders from ppl in our area .. I was talking to mom about that while home this summer ... I will ask her again what they sold them for imagining that today, they would be outrageous in price .... p/s if you never went to spend time on Middle Road, you missed a bunch of fun ... remembering the pigs and the dairy truck that brought all the spoiled milk and cottage cheese for them to eat ... and of course Aunt Mildreds raspberry patch that became jam and a smidge of raspberry cordial .... alta

ah .... The Preacher and the Bear .. I can hear Uncle Walt now ... does anyone recall his little "shuffle" ... it would be hard to explain so must demonstrate when we are together again ... or Tom, being you are his total look-alike, I bet you have the genetics to shuffle in style .. do you know what I am talking about? .... alta

Wow!  When I lived in Geneva (NY, that is) in the early 1990s, my now 16 year old son began having seizures.  We made many trips to the University of Rochester/ Strong Memorial Hospital for tests and to see Jacob’s neurologist.  We stayed many times at the Ronald McDonald House.  What a Godsend that beautiful building was to our family.  As a matter of fact, my mother and I made a wreath during one of our stays there and we were asked by the person in charge if they could keep it as it was perfect for one of the rooms.  That was a long time ago… but my oldest son, Andrew, still talks about being able to play video games for free (that was obviously prior to home video game units of any quality, so it was exciting to him at the time!).

 

Cheryl

All Morgans look a like.  When my brother Jeff’s daughter got married in Connecticutt, not far from Springfield, one of the ushers was a Dan Morgan from that area.  A spittin’ image of David Morgan I thought.  So maybe some of Mile’s blood line that stayed in that area.

 Daren

Alta - I remember that "smidge" of raspberry cordial.  Yum Yum.  She sure was stingy.  We enjoyed it so much we made our own batch a few times(we meaning my husband John and me - not Helen - she never ever had a drink that I know of).  Lois

Sorry if this is a repeat – I had all kinds of trouble with my computer this morning & don’t know if this was sent – kept saying undeliverable to you all…so trying again.

 

 

Alta & all –

 

Alta asked about a song, other than Sam Sam The Lavatory Man, that my dad used to sing.  Well Walter Orr was a man of many songs, many of them made up on the spur of the moment I now realize, but I think the song you remember Alta that we had so much fun with that summer, and many, many summers, reunions, Christmas parties, and jam sessions, was Minnie the Mermaid (which actually IS a song!).  Do you remember it going something like….

 

            Oh what a night I had with Minnie the Mermaid

            Down at the bottom of the sea.

            Down among the coral,

            I forgot my ‘troubles’

            Gee but she was awfully good to me.

 

                        …etc…

(Dad changed some of the words to Protect The Innocent…or made some up to keep us giggling – not sure which!)

 

That was one of his famous songs & to this day, even my children remember it.  (I copied the chorus off the internet below)  There is even a children’s book that was published as a result of that song.  It’s one of my favorite ukelele moments of dad’s J

 

Linda (Orr) Reuther

 

 

 

Chorus:

Oh what a time I had with Min -nie the Mer -maid,

Down at the bot -tom of the sea;

I for -got my trou -bles, There a -mong the bub -bles,

Gee but she was aw -fly good to me.

And ev' -ry night when the star fish came out,

I'd hug and kiss her so.

Oh what a time I had with Min -nie the mer -maid,

Down in her sea -weed bun -ga -low

Lois,

Funny thing about that famous raspberry cordial. I remember the raspberry patch being mom & dad’s joy.  She made the very best raspberry pie, raspberry jam, and was free to share that raspberry cordial with anyone and everyone that happened by the Middle Road house – INCLUDING the various ministers that visited regularly over the years.  I think she forgot that into that stone barrel went not only raspberries & sugar but also gallons of vodka J  She was so famous for it, the minister and members of her church choir reminisced about it at her memorial service. 

Linda

Oh, yes, the fun we had on that hammock at the Breakeys. Was Uncle Fred's swing similar to what Aunt Ethel made for her lovely Rag Dolls. Living in Hong Kong for so many years, I missed out on family times but I remember getting together with my girls for at least 2 or 3 reunions, and I also managed to get to about 4 high school reunions and 3 or 4 college reunions which seemed to come just at the time I was home for the summer or for the year. God is good.

-God Bless---Marge

That is exactly the story on I think Little House on the Praire and Anne of Green Gables where the little old ladies made the cordial and gave it to the minister and how everyone always came back for it.
 Looks like I am back to a new 24 hour quota and send reply all again. I appreciated so much the article about Harley. I don't remember him at all except I did know he had adopted oriental children.I'm sure he must have been at that big party we had for his parents , I think a wedding anniversary that I attended. Because we spent our summers ast Lake Ozonia, we didn't travel much to visit relatives except to Norwood and Oswego where my Dad's mother lived until she moved to Massena. I remember visiting the Orrs more when I was older, like when we went to HOughton and also Paul and I visited them with the girls once. What I wrote to Tom is that I think we should make a cd of some of the old songs we knew as kids. Who wants to sing them and record them. Houghton College has an excellent new recording studio.

Lorraine
I thought no one but me remembered my first attempt at cooking a rooster. Mom was in Norwood and I was supposed to cook for dad. That old bird sure was tough as you said. I'd never cooked one before but had seen mom put chickens in water and boil them and make some delicious chicken and biscuits so I thought it would be a piece of cake.  Of course no one told me how long you had to cook one. That particular rooster was a nasty mean one that chased us every time we were anywhere near him and he had attacked my legs so I told dad if he would kill him or have Tom, I would cook him for supper. That's how that came about. Apparently I didn't cook it long enough because he was so tough you couldn't even cut the meat. (He was probably old too) Anyway I remember putting the food on the table and then the phone rang and I went to answer it and when I came back dad was looking around saying "Now what the heck happened to that fork." Then he looked up and it was stuck in the ceiling tile. He just said, "Oh I guess the meat is a little rubbery"  I've since gotten better at cooking chicken and can even make chicken and biscuits now.   


 Shirley 

my special uncle had so many songs ... I remember the mermaid song but I am still thinking about another and it just won't come to me ... it was similar to Sam Sam and oh how I laughed when he sang it ... those times are forever etched in my warm bank of memories ... Linda, remember when the news came out that I was pregnant for Leslie?  do you remember what we did? .. you dressed up as if you were pregnant also, we went to dinner then to the carnival ... we rode the teacup ride and the guy who was in charge of that ride decided to go get a soda and have a cigarette ... he left the ride unattended and we went round and round and round ... eww just thinking about it!!!  I started to feel sick so we shouted for him to shut the ride down so I could get off ... eventually he came back and I dashed behind something nearby and let 'er rip .. I was so sick!!! ...

Alta,
    That is a definite for the next reunion.  We will practice the Uncle Walt shuffle before hand.  I already remember well the Preacher and the Bear and will bring my Uke.  We will bring his memory to the stage.  Jean, Shirley and Linda....your with me right?  Start practicing.
   Tom


“The Preacher and the Bear” attached for those that are interested.  I will have to play this tonight to see if it rings any bells.
Daren
preacher1
preacher2
preacher3
preacher4
preacher5



Lois and all,
    What you didn't know is that in later years when Mom was in her 80's and still singing in the Methodist Church choir in Henrietta, they had a Christmas "pot luck" for the choir each year.  Mom took to bringing a bottle of her "recipe" which became a traditional highlight for the choir.  I assume they had their choir practice first and then the pot luck.  And this by my Mother, who I thought never smelled the cork of a bottle of "potion".  Dad sure did have an influence over her in later years.
    But the real treat from Mom's raspberry patch was her pies.  Oh my, what joy they brought for so many.  Even the preacher that did her funeral service had remarks about her famous raspberry pies.  Of course, that was standard for all the Morgan "girls" as I remember.
Tommy

Pat, we sure do have alot to do when we get together .. and what fun we are going to have!!!!!!  I think we need to get real serious and start talking about when and where ... the 4th of July is reunion time for the Orr's ... there is a wedding in the Haggett family on the 5th of July in 2008 ... I am sure others have family things also so let's start making plans by deciding what year first of all then narrow it down to the month ...
 
a reunion in the south, or in Rochester or somewhere in the Adirondacks are all excellent ideas .. my thoughts? ... I know for sure that my mom would not travel simply b/c she just can't anymore ... I doubt Aunt Rena or Aunt Ruby would be able to either .. not sure about Aunt Betty ... I think it would be respectful that we consider their needs in our decision making .. what do you all think?

All,
    I will weigh in with my thoughts... but only as suggestions.
As to the year 2008 or 2009, I have no preference.  We are certainly charged up and ready to go.
    I think we should seriously think about not taking the reunion out of the North Country as that is home and where we all want to return for memories etc.  I think we will see some of the Aunts and Uncle Bob if we stay local but will loose that segment and many others if we travel very far.  It seemed the last location was so ideal...why not take that or the Haggett farm as a site?
    I agree we need to decide on the year and the site soon so everyone can plan. 
Tommy (the crazy one)

Hi Shirley - yes, I remember the fork in the ceiling too.  I remember Elaine trying to catch that bird.  That sure was a fun dinner!
 
Lorraine

I think a two-day reunion mght be necessary, perhaps day one at the park(that was nice but too short), and day 2 at the farm if Aunt Olive and Uncle Bob can handle it, with everyone bringing their leftovers from the previous day, or a sack lunch.  It should definitely be the latter part of July so more can attend(there are several southerners who could not come to the last one due to school starting in August).  I just don't see how you can squeeze all this fun into one day!    Lois

I agree that the reunion should be left in our home area.  I like the Haggett house, but that is a lot of work - getting tables, chairs etc.  The place we were at last summer had everything except warm weather.  How about scheduling towards end of July so those who have children who start school early can attend?
 
Lorraine

I read quickly most of these emails going back and forth and then delete them (not saying that I don't enjoy them, because I do), but when Tom emailed that he had an envelope showing Mr. and Mrs. Quartus Morgan, 72 No. Main, I looked up that address in an old 1958 phone book, and that is where James Calnon Sr. lived, and where Alta or someone else said was the Morgan house. (Maureen Calnon Donovan lived there  for a while).  So who lived in the house across the road from the Rood farm, which was 92 Main St.--that ties in to the Morgan genealogy I believe, but now I'm not sure how?  Or am I nuts?

Chuck

Alta,
 
I agree, we should consider those family members who cannot travel well.  Somewhere close to Norwood or in the Adirondacks would probably be the best.  The farm would be wonderful but I am concerned about the work involved in having it at someone's house.  It sounds like the place where it was held last year would be great and I vote for sometime near the Orr family reunion so they could just extend their time a little on either end.  Who is getting married in the Haggett family.  Whatever is done we must remember to not stay in our own little family groups.  Getting re-acquainted with those we have not seen (or even known) is the whole purpose of family reunions, hope we all will make a special effort in that direction.
Love, Carol

Cheryl,   Here is a receipe for the book---it is my favorite
 
                                                     Receipe for one
                                      
                                          1-telephone
                                          1-telephone book
                                          1-dial a phone #
                                          1-place an order
                                          simmer for 20 to 30 mins.
                                          1-answer the doorbell
                                          1-pay and tip the deliveryperson
                                          1-open the pizza (large)
                                          1-open a beer(or maybe 2)
                                          1-sit and enjoy
                                          Lastly---take a "big nap"
 
ps--I do cook--my Mother Ruby taught me how to survive--maybe i can find some of her receipes.  Betty Crocker helps me now.   Wayne
 
Hi Everyone,
As I am reading through all of these e-mails I have come to a couple of conclusions, as I am sure that you have also.
1.  Many of us regret not talking to more of our family at this past reunion.  If one of the elder Morgan's took it upon themselves to be the MC and introduced everyone, using a microphone, and told a little tidbit about them I think that would be a great help.  I nominate shy Alta to do this.  It will be good for her to break out of her shell.
2.  I am really enjoying the pictures and it is helping to put people together by seeing their faces and remembering a story that they are telling (via e-mail).  If more of us could send a few pictures, I would really enjoy looking at them.
3.  My Grandfather, Fred, used to always sing or chant something about beans in the pot to us.  Some like them hot, some like them cold, some like them in the pot, .....days old.  Wouldn't it be neat to have some of these songs and poems scattered throughout our cookbook? 
Thanks for listening!
Cheryl
Chuck's daughter - can you believe he lit a stream on fire?  No wonder he never took us to Rochester to meet our relatives!  He was afraid more stories, the excellent, juicy ones, would emerge and all hell would break out on Cottage Street when we got home.

Alta,

I’ll never forget it.  We went to dinner, just as bold as if we owned the world, at the airport restaurant – very exclusive place of the times with pillows under our shirts, and some kind of fake rings on our fingers.  And then on to the Rush Carnival.  Thought we’d never get off that ride, and I remember holding your hair away from your face, yes.  Weren’t we riding around in the Volkswagen Bug in those days?  Or my Fiat.  Can’t remember.  Goodness it’s amazing how things that seem inconsequential at the time can become such warm memories.

 

I wouldn’t know where to start with memories of Norwood and the Haggett farm in the summer when I got to spend a week.  I remember hot, hot days and endless baling of hay; and the smell of Aunt Olive fixing her hamburger / bread / potato meal with homemade bread, and warning the boys to ‘leave some for everyone else’ as it got passed around the table – a new concept to this girl that grew up pretty much alone; I remember sleeping on mattresses out in the front yard watching the stars and picking names for our children (were we about 13 / 14 then??); I especially remember the lucky one night each summer that Aunt Olive let you and me and Bobby and Carl walk to Norfolk in the evening with enough money to buy 1 Chef Boyardee box pizza.  We’d proudly bring it home, make it, and while playing cards until we were threatened with switches to go to bed, we’d each get about a 2’x2” piece of pizza….and it was the BEST thing in the world J  I remember climbing into the back of the pick up truck in the days when you could ride in the back of trucks to get an ice cream cone, and to pick berries when Uncle Bob drove us.  I could go on forever, but I’ll save some for later.  They are wonderful memories!!

Linda

Lorraine and Lois,
 
One recipe that I remember of your Mom's (and it was only at family gatherings/dinners at your house that I remember eating this) is a dark brown bread.  Graham bread?  I remember it being round.  Did she bake it in a used coffee can?  I have such a distinct memory of this.  Did I dream it, or did she really make this wonderful dark brown bread?
 
-- Bill

Bill - she made a wonderful dark brown bread called graham bread(made with graham flour).  I can submit the recipe - give me 10 minutes.....Lois

Daren and Chuck,
    I agree Daren...we better be careful.  I suggest we have someone at the plug to the sound system ready to pull the plug when appropriate.    Shy little Alta....anyone that believes that, needs to come to the reunion....it's obvious you never met Cousin Alta.
    And we love you all the more for it Alta!!   Now make your head go up and down because we know you will make the best MC ever.    Chuck and I are way too shy so let's eliminate that option.  Besides, we will be off riding the amphibian somewhere or looking for a good creek to set ablaze.
    One more thing; do you really feel comfortable having the reunion at the farm?  If you do and are sure it will not be a burden on your parents or you and the Hogget's, then I say we go with the farm for the site.  I agree with many that the river site last year was great, but there are so many memories for most of us up there on the hill at the farm.  Maybe Brian can even have some hay ready to bale for all of us to join in again.  Won't be like the days with the old loose hay of course.  Oh, was it hot in that hay mow.  (No Chuck, I wasn't up there with the Breakey girls).
Tom

One of Aunt Mildred's recipes that the Matson kids LOVED was her ground beef barbeque.  I remember that on one of our Morgan family blueberry picking adventures up around Hams Inn, Aunt Mildred brought one huge pot of that barbeque.  To heat it up, Uncle Walt left their car running, lifted the hood and put the pot of barbeque right on top of the engine block.  That was great beef barbeque.  That was one of the recipes that made it into the Matson family cookbook (which is titled, "Who Will Bake the Bread?").
 
Like our Grandmother Morgan and all of our Mom's and Aunt's (and maybe even some of our Uncles), my Mom (Ethel Morgan Matson) was a prodigious baker and bread maker.
 
Quoting from the forward written in the Matson family cookbook:  "When she became ill and was close to the end of her life [our Mom] wondered out loud with Mary Lou, 'Who will bake the bread?'  When you stop and think about it, the depth and profundity of this question is hauntingly beautiful.  She knew her life would soon be over, yet her concern was for the nuture and well-being of her family.  Who will bake the bread?  Like her bread, her life and faith had been an important source of nourishment for her family and friends.  Her life and faith had been a bread of life for those who knew her.  So she asked the question, 'Who will bake the bread?'  And the answer is, of course, WE must bake the bread!"  [end of quote]
 
Our family cookbook includes photos of all the quilts my Mom had made over the years, including one she made when she was 16 years old.  (My sister Helen Sperry has this quilt.)  Along with favorite family recipes we shared stories/memories connected to many of the recipes.  One such recipe and memory I shared is as follows.
 
UPSIDE-DOWN (on the flour) STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE
2 qts strawberries sliced and sweetend
2 cups flour
2 TBS sugar
3 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1/3 cup butter
1 cup milk
 
Mix flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in bowl.  Cut in butter.  Stir in milk until blended.  Bake in greased pie pan at 450 for 12-15 minutes.
 
Split hot shortcake into two layers and spread with 1/2 berries.  Place 2nd layer on top and cover with remaining berries.
 
The best person to give testimony as to the taste and flavor of this dessert is [my sister] Helen.  At least on one occassion she was the ONLY member of the family to get a piece of shortcake before she dropped it upside-down on the floor!!  To this day she says it was an accident . . . and it probably was.  Stil . . .
 
The open field across the street from our home on 56 Prospect Street and the woods behind our house were loaded with alpine strawberries.  As children we would spend hours in the field and woods gathering these tiny berries.  They had an intoxicating fragrence that sweetened the air, and their taste was incomparable to any strawberry you could imagine.  We would carry our tasty treasures home in a jar or makeshift container and "hull" the berries (remove the green stems and caps).  Mom would make a shortcake for the family that evening.  You can't imagine how delicious a shortcake these wonderful tiny berries made.
[end of entry]
 
I think a Morgan family cookbook would be wonderful!!
 
Hugs to all,
Bill

Dad (Fred) and Mom and I (I was probably 8 - 10 years) also went to Wolcott to get cherries.  We stayed with Howard (and, I think, Marge) Marsh, visited Glendon (and I can almost say her name, but not quite - quite a large and friendly woman), and saw Kenyon Marsh (who later got Dad started in the TV business).  Glendon and Howard were, I believe, the children of one of Grandma (Alta) Morgan's brothers.  Kenyon was Glendon and ESTHER'S son.  It was my first time through Philadelphia and I was enchanted with the miniature mountain village there (on Main St.) beside the pond.  I also loved staying on Howard's farm overnight - they had a nice collie.  That may have been the first time I saw TV, a snowy Howdie Doodie, but I think that was a later trip.  Dad had an old pick-up with a wood rack on the back (which he covered for a camping trip that we took with the Dunbars at Fish Creek) and we slept in it.  Fun time, too.

Hi Joan and all - I remember stopping in Wolcott once on our way to Rochester.  I don't remember who we saw there, but they invited us to stay for lunch, and I think it was one of the most delicious meals I ever had - I can even remember - Hamburgers and warm raspberry pie!  I'm thinking that maybe Aunt Alice was with us also.
 
Lorraine

you guys are all fruitcakes!!    .... me? ... I am the most put together of all  ... and if you believe that!!! ... then I have a chunk of land out here that I want to sell ya!!! ... lol
 
anyway, it really makes no difference to me where we get together ... I suggested the farm for selfish reasons b/c it would be easier for my parents (that was my first reason) .. my second is this .. we have had so many there that it just feels right ... and thirdly, if those who are traveling will be in campers, there are tons of "lots" to pitch a tent or camper and just kick back without having to pay or be next to ppl you don't know ... mom and dad would not do any of the work .. Brain would be happy to get a tent put up and all neccessary tables and chairs ... plenty of space for horseshoes, volleyball, kick ball and if the guys need to set the river on fire, there are at least 4 quads filled with gas that would take them to the river ... if the older folks get tired, they can go inside and pass out on the couch or lay down in one of the many beds ...
 
we could do like last year and everyone bring their own picnic with the option of a few grills for those who wanted to cook chicken, dogs or burgers ... and we also have the option of catering if ppl want to chip in the money .. my brother-in-law is in charge of one of the dining rooms at Clarkson .. I am sure arrangements could be made .. lots of options ... we just need to decide and do it!!! ..
 
I say lets choose from either the 28th of June weekend or the 12th of July weekend .. seems to me that more responses have been for either of those ... the 4th of July weekend is out for several other events so let's choose ... send in your votes!!!
 
lastly, the MC ... gosh, if you guys (i.e. Chuck, Tom and Daren) want to be wimps about this, then I will step to the plate and be the big mouth!!!  bring the mics and an amplifier and I'll let 'er rip!!! ... oooppps, I mean, I will be the announcer ...
 
I think we should consider a 2 days event for those who can't make one of them ... I suggest the farm for the picnic and Rogers Taj Mahal for the nightcap ... waiting on your votes!!

... Roger has a copy of both 1988 and 1989 reunions ... I believe the spoof on the Morgan Boys quartet was in 1989.  Aunt Betty, my mom, myself and my daughter Alta were the culprits who TRIED to sing "Oh the Bulldog on the Bank".... mom was hilarious (she looked so much like Uncle Ray)(she even took her fake front tooth out for the occassion) ... both mom and I strung a hoola hoop through the waist band of our britches so we could fill them out .. our band with Cheryl Breakey Robinson as conductor happened in 1988 ...
Alta
Hey, that's real proof that ALTA is the "shy" one, NOT.

-God Bless---Marge

Hi Alta - Yes, I'm sure that was the event.  I remember it being at your house, and I think, in the wintertime.  The gold old days!
 
Love,
Lorraine

Probably the best one can do is give everyone nametags again. Don't tell them in advance. If they don't want to wear it they won't. Those who want to socialize with others will. The family pictures would be good and then later can be shown on a computer or on a screen for very everyone to see. Second cousins who don't want to socialize, won't probably even come. I say that we need to have the reunions every year while Uncle Bob and Aunt Olive and Aunt Betty, Aunt Rena, Aunt Ruby are still with us.

-God Bless---Marge

Jack and Tom, I have enjoyed looking at the pictures you submitted, Tom.  Had to go back to the geneology to find out who Authur Morgan was - couldn't remember.  But, there is one picture of a Marsh, and I don't know who he is. Rufus Marsh.  Probably a great grandparent but I'm embarassed I don't know.
 
Also noticed a Cora Morgan who was born in 1865.  It was been a long time since I've been to the Cemetary, but there is a small stone for a Cora and I don't know if it's a Marsh or Morgan.  I remember being there once with Uncle Ray and we asked who she was and all I remember is that they said she died by a swinging lamp.  Doesn't that sound like him?  He went on to explain that she died at age 16, I think he said, of a brain tumor, and they thought she might have gotten it from all the times she would be leaning over the table and hitting her head on the lamp.  I don't know if that plot where Grandma and Grandpa are buried is a Morgan plot, or Marsh plot.  Does anyone know anything about Cora?  Cora Morgan was the only Cora I saw.
 
Lorraine

The new pictures that have been added to the Website are wonderful.
 
Tom, you put on a pic of old Great-Grandpa Rufus Marsh!  I didn't know a photo of him existed.  Wonderful!  What a stinker he was, though.  Anyone else heard the stories about him?  As I understand it, he received a head injury during the Civil War and was never right after that.  I think he lived in a veterans home down around Rome, NY but occasionally returned to the North Country and made life a bit difficult for Great-Grandma Marsh and the family.  Anyone heard specifics about this?
 
AND, Tom (and all the other Orrs!) I'm astonished at your mother's handwriting.  It is EXACTLY the same as my mother's.  They must have had the same penmenship teachers.
 
-- Bill(y)

Well, Bill, you answered my question as to who Rufus was.  I never heard any stories about him. 
 
And, Tom, thanks for getting the picture of Laddie in with your pictures.  Looks the way I remembered, as well as I can tell, but looks like he was just a puppy when the picture was taken.
 
Lorraine

In addition to family reunions, I have LOTS of other memories of spending time on the Haggett Farm with my cousins.  On at least one occasion every winter we would gather at the farm and fill those old wash tubs up with freshly fallen snow.  Aunt Olive would boil down maple syrup from the sugar bush and it would be drizzled on top of the tubs of snow.  It was boiled down to the point that when it hit the cold snow it would become carmel/taffy-like.  With a fork we would pick up a drizzle and eat it.  YUM!!!  So sweet.  So good.  It was so sweet that you could only eat a few pieces in a row.  Then you'd grab a dill pickle from the table and eat it.  The dill pickle would cut the sweetness in your mouth, and you could then return to the tub of "Wax on Snow."  That's what we called it - Wax on Snow.  Am I remembering this right, cousins?
 
-- Bill(y)

Half of the fun is all the chit chat back and forth. and whose to say that wouldn't be historical in the future. I think Jack should leave it all in, easier too, otherwise their will be gaps in the conversations. And then no one will be "hurt", ha, because their conversation was left out. Whose to say, what's important and what isn't. So make your life easy Jack, if you have room on the site, put it all on until it is too much, then you can delete it except for the historical facts. I have a video of the 150th anniversary at the church. I think Tom said he had one too. David Dunbar had a big screen at the last reuniion set up to sing some hymns, but everyone left. So maybe he could bring it so we can see family pictures of other reunions, and pictures that will be taken on digital  cameras and hook it up to a computer and then to his big screen. You technical guys will know more about it.

-God Bless---Marge

Bill, that is a great memory. Sounds like fun. How's your little dog behaving? He is so cute. Glad you brought him with you  last summer.
I am sure we all bringing back to our memories the old memories is good for our memory. We need to keep these conversations going so we don't get alzheimers. I also heard that keeping in touch with old firends is very important as we  age. Maybe it is just so we can talk about old times. Wow, now we don't even have to get together to do it, thanks to internet and email. Bruce told me about Cheryl Breakey drinking kerosene and Joan eating rat poison. I don't remember reading that.
-God Bless---Marge

Good point Joan,
    Maybe just a good job of Jack using his discretion would do it.  I yield to the majority opinion.  And let's keep up this great exchange that let's us get to know each other better and have fun doing it.
Love you all,
Tom

Margie and all,
    I second the nametag thing...those that don't want to wear them don't have to.  It is a great way to be able to meet cousins we have never seen or not seen since the 80's.  I think last years had the Edson/Alta "child's" name (Helen/Mildred) to show the family linkage which helped and especially the 2nd cousins.   Back in an earlier reunion we even used color coded nametags to show family connection....didn't we Alta?
Tom

Don't get me wrong. I enjoyed it too, even though I mainly was taking photos then. It is just too bad that it didn't lead into something else instead of people leaving so quickly. In fact, Dave had set up something to continue to sing together but everyone left.

-God Bless---Marge

That's a great idea. Then we at least know their family connection and are more likely to converse with them.

-God Bless---Marge

Lorraine,
    Rufus Marsh was the Father of Alta Lora Marsh, (our grandma) and was married to Addie Graves who bore 9 children: Ray Marsh, Fred Marsh (Wolcott group), Cora Marsh (died as a baby in my notes), Grace Marsh McGee, Alta Marsh Morgan, Frank Marsh, Dora (Dorothy) Marsh Fields 2nd m. Carvelho, George.  Also shows a 1/2 brother named Carey with a note "illegitimate".  There was an entry as an offspring named Flora, but has been crossed off on my records.  Anyone have any information on Flora?
    I remember my Mom telling that Great Grandpa Rufus Marsh was not home a lot as he traveled around the state in connection with some military connection he had from service days.  Mom said "Grandpa only came home long enough to get Grandma pregnant and then was gone again".  She said he was "a bit of a woman's man" followed with a smile.   Not sure these are things to pass along, but they are memories none the less.
    Another note in my records says:  "Rufus Marsh born 1842  N. Stockholme, NY died 1924.  Rufus Marsh's folks came from Vermont in covered wagon and took up homesteads in Stockholme".
    I have no other info on Cora except that she was a Marsh and died early.  Most all the pictures of the Marsh family are on the website now....thanks Jack.
Tom

We still have our name tags.  Why doesn't everyone who kept them at least bring those back with them.  Bill went to a lot of pains, and expense, I expect, to have those made for us.
 
Lorraine

Bill,
    You are right...I too have always been amazed at our Mothers handwriting being almost indinguishable.  Aunt Olive's is also very much the same.
    As to Rufus Marsh, yes that is what Mom told me as well about him.  She said something about the Civil War and injuries and that is why he was such a problem to Great Grandma Addie Graves Marsh.  My Mom never had a lot of endearing words to say for him. 
    Anyone else have any memories of Rufus from their folks?
Tom

Yes Bill,
    I too remember that.  I remembered it as "snow Jack" but that is probably because as a child "snow wax" sounded close to "snow Jack".   Loved those days along with the endless buckets of blueberries the family would go off picking near the farm.
Tom

Agree Margie,
    Leave in the chit chat.   Also let's try to get David to bring the screen again as I have two videos of past reunions which are now on disks that could be shared.
Tom

Good idea Lorraine,
    I think some of us left them in the box for Bill to retrieve.
Tom

Tom and all - from the picture of Rufus, I can't imaging him being a ladies' man.  Those women must have been hard up - Sorry, Grandpa Rufus!
 
Does anyone have the lineage of the Marsh Family?  I remember my Mother saying that Grandma Morgan thought there were some Morgans way back in her family, and I think it was Bill that also mentioned that.  I wonder how many generations back.
 
I'm getting more and more curious about the Cora who is buried in Grandma and Grandpa's plot.  If the snow melts before we get back up there for the reunion, why doesn't someone check that plot?  I know I'm going to get up there this time!!
 
Lorraine

I don't know anything about Rufus, but reading your email, Tom, reminded me that I could swear the handwriting on one of those pictures was my Mother's!!
 
Lorraine

Welcome Kathy and Bruce,
You've already missed a lot of great exchange, but thanks to Jack, you can catch up with us all on the Morgan website where he has recorded everything.  (Better have lots of time on your hands)
Love you
Tom

Lorraine and others,
    We should all bring something with our Mother's handwriting on it to the reunion and I bet we will see that all of the girls had very similar handwriting.  Genes?
Tom

Lorraine,
 
       I have my Mom's lineage of the Marsh family and when I have the time I'll pull it out and confirm exactly where the Morgans/Marshes were linked up prior to the reconnection with our Grandparents.
 
Tom,

Have you thought about comparing the handwriting of your mothers with the handwriting of your grandmother?  Quite often children learn (especially back then) penmanship from their mother.
Just my two cents worth... so you don't think I haven't been paying attention and reading my emails.  LOL
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Marsh and Morgan @ Riverside Cemetery
MARSH ADDIE M.  WIFE OF RUFUS , 1846 , 1924  G 17
MARSH CORA M  (DAUGHTER OF R.H. & A.M. MARSH) , 1871 , 1888  G 17
MARSH GEORGE H.  SON OF RH & AM MARSH , 1873 , 1875  G 17
MARSH RUFUS H.  (CO D 2ND REG VT VOLS; POST 167 GAR) , 1840 , 1924  G 17
MORGAN ALTA L. MARSH  (WIFE OF EDSON) , 1886 , 1948  G 17 
MORGAN EDSON H.   , 1882 , 1944  G 17 
MORGAN RICHARD  (SON OF RAY AND MARION MORGAN) , 1930 , 1930  G 17 
MORGAN PHILLIP SCOTT  SON OF WAYNE & ANN MORGAN"  December 27, 1964  H 20 
MORGAN DORSAN D. 78   December 20, 1907  B 26 
MORGAN ERNEST W.  (DIED AUG. 11,??//STONE NOT LEGIBLE)    B 26 
MORGAN MARY G. 87 WIFE OF DORSAN  April 9, 1888  B 26 
MORGAN SARAH 31   December 1, 1893  B 26 
MORGAN EDNA E  WIFE OF QUARTUS , 1849 , 1926  G 37 N
MORGAN PEARL  (NO INFO)    G 37 N
MORGAN QUARTUS M.   , 1848 , 1934  G 37 N
MORGAN WILLIE DOLLEY  ("INFANT"/NO OTHER INFO)    G 37 N
MORGAN BARBARA V.   , 1929   J 65 
MORGAN WAYNE A.  ("SON OF CLYDE AND RUBY") , 1933   J 65 
MORGAN CLYDE M. 83 NFD June 09, 1908 December 03, 1991 1991/12/03 J 66 
MORGAN RUBY Z. MATSON  CLYDE , 1915   J 66 
MORGAN MARION E. 89 RAY September 07, 1910 January 05, 2000 2000/01/05 J 69 S2
MORGAN REV. RAY L 85 ("WED APRIL 14, 1928") September 09, 1906 December 10, 1991  J 69 
MORGAN FRED B 80 RENA E         NFD July 26, 1913 March 18, 1994 1994/03/18 J 72 ?
MORGAN RENA E. BROWN  FRED January 18, 1914   J 72 
MORGAN M. ANNETTE DAWSON  DAVID MORGAN December 27, 1945 October 14, 1973  J 95 S
The above  is part of a database that I have on the Riverside Cemetery.  It consists or a stone census that I did several years ago, and also information that other people also provided--if someone sees errors, do me a favor and tell me what they are.  Marsh and Morgan names--some still living, since it comes from a stone census.  (The letter near the end is the section of the cemetery that they are buried in, and the number is the plot they are in).  Chuck

Bill, I had forgotten that I have copies of what your Mother had.  I'd forgotten all about it.  Will get it out and look at it, and write if I have any question.  Thank you.
 
I love hearing these antidotes of our ancesters.  Keep them coming.  I find it so interesting; we know almost next to nothing about our Father's life before he married into the Morgan Family.  I have been told, though, that he loved being part of a large family.
 
Lorraine

Thank you Chuck!  That answers the question of Cora.
 
Lorraine

Of course one of the dangers of oral history is that imbedded in the stories could be some things that aren't remembered correctly, hence very inacurrate (if not false).  Short of documentation, the more stories we can share with one another the more we might be able to sort out fact from fiction.
 
-- Bill
no matter how hard I try to write differently than that of my mother, as I age, my letters get smaller and more "hen-scratchy" .. I DO believe genetics plays a HUGE part in everything we are made of .... Alta

Thank you Pat.  That is very appropriate.
 
In the video I watched this afternoon of the reunion of 1988, there were several shots of your Mother.  Have you seen this?  I could make copy and mail to you, but someone earlier mentioned they have it on DVD.  That may be clearer.  Was that you, Alta, or Tom?  Could whoever has the DVD cut one for Pat,, or am I stepping out of turn?
 
Lorraine

wow!! .. all I ever heard about Rufus was he wasn't a nice person, he wasn't around long enough to help in the rearing of his children and usually left after Gramma Addie got pregnant ... I believe I heard mom say only one time, that he was "abusive" .. what that entailed, I have no idea ... war wounds or not, he wouldn't have my vote as being a favorite relative!!!
Alta

I have a copy (VHS) of the 1988 reunion ... let me see what I can do to get it transferred to DVD ... I am not a whiz at any of this so I will ask for help .... Alta

Here I am replying to my own email posting!  (Someone, PLEASE, tell me to get a life!!)
 
I wanted to say one more thing re: my previous post about sharing stories and confirming memories.  Even if you might not have anything you think is "worth adding" (but, mind you, we all do!  really!), it's helpful when folks are able to resond with a "Yes, I heard that, too."  Or, "That's how I remember it."  When dealing with oral histories, confirmation/corroboration of stories/memories is an important tool in sorting through memories/information.
 
-- Bill

yes Bill .. "Wax on Snow" and you were certain to scoop up white snow in the dish and not yellow!!!!  

I think the name tags (if you kept them) are a great idea .. bring them along!!! .. they were well put together and I thank Bill once again for his hard work and efforts ...
 
I need an extension on mine however .. with so many changes in last names, I ran out of room !!!!

Consider it done, Alta!  Just wait until you see your name tag for the next reunion!
 
-- Bill

Marge and all .. I think we learned by our last years mistakes ... many things "should" have happened but they didn't ... no big deal ...  I was sooooooooooo pleased to see that over 75 of us got together at a new place ... we brought lots of eat, we brought our memories and we got to reconnect with ppl we hadn't seen in ages ... it was cold that day which may have been part of the reason ppl packed up and left so early ... but, we are true Morgans .. we continued the partaaaaaaay the next evening which was a precious time of sharing!! ... perhaps we can focus on 2008, come prepared with a unique experience to share and make 2008 even more successful .....

I think I may be sorry that I asked for something!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

yes I am shy Marge!! ... my mom MADE me sing in that quartet!!!  

Lorraine ~
    You are not out of line at all!  I would LOVE to have a copy of the video.  I have not seen it.  I know this is pushing it a little, but if I could get it from someone soon then I could take it with me to Calif. when I go for Christmas and a lot of my family there could see it.  If that is not a reasonable request then it can wait.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

I recall my mother(Helen) talking about Cora when we would go to the cemetery.  I am quite sure she is in the Marsh plot, and Mom would talk about Cora dying around the age of 16/17 from hitting her head on a chandelier.  Seems like Mom would say she was very tall and used to hit her head alot.  I am quite sure her birth date and death date are on the stone.   Lois

Lorraine and Pat,
    I have the DVD we made from the 1988 reunion and I will cut a copy and mail it to Pat soonest.
    Jack and Chuck also have copies already that I sent to them.  Would be fun to show that this next summer.
Tom

Tom ~
    Thank you!  Thank you!! Thank you!!!  No wonder you're my favorite, kissin' cousin.  Oops!  Did I say that in front of everybody???
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

hey all .. in the picture next to Rufus's (Tom Orr's pix), I think Gramma Morgan is the gal on the right not the left ... I see resemblence of my mother and her sisters in the lady to the right .... what do you think? ....

Hi all,
 
Harold and I just finished watching a VCR tape that our
daughter's husband made of the 1989 reunion.  This was the one where Aunt Olive, et all did the take-off on the Uncle Ray quartet.  It was hysterical!  Also, Tom you did a great job introducing the families.  Alta and her girls (I think) did a wonderful rendition of "Side by Side".  Tom and two of his daughters did "In the Garden" and Margie's girls did a beautiful violin piece.  I do not know how to make a DVD but have a good friend who can do it.  As soon as I get it done will be happy to send it to anyone interested.  Pat, I know you would like one before your Christmas trip.  Anyone wanting a copy please send me your address.
 
God sure works his wonders - with all this correspondence going on, (Jack thank you again for starting it all) the memory of this tape just popped in.  I had forgotten all about it!  Shame on me.  The tape is beautiful and so good to view those who have now gone on.  Bill, another thing that is special for me is the quilt story you told and it does break my heart to see your father's grief so strong.   What wonderful memories you all have shared.
 
Love you all!
Carol
 
P. S.  I did talk to my mother tonight and she says she remembers when Uncle Ray, Uncle Fred and my Dad, Clyde moved Rufus into the Riverside Cemetery.  Her short term memory is really bad but some old things she remembers quite well when given a prompt.

Cousins all, please take a day or two off and let me catch up.  Love, Joan

Alta,
    Looking at it again, I think you may be right.  We need to take the picture and show it to your Mom, Aunt Ruby and Aunt Rena to get their opinion. 
    Jack, can you make a copy and one of your family take it to your Mom, Aunt Ruby and Aunt Olive to get their opinion.
I may well have labeled it wrong even though I have checked it with several of the family.  Maybe Aunt Betty could give us a look as well.  Cheryl N., can you bring the photo up on the website and see if your Mom can ID it for us?
    Tom

Yup - I agree.  Our Grandmother was the pretty one!
 
Lorraine

I would really like to have a copy of Carol's DVD as well as Tom's. My address is Marjore Pang, 16321 Keypointe Place, La Mirada, CA 90638 562-943-7558

-God Bless---Marge

Thank you, Carol ~
    Yes, I would like a copy of the 1989 reunion, as well as the 1988 one that Tom is sending me.  How very thoughtful of you... you must be a Morgan!  LOL  My California family, especially my sister, will enjoy watching them with me.
My address is:
Pat Morgan
2635 S Saint Paul St
Denver, CO 80210-6220

Joan ~
    How long have you lived in Potsdam?
    Many of you remember my mother (Aunt Irene, wife of Frank Morgan).  Well, she would always call Potsdam "Kettledarn"! Thought you might get a kick out of that.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Hi Everyone...
I'm ashamed to admit that I've been enjoying reading all of the
memories, messages, bantoring, etc that has come across the email, but
not responding. I too have many wonderful memories of summers and
reunions in Norwood with my folks, Mildred and Walter, and will one day
soon share some of those good times with all of you. Carol, your offer
of the 1989 reunion DVD finally got me to jump on board. I would love to
have a copy. My address is Jean (Orr) Sparks, 6176 Elm St., Conesus, NY
14435.

Hi all,
    I'm a bit confused.  Was there a 88 and 89 reunion or just an 88 reunion?  The Video I have has Cheryl introducing her family and she died Feb 1989..right? 
Tom

Jean ~
    Welcome aboard!  No harm "listening" in for a while, but we do look forward to having you share your memories too.  I was just thinking earlier today that we had not heard from you or Norm for a while.  I loved that "And Then It's Winter" so just had to share it.  If we don't watch out time will pass us by.  I am so glad to be a part of this group of cousins sharing memories and love for one another.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

You're right, Tom.  There were two reunions, back to back - 1988 and 1989.  A lot happened after the 1988 reunion - my Mother died Sept. 30, 1988, Aunt Ethel died Oct. 30, 1988 and Cheryl died Feb. 10th, 1989. 
 
Lorraine

Carol, I would like a copy of the 1989 reunion also, but you don't have to mail it.  I expect to see you one of these days.  If not, just bring to the 2008 reunion.  Thanks loads.
 
Love,
Lorraine

Chuck,  I don,t see your name on the Morgan/Marsh headstone data base. Are you supertitious?  Wayne

there was one both years Tom

Joan, I can relate to the gap between kids.  I feel like I had three families. The first four came close. 3 boys and 1 girl than eight ears later another girl and then (in my forties) 10 years later the baby. (girl) I already had three kids graduated when that happened. My three girls are all 10 years apart. One is 25, one is 35 and one is 45 years old.

Shirley 

I haven’t read all the e-mails yet, so if the Cora curiosity has been satisfied, I apologize.  According to Aunt Olive, Cora would have been a sister to Grandma Morgan.
Tom… I received the Orr cookbook today.  Mom also received the lovely card… and it meant a lot to her.  It made her a little weepy.  Thank you so much for your thoughtfulness!
Love ya,

Cheryl

Hi, all!  Good eyes, Alta!  No doubt that the pic is labeled wrong.  Grandma Morgan is on the right, not the left.  I showed the pic to Mom and she also verified it.
Later!
Cheryl

OK… in Tom’s pics part II, the second picture down is labeled Morgan Siblings.  Aunt Alice’s name is crossed out and Mom’s name was added.  After close examination of the picture, it is, indeed, Aunt Alice.  Mom and Dad were living in Cleveland at the time and probably wouldn’t have been around.

 Cheryl

Hi Cheryl - I just looked at the picture in question and totally agree with you.  Do you think Tom needs to use magnifying glasses?  I know that I do!!  Sad!  Just wait until you get to be our ages!!
 
Lorraine

Bill, when I worked at Massena Lib., a woman came in frequently who claimed to be of the SECOND family of Rufus Marsh.  She was elderly and a bit eccentric and I hesitated to dig info from her, but she was always very friendly and seemed to feel we had a lot in common!  Another story a brother told me is that Rufus was originally buried in Parishville (?) and after a while Ray & Clyde said he'd been punished long enough and they brought him down to be buried beside Addie.  Also, my mother told me once that Rufus sold the farm right out from under blind old Addie.  Joan

The mention of blueberries reminds me of the wonderful bacon that Aunt Mildred used to bring to Joe Indian when we were vacationing there.  Then she'd have us pick blueberries and make blueberry pancakes for the whole gang.  Don't know where the woman found her energy!  Love, Joan

The thing I looked forward to most, and regretted the most, is that we didn't have a great old hymn-sing at last summer's reunion.  I'd go a long way to hear my cousins bring down the roof with their voices.  Love, Joan

hey all .. there was a gentleman in the checkout line at the drug store this evening .. he was wearing a hunter green wool zip up jacket .. a bit of advertising on the back and in big numbers 1997 championship ... there was a picture of a horse in the very center and above the horse was the name Morgan and beside the name Morgan was the word Champion .. I asked him where he obtained the jacket .. he said his daughter sells clothing and that was in her line one year ... he did say that he had a love for the Morgan horse (which by the way I thought was a quarter horse .. this man said the Morgan horse was smaller) ... anyway, I mentioned that I was a direct Morgan descendant ... isn't it interesting how in everyday life, ppl cross your path and somehow there is a connection? .. just thought I would share ....  Alta

we'll have to put that on the agenda for next summer Joan ... we DID bring down the church ceiling the Sunday following the reunion at Red's .. we sang "My Tribute" and Bill directed while Cheryl accompanied ... mom has a copy of the service .. stop by the farm .. she would be more than happy to have you check it out ....

Wow, Joan!!  We might have a whole bunch more cousins out there!!
 
Lorraine

Alta, you need to read about the Morgan horse, it was and is an all around work horse.  Very special (as all Morgan’s are  J )

 Daren

 

Hi Daren - I had always thought the Morgan Horse was a workhorse, but according to the history of the Morgan Horse, it was a racehorse.  Or at least it was raced until faster breeds were developed.  At least that's what I understood.

I will second that.  How can we not sing some of the old hymns!  Alta, how interesting regarding the Morgan horse.  We have a Morgan family living here next door to us but we have not been able to find a connection.  Alta, have we definitely settled on July 12th?  It looks like everyone has not sent an opinion.  How about it cousins?
Carol

We had a hymn sing at Roger's the next day, but we had no music so Etta Ray had to play the organ without music and some of those there didn't know the words but it was still fun.

-God Bless---Marge

According to the Morgan museum it was used for many things, like just getting around, until the cars came so then they developed it to do other things. Good articles at that website.

-God Bless---Marge

Daren and all .. go to www.morganhorse.com .. click on FAQ and read about Justin Morgan the man and Justin Morgan the horse ...Alta

There is a woman working at HSBC bank in Massena whom I talked to last summer. Her name I think was Marcia Marsh. I told her we might be related, actually it would be to her husband. I forgot what she said her husband's name was , but then she told me her father'-in-law's name was Morgan Marsh. Can you believe it. When she said Morgan, it made me think that we must be related.
Also, when I lived in my condo, not far from my home in La MIrada there was a family named Morgan at the other end of the same building 6 condos in one building,I think he said he was from PA. Then when I moved to my new home, I rented my condo to a family who had just come to teach at Biola University and their last name was Morgan. He still teaches there and had been a missionary in So. America for about 10 years.
-God Bless---Marge

I think Jack has a link to this on the morgan website, but there are nice articles about the morgan horse at http://www.morganmuseum.org/


-God Bless---Marge

I found something that Lorraine sent me in 2002 so I found it by googling because I thought some of you might enjoy it. This person's website also added music to it. Go to www.dansouza.org/Articles/Theoldbarn.htm


-God Bless---Marge

My understanding is that the Morgan horse was a sort of jack of all trades horse, stocky, lots of endurance.  ‘The Morgan horse was developed as a general purpose horse with an ability to do many tasks well. That versatility continues to stand him in good stead today for those who like a horse that can do a little of everything. “

Daren

ON the subject of Morgan Horses…. When I was teaching 7th grade English at Salmon River CS, the FFA had a field day of sorts.  One of my student’s family breeds Morgan horses and brought a pair to school for the day.  I took each of my classes out to enjoy the day and as I was talking to another teacher, my back was turned to the makeshift stable.  As I stood there the horses put their heads on each of my shoulders.  It was so cool!  Do you think they knew we were related?  LOL

 

Cheryl

 

Perhaps a bunch of us need to plan a day trip to Vermont to visit the National Museum of the Morgan Horse and the Morgan Horse Farm.  Every year the horse farm raffles off a colt.  Tickets are $5.00 with proceeds used to keep the farm going. 

 

Later!

 

 Cheryl

 

Figure…. The first Morgan horse was the fastest and strongest horse in the area.  He was used as both a race horse and a work horse.  The attachment is a pic of Morgan horse from the farm… it’s the mother of the colt they raffled last year.

 

Cheryl


morganhorse

July 12th sounds good, here!  I have talked to my sisters and my nieces and nepher (Alan’s Kids) and they are really looking forward to it! 
Love ya,
Cheryl

How cool!  Did you get a picture?  The day trip sounds like a good follow-up to the reunion!
Carol

Wish I had gotten a picture, but I ran out of space on my digital and couldn’t bear the thought of deleting pictures of my students enjoying the day.

 

It would seem that way, wouldn't it Cheryl?  Too bad there wasn't a picture taken of that!
 
Lorraine

Cheryl ~
    How cool for the horses to put their heads on your shoulders!  Too bad you didn't get a picture of that... it would be priceless, as was the experience.
    I think it would be wonderful to include a trip to the National Museum of the Morgan Horse and the Morgan Horse Farm in my trip East for the reunion.  Count me in!
    Thank you for the picture of the Morgan horse from the farm... what a beauty.
    When I have had to spell my last name for people I have usually told them it is just like the Morgan horse.  I am amazed at how many younger people have no idea what a Morgan horse is.  It wasn't until a few years ago that I discovered that we are related to the originator of the Morgan horse.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Wow, I want to win that colt. There is a nice stable just down the street from us and my girls were brought up riding horses and now their kids all know how to ride. Alta, I love your story about the horse. Looks like the morgan horse is also very loving. I gave the wrong address to get into the weathered barn, just capitalize the word Old and Barn and then you can get in.

-God Bless---Marge

FYI… an interesting fact about the first Morgan horse… not sure if everyone is aware.  Justin Morgan was owed money by a farmer (can’t remember what for… sure it’s in the history someplace.)  The farmer could not pay the debt in cash, but one of Justin’s children fell in love with a colt owned by this farmer.  The colt was given to Justin Morgan to pay off the debt.  That colt, of course, was Figure, the first Morgan Horse.  We Morgan relations are blessed, aren’t we?
Cheryl

Thanks, Pat.  A really compelling scene.  Heard this a.m. that the CO Rockies are in for another low-snow winter.  My son, who is here for a week, is pretty discouraged - he took the oil pan off a new snowmobile last winter due to lack of depth in the snow (in the Glenwood Spgs area), but, of course, that is not the worst of it.  Drought is the worst.  I wonder if you have to worry down in Denver.  I remember that my daughter was planning to visit Denver last year right after Christmas and the airline switched her flight at no cost right up to Grand Junction  in order to avoid the snowed-in Denver area.  Have a safe, snowy winter cousin.  Love, Joan

Alta, remember the night I left Roger's and said "thank you cousins, for all you've done for me."  Actually, your parents did it for all of us - I agree that we have much in common of which we'll probably never even be aware.  Love, Joan

In Rufus's defense, it does sound somewhat like PTSD.  Can anyone tell me what he was like before the Civil War?  Love

Pat, I lived in the Town of Potsdam for all but 24 of my 71 years.  Yes, Kettledam is appropriate, too.  We are much shaped by the glacier that went through here 10,000 years ago.  (Now I've got to look up kettle, I remember what a glacial moraine is - we have many - I'll bet a kettle is the opposite, a kettle shaped indentation.  Help, Daren!)  My son has been here a week and has scarcely seen the sun.  Last time he said he wouldn't even be buried here.  A true Rockie Mt. type, while, when I landed coming back from the beautiful Rockies - i can't take that away from them - I felt like kneeling and kissing the GREEN, GREEN, GREEN!    Love, Joan

Lorraine, I had forgotten that Cheryl died so soon after Helen and Ethel.  It doesn't seem possible it has been so long.  I remember that, while Aunt Ethel was ill, my parents could not go to their kitchen sink without looking over at the Matson place and my mother would say "that girl just cannot die."  I'll tell a little secret now:  my Mom always felt so clumsy and useless beside the Morgan girls - she loved, loved Grandma Alta Morgan and accepted the rest of the family as "family," but she never felt as talented or gifted and was reluctant to move up to the river even (maybe I shouldn't tell this!) because she didn't think she'd be accepted as a good "sister."  WEEEEEELLLLLLL!  Mom came to love Aunt Ethel as well or better than her own sisters.  And I will hear until my dying day, that voice, as she'd come into the hallway up there, "Rena, I just had to show you this . . ."  Always so much enthusiasm and love of life.  That was a special woman.  Love, Joan

Wayne, I looked too.  He's there and, good brother that he is, he even placed a stone there for me (or was he trying to hurry me?).  Now I like the "dust to dust" part - can I just be slipped, without a container, under the rock?  Love, Joan

Shirley, great to get a personal note.  My baby, age 36, finally seems to feel like "one of the family" and is closer all the time to her sisters and brothers.  Have your daughters been able to close the gap?  Love, Joan  (I always wished for a sister and envied my mother and your mother theirs.  It's a special relationship.  I was fortunate always to get sisters-in-laws who acted like family and to whom I felt and still feel close.) Joan

Lorraine - I like that "when you get to be our ages, Cheryl."  When I first moved back to Norwood, I had a hard time remembering that Cheryl was "cousin" and I was not "Aunt Joan."  Cheryl remembers.  Love, Joan

Joan, I'm not sure Brody is going to GET to the teen years.  Was ready to kill him today.  Dug a hole into arm of couch (that I had adready repaired).  Anyway, not necessary to research my Father.  I believe as much research as possible has been done.  If anyone is interested, check the following website:  http://www.breakeycollection.com/   A second cousin on the Breakey side of family has spent years and years researching the family.  Go down to Chapter 7 - Descendants of Isaiah Breakey of Lismagonway.  If you read down far enough, you will find that my Grandfather owned quite a bit of acrage that is now part of Lake Sacandaga.  My Grandfather, as I understand it, was known as a mean old man.  His will left $100. to each of his two sons once his wife also died, and $200. to one nephew, and the farm and acreage to another nephew.  My father and his older brother, Sam, were raised by cousins, I think.  The author and researcher of this collection is My Uncle Sam's Grandaughter.
 
Lorraine

Joan, would any of you northerners be interested in talking to that Marsh at HSBC Bank in Massena to see what can be learned about Rufus?  I think it was Marjorie Pang that mentioned her earlier today.
 
Lorraine

Joan, do you suppose that the reference to Potsdam as Kettledam is merely a comparison of “pots” to “kettles” and has nothing to do with the geological formation by the glaciers? 
Daren

Alta, My Mom HAD a much loved copy, too, and it has disappeared.  She really did love it.  I hadn't taken it yet to listen to, but we'll replace it won't we, Jack?  NOTHING gives me the thrill in life that singing with the cousins does.  Loved hymns was why we had the keyboard there - Etta Rae was to have played them for us, but I'm not sure that the keyboard had enough volumn anyway.  IT IS A MUST FOR THE NEXT ONE.  Love, Joan

Daren, I expect she is dead now.  I wish I had counted her fingers and toes.  Aside from eccentric, I did not notice anything else wrong with her.  Love, Joan

I imagine it is quite possible that Peggy and Maude were Morgan horses.

The first Morgan was definitely a WORK horse.  Justin loaned him out for logging, etc., but he also raced and beat everything in sight.  Actually, he was admired, but no one knew that he could pass those traits to his offspring which is his biggest accomplishment - he began a new breed.  Joan

Marge, you won't believe this, but I followed the name "Morgan Marsh" for quite some time after I moved back here and he was not related!  I read his obit and he was born in Ireland, i think.  Can you verify that, Chuck?  I could find it pretty easily at Mas. Lib., but don't plan to go soon.
 
Even stranger, is (or was - I'm not sure he is still living) FORREST MORGAN in Saranac Lake.  I discovered an article written in the 70s about his athletic self and children (bobsledding and luge) and wrote him saying "you must be one of us."  He visited me at the lib., and believe it or not, he, too was from Ireland and his mother had named him "Forrest" after a Civil War general. Oh, well, as Jimmy Breslin said . . . we can't all be incestuous.  Love, Joan

Maybe we should set aside a week for this reunion, i.e., cemetery repairs, visits to Vt., hymn sings, WC auditions, etc.  Joan

Marge, that colt does not have my permission to go to CA.  He has to stay where the climate is kinder.  Love, Joan (and there are few earth quakes)

Joan, Yes my girls are extremely close.  They will travel miles and hours to honor one another for a birthday, etc. I live in VA and I can remember when Kristy (the youngest) turned 16, Kelly (the oldest of the girls) drove all the way down from NY to help celebrate that magical 16th birthday.  They have all been present at each other's childrens births and they all still get together and spend Christmas morning around the same Christmas tree in someone's house. I guess you could say they have a strong bond in spite of the age differences.

Shirley 

That is a problem. We are all waiting for the big one, which I believe will be planned. There are Morgan horses here because I saw one at the Promona Fairgrounds where they hold the LA Fair.

-God Bless---Marge

Joan, I have a spanish rice recipe that I started out using - Virginia Johnson's recipe in the WSCS cookbook.  But, actually have made a few changes so that now I call it my own.  I added olive's also, after having it that way at Cheryl's once.  Then, I thought cut up chunks of cheddar cheese in it would be good also.  Then, instead of using tomato paste, I used a 15 1/2 oz. can tomato sauce instead, but still finished it off with bacon on top before baking, which gives it a nice flavor.
Lorraine

Joan,  I don,t think the DEC would approve of your ashes being placed under the rock.   Wayne

All of these ideas sound great to me - a day in Vermont(how far is it, Cheryl?), a day at the cemetery repairing and beautifying, a day at Lake Azonia, and a day at the farm.  Whew!  Getting tired already.  Lois

Hi All,
    We still have not set a firm date and place for the next reunion and some folks (those poor suckers that still are working) need to know to plan ahead.
    I propose we make a firm commitment so Alta and others can start planning.
    How about:
    Sat and Sun July 12 & 13th 2008
          at the Haggett Farm with "clean up" at
           Roger's place on Sunday if he is willing.
   
    Get your vote in  by December 10th and let's go from there.  
    Plan your visit to include all the other side trips which, when we have a firm date for the reunion can be planned by those who wish to make the "extras".
    If all this sounds too bossy; sorry but my 22 year Navy "organization" habits are sneaking out on me.  After we set the date, I will keep my military nose out of it. (Promises??)
Love to all,
Tom

Joan, Dick and I have prepaid our funeral expenses.  I had told the man we talked to that I had always said I was going to bury Dick in the backyard with the dogs.  The man said that with cremation, actually you could do anything you want with the ashes (probably he should have added "just as long as you don't get caught".  He said that even if you have a cemetary plot, you could sprinkle the ashes on top of grave and just kind of rake into the ground, and then you don't have the expense of opening a grave.  I'm sure the man was just making sure we were going to buy the policy!
 
Lorraine

Sounds great to me, too, Lois!  Thanks for the invit. Marge.  I'm not even sure I could find my way to Lake Azonia anymore.
 
Lorraine

Sorry all, I thought the date was set and have marked the calendar!  Alta?  July 12 & 13 ok?
 
Lorraine

12 & 13th works for me, just wont be able to fish those two days..well..let me qualify that..there is a rive at the farm isn’t there  J

 

Daren L. Morgan

Hi Daren, yes there's a river on the farm, but don't forget it's probably going to be set on fire by the retired Navy!
 
Lorraine

Just to add my 2 cents for what it's worth.  I think July 12, 13 is fine and we (hubby and I) will definitely try to make it. Haven't been to Norwood in about 55 years.  I'm anxious to meet all of you.  I already feel like I know you're personality just through your chit-chats.


Cousin Shirley  (Orr) Etheridge, daughter of Walter & Mildred 

Actually, I think my Mom was just trying to be silly and not say "dam" so she would call it KettleDARN.  I didn't know this would start a philosophical discussion, just thought it was good for a laugh.  I under-estimate my cousins.  LOL
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Lol..I missed that part Pat…got the kettle and pots…I think Cousin Joan carried it one step further.  We can never seem to take things at face value..lol..always have to dig a little deeper.

 

Daren L. Morgan

Joan and Lorraine,
    How did we ever get back onto this subject Joan?  But as long as we are here...Lorraine, we too have prepaid our cremation expenses (no funeral director or high costs..$695 prepaid).  State laws may very, but in Minnesota you can do what you please with the ashes..spread them, set them on the mantle, bury them or feed them to the dog.  Only restriction is you can't spread them in the face of a Minnesota die hard fisherman when he has a walleye on his line.
    Joan, I think you should spread them on Chucks site.
Tom

Shirley,
    55 years?   I didn't know we were that old already.  Aren't we still in our 40's?  Some of us sure act it...no comments Chuck or Lorraine.
Love you Sis,
Tom

Tom ~
    Some aren't even acting like they are in their 40's... more like their teens, or younger!  (Sorry, you didn't say I couldn't make a comment... you didn't cover all the bases!)

LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Tom, I do feel like it 'sometimes'.  Working around all these kids daily, I haven't learned how to act my age yet.

mom ; Shirley ; Grandma 

Tom and all ~
    In California we had to sign a paper stating what we were going to do with my mother's ashes.  Of course, there was no way they could check on us and see if we did what we said we would.  (Just for the record, we did.)  I think Lorraine hit the nail on the head when she said, "If you don't get caught."  Also, I think you are right, Tom... the law is different in each state.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Joan ~
    I have lost track... all I know is that the children of Edson are my first cousins, grandchildren of Edson are my first cousins once removed, and great-grandchildren of Edson are my first cousins twice removed.  Whew! 
    I guess I am the odd man out... but it doesn't matter because I know that all of you love me and I don't feel left out in any way.
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Hey, Shirley ~
    That's what keeps me young.  Plus, it is a good excuse to play with kids' toys and act silly.  Tom, you don't need an excuse.  LOL
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Daren ~
    It's probably a good thing we don't just take things at face value... all of these wonderful emails would have stopped long ago.  I am so enjoying them.  Thanks, Tom, for getting me in the loop!
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Shirley, where about in Va. do you live?  I thought you were still around Rochester somewhere. 
 
Lorraine

Pat, as far as I'm concerned - forget all the first, seconds etc.  You can be our Honorary First Cousin!
 
Lorraine

Thank you!
 
LOVE AND HUGS,
HAPPY HEART: PAT

Not that it really matters..but to add to the confusion, have fun trying to sort this out  J

 

If one person's →

Grandparent

Great grandparent

Great great grandparent

Great great great grandparent

Great great great great grandparent

Great great great great great grandparent

is the other person's

then they're ↘

Grandparent

First cousins

First cousins once removed

First cousins twice removed

First cousins thrice removed

First cousins four times removed

First cousins five times removed

Great grandparent

First cousins once removed

Second cousins

Second cousins once removed

Second cousins twice removed

Second cousins thrice removed

Second cousins four times removed

Great great grandparent

First cousins twice removed

Second cousins once removed

Third cousins

Third cousins once removed

Third cousins twice removed

Third cousins thrice removed